The Mystery, Crime, and Thriller Group discussion

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Favorite Authors/Books/Series > Favourite crime novel

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message 1: by Chris (new)

Chris Stanley (christinelstanley) | 44 comments My favourite would have to be The Redemption of Alexander Seaton by Shona McLean. It's set in 17th century Scotland and if you like it, there is a sequel.


message 2: by Paul (last edited Jan 24, 2011 09:10AM) (new)

Paul  Perry (pezski) | 233 comments hey Damian

i've got A Drink Before The War lined up on my READ IMMEDIATELY shelf, and the next two in the series elsewhere.

pick. one. book.

that's like picking a favourite song, even narrowed down to a single genre it is so difficult, and will probably get different answers every day.

the best crime novel i've read recently is Child 44 by Tom Rob Smith, but i may come back tomorrow with a different answer ;D


message 3: by Gatorman (new)

Gatorman | 7679 comments "Child 44" was excellent as was the second in the series, "The Secret Speech".


message 4: by Doreen (new)

Doreen Dalesandro (agilecairn) | 43 comments Gatorman wrote: ""Child 44" was excellent as was the second in the series, "The Secret Speech"."

I listened to Child 44 a short time ago. I thought it was great!


message 5: by Hayes, Co-Moderator (new)

Hayes (hayes13) | 2060 comments Mod
I have a lot of favorites, but they are all by the same author! But of them all my favorite is Murder Must Advertise by Dorothy L. Sayers. It's a send up of the advertising industry in the 1930s and is very well portrayed. Sayers draws on her own experience as a copywriter and it's very funny in a lot of places.


message 6: by Hayes, Co-Moderator (new)

Hayes (hayes13) | 2060 comments Mod
I loved the early ones too, but I love all of those "old time" mysteries, the period, the style, the language.


message 7: by Britney (new)

Britney (tarheels) | 125 comments My favorite book has been The Chamber by John Grisham. Not only does it talk about the crime but it also talks about the electric chair. I would recommend it to everyone.


message 8: by Kim (last edited Jan 27, 2011 01:03AM) (new)

Kim (kimmr) Hayes wrote: "I have a lot of favorites, but they are all by the same author! But of them all my favorite is Murder Must Advertise by Dorothy L. Sayers. It's a send up of the advertis..."

Hi there. I'm new to this group. I love a whole range of crime fiction, but Dorothy Sayers is a particular favourite of mine too. Although it's been a while since I last read them, I especially love Gaudy Night and Busman's Honeymoon.


message 9: by Pam (new)

Pam (pam53) | 8 comments Grisham's chamber is one of my favs, too. I will need to think on my favorite of all time? I could not finish Child 44. I really like Elizabeth George and her Inspector Lynley series


message 10: by Merrill (new)

Merrill Heath | 61 comments I'm a big Elmore Loenard fan and I think Killshot is my favorite; although, I haven't read any of his work that I didn't enjoy.

Merrill Heath
Alec Stover Mysteries


message 11: by Eric (new)

Eric Christopherson | 23 comments My all-time favorite would be The Maltese Falcon by Dashiell Hammett. In more recent times my fave would be Silent Joe by T. Jefferson Parker, and the best crime novel I've read in the past year would be Cormac McCarthy's No Country for Old Men.


message 12: by Leonora (new)

Leonora Shahon Oh my...this thread is giving me soo many books to read. I am fairly new to this genre but I have fallen head over heals for mystery. I am completely hooked!


message 13: by Jill (last edited Feb 12, 2011 09:46AM) (new)

Jill Hutchinson (bucs1960) I have so many favorites that it is hard to pick one.....but I think that Death Walks in Eastreppsby Francis Beeding is right up there near the top of my list. (Beeding was the nom de plume of two authors, Hilary Saunders and John Palmer.)


message 14: by Eric (new)

Eric Christopherson | 23 comments Leonora wrote: "Oh my...this thread is giving me soo many books to read. I am fairly new to this genre but I have fallen head over heals for mystery. I am completely hooked!"

