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Polls > April/May 2011 poll

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message 1: by Gina (new)

Gina | 319 comments Mod
The April/May poll is ready! You'll find it on our group homepage, and it closes at midnight on Thursday.
Here's a summary of the books, from the Persephone website:
The Runaway by Elizabeth Anna Hart
This 1872 novel by a mid-Victorian poet and novelist is about a girl named Clarice, living with her widowed father and her governess 'in a charming home at a convenient (railway) distance from the city.' One day she finds a girl of her own age hiding in the shrubbery. She is Olga and 'there is no question that she is the liveliest child character in English fiction' said the Observer in 1936.

Julian Grenfell by Nicholas Mosley
This biography of the First World War poet Julian Grenfell, first published in 1976, is, we believe, one of the best biographies of recent times - partly because so much of it is about his mother, the fascinating but maddening Ettie Desborough. It is quite short compared with many modern biographies, and very readably written:Nicholas Mosley's career has been as a much-acclaimed novelist, yet for this work of non-fiction he was also able to draw on extremely interesting and previously unused family papers.
The subtitle is 'His life and the times of his death' and by that, as Mosley explains in a new Preface, he 'meant to convey the idea that Julian Grenfell's short life was circumscribed by the time into which he was born; that to a young man from Julian's background who grew up in the years leading to the First World War, the style and attitudes of the society around him were such that the chance of death was something almost to be welcomed as a way of dealing with the predicaments that confronted him.'
Julian and his generation seemed to want to die in battle: to help the reader towards an understanding of this is the main theme of the book. It also brings Edwardian society to life, as well as describing in detail his relationship with his mother: this is the strongest element in Julian Grenfell, stronger even than the theme of the welcoming of war.

Family Roundabout by Richmal Crompton
Richmal Crompton created William, the pugnacious anti-hero of thirty books selling over 8 million copies in her lifetime; but their author once hinted that a 'Frankenstein monster' had ambushed her forty novels for adults.
We publish a 1948 novel about the life of two families during the inter-war years. Instead of seeing William at odds with adults, we are shown the matriarchs around whom their families spin; but whether they direct their children gently or forcefully, in the end they have to accept them as they are.
We see that families can both entrap and sustain; that parents and children must respect each other; and that happiness necessitates jumping or being pushed off the family roundabout.

They Knew Mr Knight by Dorothy Whipple
A Book Society Choice, shortlisted for the Femina-Vie Heureuse Prize, the second Dorothy Whipple novel we publish is also wonderfully well-written in a clear and straightforward style; yet 'this real treat' (Sunday Telegraph) is far more subtle than it at first appears.
The Blakes are an ordinary family: Celia looks after the house and Thomas works at the family engineering business in Leicester. The book begins when he meets Mr Knight, a financier as crooked as any on the front pages of our newspapers nowadays; and tracks his and his family's swift climb and fall.
Part of the cause of the ensuing tragedy is Celia's innocence - blinkered by domesticity, she and her children are the 'victim of the turbulence of the outside world' (Postscript); but finally, through 'quiet tenacity and the refusal to let go of certain precious things, goodness does win out' (Afterword). And the TLS wrote: 'The portraits in the book are fired by Mrs Whipple's article of faith - the supreme importance of people.'


message 2: by Gina (new)

Gina | 319 comments Mod
Just a reminder--the poll closes at midnight on Thurs morning...get your votes in! :)


message 3: by Gina (new)

Gina | 319 comments Mod
Sorry for the delay!
We'll be reading They Knew Mr. Knight in April,
Family Roundabout in May, and The Runaway in June (since it was only one vote behind the other two). I believe these 3 books are available on Persephone's website (they're not reprinting right now).


message 4: by Carol (new)

Carol Eshaghy | 16 comments Whet do I find the discussions on the books chosen? Carol


message 5: by Gina (new)

Gina | 319 comments Mod
Carol wrote: "Whet do I find the discussions on the books chosen? Carol"
Hi Carol! Sorry for the delayed response. Whenever anyone wants to start a thread, just go to the Persephone group page, and click on “discussions” (we haven’t started any discussions yet on Farewell Leicester Square). Then you’ll click on “new topic” near the top middle of the page, and you’ll be able to start a new thread. The easiest way to keep things organized is to select the book’s name for the “folder” drop-down (I always add the books as folder titles once they’re selected). Let me know if you have any other questions!


message 6: by Carol (new)

Carol Eshaghy | 16 comments Thanks so much. I am new at this and not that computer savvy either. I will try to figure it out. Thanks so much for all you do. Are you on the regular Goodreads too? Love to be your friend.


message 7: by Laura (new)

Laura (digifish_books) | 41 comments Gina wrote: "Sorry for the delay!
We'll be reading They Knew Mr. Knight in April,
Family Roundabout in May, and The Runaway in June (since it was only one vote behind the other two). I believe these 3 books ar..."


I'm looking forward to getting stuck into 'They Knew Mr Knight' in April. I am definitely ready for more Whipple!


message 8: by Karen (new)

Karen (karenlibrarian13) | 26 comments I'm also excited about more Whipple. And Persephone is reprinting another of her books, Greenbanks, this fall; next year they're reprinting Because of the Lockwoods. She is so good.


message 9: by Laura (new)

Laura (digifish_books) | 41 comments Karen wrote: "I'm also excited about more Whipple. And Persephone is reprinting another of her books, Greenbanks, this fall; next year they're reprinting Because of the Lockwoods. She is so good."

Oh, that is wonderful news!


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