A Thousand Splendid Suns A Thousand Splendid Suns discussion


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BJ review

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message 1: by bjneary (last edited Aug 25, 2016 12:40PM) (new) - rated it 5 stars

bjneary I just finished A Thousand Splendid Suns and I found it achingly poignant, just as riveting as Kite Runner and I was so drawn to Mariam and Laila's lives in Afghanistan. This novel speaks volumes about the travesty of revolution in this country, the never ending travails of its people and they are still so resilient. I highly recommend this novel because of its cultural significance, the horrors that young girls must endure marrying when they 13 or 14 and strict adherence to ideas that place educated women as subservient and having no voice in society


message 2: by Natalie (last edited Aug 25, 2016 12:57PM) (new) - rated it 5 stars

Natalie BJ's review says it all. I read this book in a day. Even with two small children needing my attention, I found that I could not pull myself away from the lives of Mariam and Laila. It's the kind of book that when you do put down, you feel like you're missing a TV show or movie. Magnificant!


message 3: by Jamie (last edited Aug 25, 2016 12:58PM) (new) - rated it 5 stars

Jamie As I read this book I couldn't believe these horrors and brutalities against women were allowed to happen in the late 20th century. It read more like something from the dark ages. Yet, I know this is how women were (and are still) forced to live. Hosseinio should be praised for portraying this subject in such a magnificent and poignant manner.


message 4: by Perola (last edited Aug 25, 2016 01:22PM) (new) - rated it 3 stars

Perola I read this book sometime back, never imagined the brutal behaviour of men towards women could be so horrifying. Well! men have always exploited women since ages, be it western society or eastern... but this was something unimaginable.... Reminds of a friend, while at the university, an afghani by birth, his father got him admitted to a course at the univ knowing would loose him to the ongoing war if he remained in the country. Still remember how he would talk of his sisters, and how much he missed his folks. his name's Zabeer, BArch, batch '89. He always talked of the good things of his country , feel so touched now as I recall his pain, the pain he never let us know of. hey! Zabeer, if you ever read this do get in touch (perolain@gmail.com)


message 5: by Nirav (last edited Aug 25, 2016 01:22PM) (new) - rated it 4 stars

Nirav Vasa I read this book someday back, an eye opener and a window to the world that is still full of pains and brutalities. Never Imagined, this could be still part of the same earth. Amazing showcase of the Women of Afghanistan, who stood like a wall absorbing, fighting all the pains. Mariam and Laila would be immortal characters .........Great read...or a probably a great cultural journey....


Christine After I finished this book I would catch myself missing Mariam and wondering how Laila was doing. I don't think I've ever been so wrapped up in characters' lives before. They became friends!! Well done Mr. Hosseini


Norman I agree with all of your comments and can only add that any book that can genuinely make me cry (I lost it when Mariam read the letter from her father) has reached me at a level far beyond what most books do.


message 8: by Tressa (last edited Feb 07, 2008 11:22AM) (new) - rated it 5 stars

Tressa Christine, I agree. I kept thinking of Mariam and Laila like old friends. Mariam's sacrifice for the few people she loved and who loved her is unforgettable.

I don't remember ever hating a book character as much as I hated Mariam and Laila's husband. What a despicable man.

ETA: There is a wonderful audio version of this book read by Atossi Leoni. Funny how I mispronounced just about every foreign word in this book.


Paula I completely agree with every comment here but wonder if I could do what Mariam did. I know that if forced for protection, I would kill but just her selflessness of wanting to protect Laila and wanting a life for Laila and her children. I don't know if I would/could have, I probably would have chanced it and ran away. You'd wonder if predictions exsisted, if Mariam knew now what she didn't know than, if she would have made the same sacrifice for the pure love and respect of not taking that risk and chance. What Mariam did, in the book, I hold pure admiration for her.

This book gave me pure comfort in knowing that people do/can put others before themselves even if it means of a cruel death.


message 10: by Tressa (last edited Mar 28, 2008 10:49PM) (new) - rated it 5 stars

Tressa I think about Mariam a lot. She's one of the most memorable characters I've read in the past ten years.

I think if we look at it through Mariam's eyes and the only world she knew, I think we would do the same thing. It's just harder for us to comprehend such a sacrifice from the comforts of our own culture and country.

My favorite part of the book was how Mariam and Laila built their relationship inside their small house. The scene where Laila wakes to find a pile of baby clothes gets me verklempt everytime I think about it, especially knowing those clothes were for Marian's own baby that died.

I really feel grateful to Hosseini for allowing us a peek into the Afghan lifestyle during such turbulent times. Although I like The Kite Runner on so many levels, I think it pales in comparison to A Thousand Splendid Suns.


Melissa Norman, I agree. No book has broken me down like this one. I felt such loss for Mariam when she could not maintain her pregnancies and instead of having the support and love from her husband she was deemed worthless to him. Then when Laila was first introduced to her as another wife and pregnant so quickly I just about lost it. Although, I loved Laila, I could relate and understand the character of Mariam so well. For a man, Khaled Hosseini, knows how to write women characters. It was a amazing.


message 12: by Ross (new) - rated it 5 stars

Ross Bussell After reading this book, I read a book that is technically young adult but parallels this one in many respects. It's called Sold, by Patricia McCormick, just thought I'd throw that out there. A Thousand Splendid Suns was heartbreaking, infuriating, and historically/culturally informing all at once. It's one of the best books out there, and casts a more raw light on how women are treated in that part of the world.


Katharine I haven't quite finished this book -- maybe 20
pages left.

I am so very disappointed in it I could yell and
scream. I'm wondering if I was wrong about the
Kite Runner; that maybe it wasn't very good either
Maybe I just got caught up in his good job at
discription and the fascination of learning
about a diff culture & history.

I found this book, Thousand Suns, poorly written.
Rather superficial. There were glaring errors in
grammar and jarring transistions.
The discriptions...more I haven't quite finished this book -- maybe 20
pages left.

I am so very disappointed in it I could yell and
scream. I'm wondering if I was wrong about the
Kite Runner; that maybe it wasn't very good either
Maybe I just got caught up in his good job at
discription and the fascination of learning
about a diff culture & history.

I found this book, Thousand Suns, poorly written.
Rather superficial. There were glaring errors in
grammar and jarring transistions.
The discriptions were good, and the 'pictures' of
war were excellent, but overall I kept having the
feeling the book was written with an eye towards
making a "life time movie".

It probably doesn't deserve only one star and I
might change after finishing (or after discussing
at my book club) but only to two.


Sarah I loved this book. It was so honest and real. I was so enthralled with the lives of the charachters that I couldn't put it down either. I ama slow reader (only read a chapter a day ussually) and I had this one read in 3 days, but that was only because I HAD to put it down to go to work. I reccomend it to everyone.


Tressa Wow, Katharine. I don't know what to say. I've run into a few people who thought The Kite Runner was a little contrived, but still a good read. But I've never talked to anyone who thought A Thousand Splendid Suns wasn't an excellent story.

I usually notice grammar errors and chuckle when I see one (it's almost like spotting Waldo), but I don't remember any in ATSS. Maybe I was too entranced by the story? And it didn't feel like a Lifetime movie to me at all.

I'm sorry you didn't enjoy it, but literature is subjective so it's all good.

I'm interested in books you've read and considered excellent stories.


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