Head over HEALS (not "heels") as in scumbags? Was that intentional or a Freudian slip?


message 15: by Leonora (new)

Leonora Shahon Eric,
Totally a Freudian slip. Although "heals" is on my kid's spelling list and we had been practicing a lot before I posted. Must have just been on my mind! :)


message 16: by Jill (new)

Jill Hutchinson (bucs1960) My favorite series are the (1)Nero Wolfe mysteries....have read all of them. An eccentric sleuth, and (2) the Dalziel/Pascoe books. Hmmmmm, both series have a fat man as the major character....I wonder if that means something?


message 17: by Elizabeth (new)

Elizabeth (elizabeth8921) | 7780 comments Semilla Sense of Snow by Peter Hoeg


message 18: by Jeremy (new)

Jeremy Spaulding The Guards by Ken Bruen


message 19: by Avisek (new)

Avisek Bandyopadhyay | 54 comments In cold blood..it actually puts you inside the head of murderers...and they start to play games..where you are left wondering if you are burning up in anger or actually sympathizing with their deformed sense of world..


message 20: by Tiana (new)

Tiana | 5 comments My favorite 3 books that are mystery are "True Colors" by Krisitn Hannah and "Shine" by Lauren Myracle with the book "The Season" by Sarah MacLean. They both have murders and hate crimes. They show mystery and hate combined with lots of twists and true love. They are some of the best books I have ever read.


message 21: by Georgia (new)

Georgia | 537 comments Hi Awesomesister, never heard of the 3 authors you listed. I will have to read them soon. I wrote them down. That is what is fun about Goodreads, get to know what people think about different books, exposes you to
new authors,etc.
Also this is for Britney, You will have to read The Confession by John Grisham Boy, does Grisham get his point across about the death penalty. He makes you question your beliefs. Hard to decide whether it is a great book or a frustrating book. Felt like throwing it against the wall a few times.


message 22: by Tiana (new)

Tiana | 5 comments Hi Georgia. I don't get how a book can be good and frustuating at the same time? If it's good I continue reading it. If it's not good I go to the end, and find out evreything. The book you reconmendend I will have to check it out. It looks intresting. I will definitly get back to you after I read it.


message 23: by Tay (new)

Tay | 261 comments Anything by Michael Connelly. I can't decide which one.


message 24: by Lori (new)

Lori Baldi | 8 comments I was speaking with a family member and we discuss our reading habits along with favorites. We enjoy different types of books and she is hitting a wall needing to find other authors. I try to interest her in my books but after speaking with her I think I find where our differences lie. Her favorite writers are the Kellermans, Jonathan & Faye. She describes their writing as a story where you are riding down a river or stream with twists and turns and gasps of fear but all coming to a satisfying conclusion. The latest book I tried for her she could not grasp -- Case Histories. This book is my own particular favorite type of book where you feel as if you are peeling an onion. One layer is removed when you come across another and another and another. You may see the opposing viewpoints. My mission is to try to find an author that will be satisfactory for her where an author is as good as the Kellermans with a bit of a straight forward story line. She also avoids period pieces so no historicals. Any ideas?


message 25: by Tom (new)

Tom Vater (goodreadscomtom_vater) | 17 comments Death's Dark Abyss by Massimo Carlotto or Eye of the Beholder by Mark Behm. You won't find either in the local super book store. The latter might even be out of print. Here are my thoughts on the Carlotto.

If this slight novel (Original title: L’oscura immensita della morte, 2004) by Massimo Carlotto, the master of Italian Noir, is anything to go by, then European crime fiction is in a killer shape. Carlotto’s tale of a man who has lost his wife and child in an armed robbery gone wrong stands our perception of good and evil on its head and throws a glaring light on the heartlessness of Berlusconi’s Italy.

