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Film as Art

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Rick-Founder JM CM BOOK CLUB  | 57 comments I feel there are some movies so beautifully made that they can be classified as works of art- I specifically refer to A RIVER RUNS THROUGH IT


message 2: by Xime (new)

Xime Hr (ximehr) | 3 comments I totally agree with you, Rick! Have you seen The Girl with the Pearl Earring? It's so interesting that besides being a story about Vermeer almost every frame of the film could be a painting by him. The color, the composition... I just love it


message 3: by Heather (new)

Heather I haven't seen either of those films, Rick and Ximena. But I am looking forward to checking them out due to your positive reviews. That is really neat how you feel that the film The Girl with the Pearl Earring is so much like artwork itself. I am really interested in that! Rick,I'm don't know much about A River Runs Through It. What is it about?


message 4: by Carol (new)

Carol (goodreadscomcarolann) | 1140 comments I liked the set design and costumes in The Girl with the Pearl Earring. I thought that Johansson and Firth were fine but the script wasn't fantastic.
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Making paint --
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message 5: by Rick-Founder JM CM BOOK CLUB (last edited Feb 11, 2011 04:46PM) (new)

Rick-Founder JM CM BOOK CLUB  | 57 comments Heather wrote: "I haven't seen either of those films, Rick and Ximena. But I am looking forward to checking them out due to your positive reviews. That is really neat how you feel that the film The Girl with the ..."

A River Runs Through it is a novella by the late Norman MacLean- very much a memoir as much of it is fact- concerning his search for meaning..some 50 years later about the truth concerning his family and expecially his brother Paul, who was murdered in his early 20's. The Montana locations are amazing and the acting and symbolism are spot on. Originally meant as a story about fly-fishing and religion,,it became a classic- and Robert Redford was finally able to convince MacLean to allow the book to be filmed (Many others had tried and failed).


Rick-Founder JM CM BOOK CLUB  | 57 comments Carol wrote: "I liked the set design and costumes in The Girl with the Pearl Earring. I thought that Johansson and Firth were fine but the script wasn't fantastic.



Making paint --

have not seen it- but the screen shots are breath-taking!!

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Rick-Founder JM CM BOOK CLUB  | 57 comments Hitchcock's STRANGERS ON A TRAIN, is also- in my opinion..a work of art- the camera angles, use of shadows and the musical score- combine with Robert Walker's stunning performance to produce an orignal work worthy of the term ART


message 8: by Haaze (new)

Haaze | 131 comments Time to reawaken this wonderful thread about film!!!! It is such a great art form after all (well, it can be)!

This morning I read an article in NYT about a new streaming service. Half an hour later I'm signed up for a free trial watching Criterion movies. I think I'm in trouble, but I love film!!!!! (and books...and music...and art...hehehe). Am I perhaps a bit impulsive?

Anyways, you can check it out at:
www.filmstruck.com/

It seems very enticing. I suspect that some of you love these types of movies as well.


message 9: by Helene (new)

Helene (heleneh1) | 2 comments Haha, I don't think your impulsive at all. That Film struck service looks amazing - pity it's only available in the US.
Personally, I enjoy classic film noir movies. I'm not too certain they classify as 'art' though.

When thinking about film as art, something like Coriolanus (Ralph Fiennes' directorial debut) springs to my mind. He set Coriolanus in the former Yugoslav territory to give it a more 'current' feel. The attention to the text of Shakespeare, its interpretation by the director, the costumes, the setting, etc. make it very 'artful'.


message 10: by Galicius (new)

Galicius One of my literature professors considered Ingmar Bergman, his films from the fifties and sixties, on parallel with great literature. We discussed “Wild Strawberries”, “The Seventh Seal” along with T. S. Eliot, Thomas Mann, and others. I quoted from Bergman film scripts in my term papers.


message 11: by Haaze (last edited Nov 16, 2016 08:30AM) (new)

Haaze | 131 comments Galicius wrote: "One of my literature professors considered Ingmar Bergman, his films from the fifties and sixties, on parallel with great literature. We discussed “Wild Strawberries”, “The Seventh Seal” along with..."

Definitely! I'm a Bergman fan myself and find his films astounding as one can watch them over and over finding new aspects each time. I generally find a lot of "artsy" films to be European in origin. They are often about real life situations that have impact on me as a person. I keep thinking about them for days, months, years after watching the films. In contrast, lots of the Hollywood fare is in the shiny entertainment realm with plenty of CGI and action. Often fun to watch but emotionally and culturally empty. Film of the "artsy" kind is definitely made in the US but has a hard time to reach mainstream media. Anyways, I do love film. Thanks for bringing up the shining light of Bergman in the thread! :)




message 12: by Haaze (last edited Nov 16, 2016 08:43AM) (new)

Haaze | 131 comments NH wrote: "Haha, I don't think your impulsive at all. That Film struck service looks amazing - pity it's only available in the US.
Personally, I enjoy classic film noir movies. I'm not too certain they class..."


