The 104 Book Challenge - 2011 discussion

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Rachel A's 2011 Book List

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message 1: by Rachel (new)

Rachel Archelaus (rachelandrews) | 15 comments 1. Illusions by Richard Bach Illusions, the Adventures of a Reluctant Messiah, by Richard Bach. This is the first of his books that I've read. I like the easy to follow story which expounds upon spiritual knowledge. Good, easy read.


message 2: by Jen (new)

Jen | 90 comments Rachel wrote: "1. Illusions by Richard Bach Illusions, the Adventures of a Reluctant Messiah, by Richard Bach. This is the first of his books that I've read. I like the easy to follow story which expounds upon ..."

OMG. I LOVE this book. A friend introduced it to me in high school. I've read it several times since...


message 3: by Rachel (new)

Rachel Archelaus (rachelandrews) | 15 comments 2.

Brave New World by Aldous Huxley Brave New World, by Aldous Huxley
I don't know how I managed to not read this until now. I've heard so much about it over the years. Maybe I need to process more before commenting but I was a little dismayed at the progression. John's conditioning kept him from being happy just as much as the civilized characters. Too pessimistic for me I suppose. Oh well, haha. I'm definitely glad I read it!


message 4: by Rachel (new)

Rachel Archelaus (rachelandrews) | 15 comments 3. On Dreams by Sigmund Freud On Dreams, Sigmund Freud (translated by James Strachey)
Very interesting book. I've only read a tiny bit of Freud's work and wouldn't have picked this up if it wasn't for the subject matter. His take on dreams is well laid out and was actually surprising. He does give validity to the use of ancient symbolism as a means of interpreting dreams. He also states that the most trivial parts of dreams are those which matter most- just as in waking life. It's a short book, and while basic, gives a very nice guide to further understanding such a major part of our lives.


message 5: by Rachel (new)

Rachel Archelaus (rachelandrews) | 15 comments 4. Othello (Folger Shakespeare Library) by William Shakespeare Othello, by William Shakespeare. A friend and I read this out loud and really got into character. It was SO much fun.


message 6: by Rachel (new)

Rachel Archelaus (rachelandrews) | 15 comments 5. The Garden of Eden by Ernest Hemingway The Garden of Eden, Ernest Hemingway. On my continued quest to read the classics, I picked this up at the library not knowing how I would like it. I am officially a Hemingway convert. The story was subversive and lovely with rich detail of the scenery and of David's stories. Highly recommended to anyone who loves fiction.


message 7: by Rachel (new)

Rachel Archelaus (rachelandrews) | 15 comments 6. E = Einstein by Donald Goldsmith E = Einstein. Well I guess today was the day of finishing up some books! Haha.. Here's my take on this one:

I did find most of this book fascinating from the scientific angle as well as getting to know his personality, but the book is somewhat redundant since so many author's essays are included. After the fifth or sixth explanation of the special theory of relativity I became a bit bored. The saving grace of the book is that just when you think a chapter is rehashing the same old stuff, something truly wonderful is there. I would recommend this book, just keep an open mind when you feel you are rereading parts.


message 8: by Rachel (new)

Rachel Archelaus (rachelandrews) | 15 comments Travels in the Scriptorium  by Paul Auster 7. Travels in the Scriptorium, by Paul Auster. Very nice short novel. I like the narrator's voice and how it's called a report. Also, that it's just one day and ends before dinner. Imaginative to say the least. I'll definitely be reading more Auster.


message 9: by Rachel (new)

Rachel Archelaus (rachelandrews) | 15 comments Jonathan Livingston Seagull by Richard Bach 8. Jonathon Livingston Seagull, by Richard Bach
A very nice reminder :)


message 10: by Rachel (new)

Rachel Archelaus (rachelandrews) | 15 comments Invisible by Paul Auster Invisible, by Paul Auster. SOOO good. I can't believe how much I enjoyed this book. Just fantastic. I don't want to spoil anything by giving away how it was written. Just take my word for it...good stuff.


message 11: by Rachel (new)

Rachel Archelaus (rachelandrews) | 15 comments Collected Prose Autobiographical Writings, True Stories, Critical Essays, Prefaces, and Collaborations with Artists by Paul Auster 10. Collected Prose of Paul Auster. Fantaaaaastic!


message 12: by Rachel (new)

Rachel Archelaus (rachelandrews) | 15 comments 12. Leviathan (Contemporary American Fiction) by Paul Auster Leviathan, Paul Auster. I'm on an Auster kick and loving it! I do need to catch up on my reading though, waaaaay behind. This book was amazing from the first sentence to the last.


message 13: by Rachel (new)

Rachel Archelaus (rachelandrews) | 15 comments 13. The Brooklyn Follies by Paul Auster The Brooklyn Follies by Paul Auster. So funny, I laughed out loud repeatedly. Loved it.


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