Silvano, the story’s victim, is a broken man. Following the senseless death of his loved ones, he gives up his high flying job and safe, middle class life to become a human shell who makes keys and fixes shoes in a shopping center, waiting for his time to run out, unable to overcome his grief. But when he hears that Raffaello, the killer who’s doing time for his family’s murder has cancer and is asking for clemency to be allowed to die a free man, he sees his chance for revenge and has high hopes that he will be able to track down a never apprehended accomplice of the crime that destroyed his life. With Raffaello out on the streets, Silvano uses the terminally ill gangster, his mother, a cop, a priest and a high society socialite with a guilt chip on her shoulder to track down the alleged accomplice.

The story is told by alternating protagonists, with Raffaello wanting to make the most of the time he has left and Silvano not caring for his life (not that of anyone else) which ended with the death of his wife and child. The violence unleashed by the victim is epic, repulsive and understandable, as conventional morality is stood on its head by extreme suffering. Soon, the reader is led into the darkest corners of Silvano’s mind where revenge and mayhem thrive, fester and burst forth.

The protagonists, all too real in both their humanity and monstrosity, show a healthy capacity for cruelty, as well as, in unexpected ways, for kindness. In the end, the reader is left with some of the incredible pain that all human beings endure as a consequence of their decisions which somehow never pan out the way they planned. This is what makes Death’s Dark Abyss a truly frightening and disturbing text. Carlotto does that rare thing, telling it like it is.

Incidentally, the author’s history reads like one of his novels. Massimo Carlotto, a left wing activist in his younger years, was framed by Italian police for a murder he did not commit, went on the run to South America and France, eventually turned himself in to Italian authorities and did five years in jail. In one of the biggest cases of miscarriage of justice in Italy, Carlotto, thanks to a long campaign by his supporters, eventually received a presidential pardon in 1993. Hardboiled indeed.


message 26: by Joan (new)

Joan (majopau) Probably Messiah by Bob Starling Messiah by Boris Starling


message 27: by Sue (new)

Sue while they may seem outmoded now, Agatha Christie's The Murder of Roger Ackroyd and Patricia Highsmith's the Talented Mr Ripley were tipping points in crime fiction and should be on your list if you are serious about the genre


message 28: by Richard (new)

Richard (richard-snow) | 18 comments Britney wrote: "My favorite book has been The Chamber by John Grisham. Not only does it talk about the crime but it also talks about the electric chair. I would recommend it to everyone."

Boy! Did you see the film "The Green Mile" about what happens in an electric chair execution when it goes wrong. (And actually even when they go "right"?) It certainly put me off reading anything more to do with that subject. I don't have the stomach for it.


message 29: by VickiLee (new)

VickiLee | 483 comments Sue wrote: "while they may seem outmoded now, Agatha Christie's The Murder of Roger Ackroyd and Patricia Highsmith's the Talented Mr Ripley were tipping points in crime fiction and should be on your list if yo..."

I totally agree with you. While thinking over mysteries that had a tremendous impact on me, I immediately thought of `The Murder of Roger Ackroyd' and `Then there Were None'. Those books threw a wrench into the pattern a mystery novel was expected to follow.


message 30: by [deleted user] (new)

It's funny I always watch mysteries on television but when I read books it was most often historical romance and things like that. What was I thinking?? After recently joining this group I've been trying to get familiar with the different authors of this genre. There are so many to choose from that it is making my head spin! Just finished "Gone Girl" and am now reading a MIchael Crichton and a Jeffrey Deaver novel with a half a dozen waiting in line....


message 31: by Val (new)

Val (valz) | 1542 comments Lori wrote: "It's funny I always watch mysteries on television but when I read books it was most often historical romance and things like that. What was I thinking?? After recently joining this group I've b..."
Yes, there are a lot of really good mysteries and thrillers awaiting you! Dark Places by Gillian Flynn is really good.


message 32: by Val (new)

Val (valz) | 1542 comments John wrote: "Though more about human relationships than crime, per se, my favorite is "The Last Juror" by John Grisham."