Perhaps Filmstruck will reach out to other nations. I would think that Europe could be a strong niche for the company. However, much depends on the success of the venture here in the US, I really hope that they do well over the next 12 months and onwards. Thanks for bringing up Fienne's debut. I was not aware of 'Coriolanus' even though it was released in 2011. I think I have come across it but didn't react to it at the time. I'm one of those people that have a hard time with directors altering the settings/staging of the plays. E.g. I do like Hamlet in the castle in Denmark rather than , let's say a bunch of Hells Angels on motor bikes dressed in leather jackets (yes, that was one version of Hamlet years ago here in Santa Cruz). So - you would recommend this enactment of 'Coriolanus'? At first look it seems quite violent in its approach. I will try to watch it over the next few days...




message 13: by Heather (new)

Heather What about musicals? Because we esteem a lot of music as art... I absolutely love the movies and especially plays of Phantom of the Opera, Les Miserables, and The Scarlett Pimpernel.








message 14: by A (new)

A | 270 comments Film is undoubtedly art, but certain films standout as visually artistic in presentation. There are many, but what came to the top of my head is 'Hero' (2002).


message 15: by Leo (new)

Leo Borgelin | 5 comments Rick wrote: "I feel there are some movies so beautifully made that they can be classified as works of art- I specifically refer to A RIVER RUNS THROUGH IT"
This is what I feel about Christopher Nolan. It was him who gave me a passion for film


message 16: by Aloha (last edited Jun 20, 2017 07:53PM) (new)

Aloha | 163 comments Mirrormask (2005), directot Dave McKean, is the epitome of art as film.

https://goo.gl/images/HFuMBW


message 17: by Aloha (new)

Aloha | 163 comments Tim Burton's movies are beautifully crafted art pieces.


message 18: by Leo (new)

Leo Borgelin | 5 comments Christopher Nolan bridges the gap between fantasy and realism. What makes Tim Burton or Dave Mckean so special?


message 19: by Aloha (new)

Aloha | 163 comments I was blown away by Mirrormask's moving Klee-like, surrealistic imagery. The movie was a collaboration with Neil Gaiman, whose fantasy novels I enjoyed. It has a YA theme of a rebellion, growing up and self-realization but in that special unique surrealistic artful way. Feast for the eyes!

If you ever saw the behind the scenes of Tim Burton's preparation for a movie, you'll be amazed at the thought and artistic integration that goes into his movies.


message 20: by Geoffrey (new)

Geoffrey Aronson (geaaronson) | 930 comments DAYS OF HEAVEN, the first scene of MISSION, first 15 minutes of THE MAN WHO FELL TO EARTH the scenery in the LORD OF THE RINGS and the HOBBIT, the music groups practice performance in LISBOA by Werzog


message 21: by Heather (new)

Heather Aloha wrote: "Mirrormask (2005), directot Dave McKean, is the epitome of art as film.

https://goo.gl/images/HFuMBW"


I'm not familiar with Dave McKean but I checked out the link you posted and I have to agree with you, Aloha. It really does seem like a painting on pause.

And I think Tim Burton is fantastic! I can't even imagine how much work would have to be put into making his movies!


message 22: by Aloha (new)

Aloha | 163 comments Heather, I saw Mirrormask again and the imageries are still fascinating.


message 23: by Heather (new)

Heather Aloha wrote: "Heather, I saw Mirrormask again and the imageries are still fascinating."

I'll have to check it out!


message 24: by Dirk, Moderator (new)

Dirk Van | 3047 comments Still browsing 8 years of threads and posts ;-) Today I found this thread. Let’s bring it back to live!
Anyone ever heard of Miyazaki and Studio Ghibli?
In Japan he is more famous than Disney and his movies are fantastic.
Here are some pics and a link for a webpage, where someone took the time to collect all the lovely backgrounds of the movies: 61 pics! Certainly worth your time!

https://randomwallpapersandpics.wordp...

The pictures are from Kiki's Delivery Service (1989)


https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0097814/





And my favorite:

My Neighbor Totoro (1988)
https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0096283/...




message 25: by Dirk, Moderator (new)


message 26: by Heather (new)

Heather This is interesting stuff you bring to this thread, Dirk! I like going through it, this is all new to me.

BTW, is your primary language English? Even your grammar is good!

