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message 1: by [deleted user] (last edited Feb 08, 2011 03:03AM) (new)

Early Thoughts

Style - this seems to be a little difficult to get used to. In the prologue I kept asking myself, whose point of view is this being told from? Who precisely is the narrator, and do we really need to know? Is it the sergeant's? Is this dialogue being written in an unconventional format? Are there also a character's thoughts being conveyed? Couldn't this narrative have been better told in a more usual form?

The sections with Aquilino and Fushia I find myself having to read twice, and even then I'm not sure whether I've grasped it. It seems to involve timeshift into Fushia's past? It'll be interesting to see what others think.


message 2: by Carrie (new)

Carrie Ridgeway | 13 comments David (Dafydd) wrote: "Early Thoughts

Style - this seems to be a little difficult to get used to. In the prologue I kept asking myself, whose point of view is this being told from? Who precisely is the narrator, and..."


I also found the prologue to be difficult to follow. It almost seemed to written in a way to make the reader feel the nervousness and tension that seemed to going on at the time.


message 3: by [deleted user] (last edited Feb 09, 2011 11:43PM) (new)

Carrie wrote: "David (Dafydd) wrote: "Early Thoughts

Style - this seems to be a little difficult to get used to. In the prologue I kept asking myself, whose point of view is this being told from? Who precisely..."


It is reassuring to know that I'm not the only one who finds the narrative difficult to follow, and I begin to wonder if there are some cultural norms which make it so? Is there something about the way stories are told in South America which make them difficult when translated into English. I'm a great admirer of writer such as Isabel Allende and Jorge Amado and, while they can be difficult in places, I'm eventually able to resolve their narrative.


message 4: by [deleted user] (new)

Right I think I've got it, the conversations between Aquilino and Fushia are a device for telling the back story and the kidnapping at Chicais is not the real beginning but is also part of the back story. Not at all sure about the characters of Don Fabio and Don Reategui other than they seem to form part of a corrupt elite in this remoter part of Peru. If I am way off in these assumptions, please let me know.


message 5: by [deleted user] (new)

* Spoiler Alert*
One of the relationships that fascinates me is that between Bonifacia and the nuns, Sister Angelica and the Mother Superior. I'm getting the impression that the nuns are in the business of supplying domestic help to local families and that Bonifacia realises that this is wrong and by aiding and abetting in the children's escape is seeking to undermine a well-established but corrupt system.

I remain puzzled by the characters of Lituma, Monk, Jose and Josefino, and the Leons. Are they simply frequenters of the Green House or do they have a more crucial role in the story?


message 6: by Carrie (new)

Carrie Ridgeway | 13 comments Finally finished part 1. (I've been sidetracked by our local library's book club read for March, which, I've now finished.) Wikipedia has a very nice summary and character list for this book that has helped me immensely. It's been a challenge to keep up with who's who, and how the characters are all connected to one another.


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