The Mystery, Crime, and Thriller Group discussion

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Book Hunting / Recommendations > Mystery / Thriller

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message 1: by Dalene (new)

Dalene  | 37 comments Looking for recommendations of books or authors for 13 year old girl wanting to read mysteries similar to the CSI shows. She enjoys the intrigue presented in the shows and is wanting that in the books. However, still trying to keep in mind her age and obviously not wanting something too crude. What mystery books or authors got you hooked to the genre as a young reader?


message 2: by Paul (new)

Paul  Perry (pezski) | 233 comments This might sound and odd suggestion, but you can't go far wrong going back to the source. Arthur Conan Doyle's Sherlock Holmes stories are incredible readable, far more so than many other authors of a similar period. They show the genesis of forensic thought and investigation, and are superbly told. I first read them in my mid teens.

Also, it's amazing how many references there are to them in CSI and other shows. i believe Gil Grissom was something of a fan.


message 3: by Merrill (new)

Merrill Heath | 61 comments You can't go wrong with Sherlock Holmes. I devoured the stories when I was that age. They don't have the technical forensics stuff, but they are very entertaining mysteries and Holmes' logical methods and intellectual acuity are fun.

Merrill Heath
Bearing False Witness


message 4: by Tracy (new)

Tracy | 32 comments Anything written by Tess Gerritsen is great. She is a doctor in real life and one of her main characters is a medical examiner.
Her writing is fast but full of interesting medical evidences. She writes stand alone novels and an ongoing series that starts with "The Surgeon.
Check out these stand alone novels to see what you think.
"The Bone Garden" and "Gravity"


message 5: by Jan C (new)

Jan C (woeisme) | 35534 comments Sherlock Holmes is good.

I started reading mysteries with Nancy Drew.

Max Allan Collins has written a couple of CSI books, also one on Bones. He also has a number of books using historical people in mysteries - there was on Orson Welles' radio show The War of the Worlds, Agatha Christie was used, one took place aboard the Lusitania, I think there was one on the Titanic.

Don't know if any of these ideas help.


message 6: by Karendenice (new)

Karendenice I know these aren't the type of books you all are talking about. But I thought I would throw them out just in case. A friend's daughter loves them and has convinced me to read them, which I haven't done yet. She is 14 and loves mysteries. One is historicl fiction and the other is a ghost story. Just another option.

Promises to the Dead by Mary Downing Hahn and Deep and Dark and Dangerous: A Ghost Story by the same author.


message 7: by Kate (new)

Kate | 2 comments I live two minutes walk from where Sir Arthur Conan Doyle grew up. Edinburgh is such a mixture of fairytale and darkness. It was then and it still is now. He had a fine mind and a good imagination nurtured in this fascinating city.


message 8: by кєяo (new)

кєяo (echoinggreen) | 58 comments Paul 'Pezter' wrote: "This might sound and odd suggestion, but you can't go far wrong going back to the source. Arthur Conan Doyle's Sherlock Holmes stories are incredible readable, far more so than many o..."

CSI is available in books too. I managed to get hold of one, CSI: Sin City and loved it. A few are lying in my wishlist.


message 9: by кєяo (last edited Oct 15, 2011 03:57PM) (new)

кєяo (echoinggreen) | 58 comments Jan C wrote: "Sherlock Holmes is good.

I started reading mysteries with Nancy Drew.

Max Allan Collins has written a couple of CSI books, also one on Bones. He also has a number of books using historical pe..."


I have read CSI: Sin City by Max Allan Collins. It was fabulous. I don't remember if I posted my review on Goodreads but it is there on my blog.


message 10: by The Pirate Ghost (new)

The Pirate Ghost (Formerly known as the Curmudgeon) (pirateghost) Lets not forget the Hardy Boys and Nancy Drew? (maybe a bit safe for 13 year olds these days, but in my day they were pretty fun. ... a distant day.


message 11: by кєяo (last edited Oct 15, 2011 11:10PM) (new)

кєяo (echoinggreen) | 58 comments Hugh (A.K.A. Hermit the Curmudgeon) wrote: "Lets not forget the Hardy Boys and Nancy Drew? (maybe a bit safe for 13 year olds these days, but in my day they were pretty fun. ... a distant day."

Lol! I read Nancy Drew and the Hardy's till I got 18;)


message 12: by The Pirate Ghost (new)

The Pirate Ghost (Formerly known as the Curmudgeon) (pirateghost) I might still read one if it fell into my hands. Hardy Boys were my first book born fiction role models.


message 13: by The Pirate Ghost (new)

The Pirate Ghost (Formerly known as the Curmudgeon) (pirateghost) I'd also ad, no sex, and limited carefully measured violence in mild easy to tame scenes (very few of them) and lots of mysteries with the brave brothers.

The Tower Treasureby Franklin W. Dixon


message 14: by Creature (new)

Creature | 93 comments Hello:
I read the Hardy Boys as a kid also. I just read one I haven't read about three months ago. It was good.
Have a Great Day!!!
The "Ceature"


message 15: by кєяo (new)

кєяo (echoinggreen) | 58 comments Hugh (A.K.A. Hermit the Curmudgeon) wrote: "I'd also ad, no sex, and limited carefully measured violence in mild easy to tame scenes (very few of them) and lots of mysteries with the brave brothers.

The Tower Treasureby [autho..."


I read that one, but pretty late.


message 16: by Georgia (new)

Georgia | 536 comments Jan wrote that she is reading Nancy Drew. OMG I read those stories when I was a teenager. What do you think of them now Jan. I assume that you are older than a teenager.


message 17: by кєяo (last edited Oct 17, 2011 02:13PM) (new)

кєяo (echoinggreen) | 58 comments Has anyone read the Nancy Drew and Hardy boys super mystery? I read Dangerous Games (A Nancy Drew and Hardy Boys Super Mystery, #4)last year. It was fabulous.


message 18: by Jan C (new)

Jan C (woeisme) | 35534 comments If I'm the Jan in question, I haven't read Nancy Drew since the '60s.

I have, however, read Not A Girl Detective: A Cece Caruso Mystery by Susan Kandel where Cece and friends fall in with a Nancy Drew convention in Palm Springs. It was entertaining.


message 19: by Hayes, Co-Moderator (new)

Hayes (hayes13) | 2060 comments Mod
Hugh (A.K.A. Hermit the Curmudgeon) wrote: "I'd also ad, no sex, and limited carefully measured violence in mild easy to tame scenes (very few of them) and lots of mysteries with the brave brothers.

The Tower Treasureby [autho..."


I confess that I have never read one... have they "modernized" them like Nancy Drew? They brought her to the modern age and I think she lost all her charm.


message 20: by Rachel (new)

Rachel Cotterill (rachelcotterill) I started (around that age or younger) with Agatha Christie, then Cadfael and Morse. But if she likes CSI, I think Thorndyke (by R. Austin Freeman) would be great, too. There's a good short story collection free from Project Gutenberg so it wouldn't cost anything to find out if she likes them :)


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