One thing that impresses me about this group is how we all speak a bit of English whether it’s our native tongue or not. And those of us whose native language is English, have good grammar. (Yes, I’m a bit of a grammar Nazi but I concede spelling is a bit more difficult for me).


message 27: by Dirk, Moderator (new)

Dirk Van | 3047 comments No English is my second language, I was born and raised in a little village in a part of Flanders what we call "de Kempen" But I have been living now for 40 years in Antwerp. When starting high school I was one of the first with a choice between French and English as second language. For some reason I don't remember I chose English.
And I have been reading English ever since.
And for the last 15 years or so I have English colleagues at work so I practice speaking and writing (mails) a lot.
Curious: was there something particular about my grammar that struck you?


message 28: by Heather (new)

Heather Dirk wrote: "Curious: was there something particular about my grammar that struck you? "

These are simple grammar, but ones that some people get wrong in every day speech and it drives me nuts! So far, I have never heard anyone in the group say any of this incorrectly. You included.

PictureS ARE
Another director IS

Some people with whom I associate at work and other places tend to say the plural 'pictures' (for example) IS, instead of ARE. As for the singular 'director', most people do get that correct. But they seem to say 'IS' after every noun whether singular or plural.

Another thing that drives me crazy is for example, if I were to say "this group is doing so GOOD". Instead of "this group is doing so WELL". I'm not actually sure if that is a grammatical error or just more proper English. But when someone asks how I am, I always say "I'm doing well" instead of "I'm good". It just irks me a bit. Anyone else?


message 29: by Heather (new)

Heather Oh, another one. Putting 'a' instead of 'an' in front of a word beginning with a vowel. "An ostrich" is correct, some people say "a ostrich" which sounds choppy and is just wrong! I'm a nerd!


message 30: by Dirk, Moderator (new)

Dirk Van | 3047 comments Ah, "are" and "is" feel natural for me, comes without effort ;-)

But I must say that I don't "feel" the difference between "good" and "well".
I know my English colleagues say: "I'm good" when I ask: "Do you want some more coffee?"
But that one says "Cheers" in stead of "Thank you" So I think it's a sort of dialect?
In Flemish we speak mostly very differently from writing. More than 60 years ago the Dutch and Flemish language came together in a combination called ABN, later shortened to AN (because the B referred to "beschaafd" which translates to "civilized").
AN is very different from the dialect everyone is still speaking (even on television)
But how do you feel about the differences between written English and American? What do you think if I write "colour" in stead of "Color"? Or "Civilesed" in stead "civilized"?


message 31: by Heather (new)

Heather That doesn't bother me. I realize that the original English is a bit different than American. I think American English is sloppy in a way, but it's how I was raised so I don't know any differently.

(that's another one! 'ly' on the end of words). We don't say "I don't know different", we don't say "I said that correct", we say "I said that correctLY". lol I could go on and on but don't think of things until I hear or read them. And in a way, the more I go on, the more I start second guessing my own grammar! I know I say things wrong and correct myself, literally out loud. Sometimes I frustrate myself!


message 32: by Stuart (last edited Nov 16, 2018 05:28PM) (new)

Stuart | 31 comments I am currently reading P. Adams Sitney's "Visionary Film". Is anyone else in this group interested in art films, such as those described in his book? His First chapter begins with a comparison of Bunuel/Dali's "La Chien Andalou" (1929) and Maya Deren's "Meshes of the Afternoon" (1943).


message 33: by Dirk, Moderator (new)

Dirk Van | 3047 comments Hi Stuart,
Are you new? Welcome to the group!

I know both movies, but they are not my favorites...
Both are short and surrealistic.
I can appreciate surrealism in paintings, not so much in movies.
Did you watch them?


message 34: by Heather (new)

Heather Hey Stuart! Welcome to the group, or if you’re not new, we welcome your post!

Personally, I am not familiar with much film or many movies. I’m glad this thread has some activity!

Thank you for your comment!


message 35: by Stuart (last edited Nov 16, 2018 09:34PM) (new)

Stuart | 31 comments Dirk wrote: "I know both movies,....
Did you watch them?."


I did. I had seen them both before. But I rewatched them fresh to keep in mind what he said about them in the book.

From what I can tell at least the early chapters seem to consist of comparing the films of the 40s/50s era with a classic surrealist film of the 20s.... "Meshes of the Afternoon" with "La Chien Andalou", Deren's other films with Cocteau's "Sang d'un poete" Sidney Peterson's "Potted Psalm" with Entr'acte... and so on...

I like "Meshes of the Afternoon". When I was in school my art history teacher showed us a section of "The Divine Horsemen" but I think "Meshes of the afternoon" is a better choice and is among Deren's best work. Sitney argues that after Deren went to Haiti her films became much more philosophical (and intellectually mature perhaps) but unable to deliver on the ideas she attempted to convey. I am inclined to agree I guess. Though even her later films have interesting moments but he is right that the style and approach changed.

I have been on Goodreads for some years but I just joined this group in hopes that others would be interested in talking about this book. Thank for the response!


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