True, but I wish there would be another book about Libby Day as she is one of my favorite protagonists.


message 33: by Richard (new)

Richard (richard-snow) | 18 comments One of the reasons I like John le Carre is that being mostly psychological, his spy novels can translate to the screen without all the "smash bash crash" elements of some so-called thrillers. The best ids probably ' a perfect spy' about a spook who was raised by a conman father, and how it influenced the son to have no regard etc for lying and deceiving as an adult.

Richard Snow
(Author, 'Fire Damage', a terrorism thriller.)


message 34: by Kaci (new)

Kaci | 12 comments The Poet by Michael Connelly is by far my favorite. Wore out my first copy I read it so many times.


message 35: by Eric (new)

Eric (ericryd) Great call on The Poet! I read it a long time ago and it has always been one of my favorite. I've finally gone back to Michael Connelly and reading everything in order.


message 36: by Carla (new)

Carla Krueger (carlahkrueger) | 19 comments This is a great thread & I'm enjoying reading through.
Personally, I love James Ellroy's books, particularly 'The Black Dahlia'. He's got that snappy style and it really stops you putting the books down. I thought the film version was excellent, too, in that case.
Has anyone tried his 2009 novel, 'Blood's A Rover'? Need to hunt out some reviews . . .


message 37: by Carla (new)

Carla Krueger (carlahkrueger) | 19 comments Hi Damian, Just to reiterate my previous post, I recommend James Ellroy to you! His 1987 novel The Black Dahlia is brilliant!
The Black Dahlia
Hope it's one you haven't already read!
Amaya


message 38: by Tay (new)

Tay | 261 comments Kaci wrote: "The Poet by Michael Connelly is by far my favorite. Wore out my first copy I read it so many times."

love that book!


message 39: by Georgia (new)

Georgia | 537 comments Is there anyone out there who doesn't love Michael
Connelly's Books. I have read 9 of his books. I liked the Poet alot but loved the Lincoln Lawyer. Even the movie was good!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!


message 40: by Tania (new)

Tania | 2 comments any of the early works of Michael Connolly.


message 41: by Susan from MD (new)

Susan from MD | 58 comments Wow, what a hard question!

For pure "crime" I guess I would say And Then There Were None and Smilla's Sense of Snow - I really enjoyed both. For more of an international crime spin, Eye of the Needle is one of my favorites.

If I'm in the mood for a crime novel, I will probably pick up any of the PD James Dalgliesh series or the Nero Wolfe books - all are great reads.


message 42: by Cathy (new)

Cathy DuPont (cathydupont) | 132 comments Amaya wrote: "Hi Damian, Just to reiterate my previous post, I recommend James Ellroy to you! His 1987 novel The Black Dahlia is brilliant!
The Black Dahlia
Hope it's one you haven't already read!
Amaya"


Great choice, Amaya.


message 43: by Lynne (new)

Lynne Scott | 29 comments Rules of Prey by John Sandford. All of the Prey books are good. Sandford, like Connolly is on my regular buy list.


message 44: by Dawn (new)

Dawn Whidden (dawn71753) DeMille, Sandford. Seaver,Thomas Block


message 45: by [deleted user] (new)

I enjoy the Sanford series as well. Up to Invisible Prey.


message 46: by Sharon (new)

Sharon Michael | 674 comments Sandford is definitely one of my established favorite authors ... Robert Parker was another. Thomas Perry is another whose books I will always read, although he's a bit more 'hit and miss' for me than the other two were.


message 47: by Mira (new)

Mira (mirarad) Love all the authors/books mentioned above. Have a read a lot of them and now have put a lot of them on my TBR shelf! But has anyone read 'Beach Road' by James Patterson? I loved that book!!


message 48: by Trina (new)

Trina Reid | 3 comments I read that one a while ago. I love anything by James Patterson. My new love is Michael Bennett series.


message 49: by [deleted user] (new)

Who is Seaver?


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