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Kazuo Ishiguro
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message 1: by Melissa (new)

Melissa Storm (melstorm) Does anyone else just love Kazuo Ishiguro?

I run a 300+ member book club in Ann Arbor that is based off the list of 1001. We meet twice a month which can be a lot, but I just couldn't help myself from establishing one meeting where we discussed all of the wonderful works by Ishiguro that are featured on our list.

Sadly, I haven't seen the film version of "Never Let Me Go" yet, but I'll get there one day.

I've written reviews for "Never Let Me Go" and "The Remains of the Day" for my literary blog (I have the insane goal of not only reading, but reviewing, every book on the list. Each of my reviews features a plot summary and a list of reasons why a reader may like or dislike the book.

I hope you'll take a look!
Emlyn

Never Let Me Go: http://emlynchand.com/2010/12/23/book...
Remains of the Day: http://emlynchand.com/2010/12/23/book...


message 2: by Yassemin (new)

Yassemin (yas666) | 81 comments I do LOVE this guy. I have read two of his books; Never Let me go and Nocturnes, both superb. Particularly loved never let me go though and looking forward to seeing the film version which comes out here next month. Love being made aware of new blogs, definitely going to check it out! :)


message 3: by Melissa (new)

Melissa Storm (melstorm) Yay, thanks, Yas. I've read all of his list-books except for the Unconsoled. I need to get on that!


message 4: by Yassemin (new)

Yassemin (yas666) | 81 comments Well I need to read more of his to be honest. I've noticed some are avaliable for downloading onto the Kindle so definitely going to do so! :)


message 5: by Melissa (new)

Melissa Storm (melstorm) I recommend Pale View of Fire next.


message 6: by Yassemin (new)

Yassemin (yas666) | 81 comments Will look into it. Thanks!


message 7: by Drew (new)

Drew Billingsley | 58 comments Yes, I really love Ishiguro. Like Emlyn, I have read everything but The Unconsoled. I am planning to take that on a vacation in February, though. I didn't love When We Were Orphans, but have really liked all of his other works.


message 8: by Melissa (new)

Melissa Storm (melstorm) Ishiguro's actually one of my favorite contemporary authors along with Ian McEwan and Jonathan Safran Foer. We'll have to touch base, Drew, once we both read the Unconsoled.


message 9: by Anthony (new)

Anthony DeCastro | 167 comments Hey, has anyone heard...Emlyn runs a 300+ member book club in Ann Arbor and she has a blog? ;)

As for Ishiguro, I really enjoyed Remains of the Day and I have Never Let Me Go on Mt. TBR.... near the top.


message 10: by Melissa (new)

Melissa Storm (melstorm) Hi Tony. Nothing wrong with trying to get the word out, eh? Do you blog as well? BTW, Never Let Me Go is even better than the Remains of the Day--especially if you like Dystopia.


message 11: by Anthony (new)

Anthony DeCastro | 167 comments I was just teasing you...I think the first time is sorta ok, but after that just having the link to your blog in a signature is more appropriate.

I do have a blog.

I like dystopia and I like Ishi's prose, so I'm sure I'll like Never Let Me Go, when I get around to reading it.


message 12: by Melissa (new)

Melissa Storm (melstorm) Been on GoodReads for a while but am very new to the discussion boards. Thanks for the tip. I'll do the link in sig thing from now on. It's not my intention to come across as spammy. I love books and love talking to others who also love them.

Make sure to let us know how your experience with Never Let Me Go plays out. I like that you called Ishiguro, Ishi--makes him feel like an old friend :-P


message 13: by [deleted user] (new)

Jonathan Safran Foer is my favourite contemporary writer by a country mile, while it's a toss-up between Rushdie and Ishiguro for second place.

That said, I have read only two of Ishiguro's books- Remains of the Day and Never Let Me Go, and already count him among my favourites. Nocturnes is next on my wish-list. Let's see how that pans out.


message 14: by [deleted user] (new)

Emlyn wrote: "I recommend Pale View of Fire next."

Don't you mean 'A Pale View of Hills?


message 15: by Melissa (new)

Melissa Storm (melstorm) Oops, ha ha. It's been a while since I read it. I guess I'm confusing it with Nabokov's similarly titled novel.

I love what I've read of Foer as well. Big fan of Magical Realism.


message 16: by [deleted user] (new)

Nabokov is my favourite writer, as my display name would tell you, and am a big fan of Magical Realism as well. Boy, this is getting creepy :)

I'd love to read your blog. Could you send me the link?


message 17: by Melissa (new)

Melissa Storm (melstorm) Of course, with the utmost pleasure! My blog is www.emlynchand.com. I'm in the process of building a second more elaborate blog, but that's not yet ready for public scrutiny.

Let me know what you think,
Emlyn


message 18: by [deleted user] (new)

Sure thing.


message 19: by Amanda (new)

Amanda I'm almost finished with my first Ishiguro. I've had a copy of Remains of the Day on my bookshelf for years, but with the upcoming film adaptation of Never Let me Go I seemed to have an excellent incentive to dip into his work. I have to say that at first the narration seemed a bit dry - but now I'm rather impressed. There are so many ways to read Never Let Me Go; as a metaphor for the human treatment of animals, as an exploration of the exploitation of humans globally, or as a reminder of how easy it is to turn a blind-eye to the injustices of our own community, especially when we have something to gain by it. A lot of readers seem to come away disillusioned and unaffected, but I have to admit that Ishiguro has me thinking.


message 20: by [deleted user] (new)

I think Ishiguro's style takes getting used to. I remember giving up on Remains Of The Day after just 20odd pages the first time I read it. Once I got past the initial bump, though, I got hooked and went on to read three of his novels in the next 2 months. I am expecting a lot from Never Let Me Go, the film- partly because I loved the book and partly because I loved the film adaption of Remains Of the Day.


message 21: by Melissa (new)

Melissa Storm (melstorm) Let me know how you like the film. I'm not huge on movies, so I haven't seen it. Maybe one day...


message 22: by Ruth Wilson (new)

Ruth Wilson | 9 comments I'm almost done with "Never Let Me Go." It made Time Magazine's Top 100 Novels list, which is how I came across it. I have also had the similar problem Cincinnatusc mentioned above with reading "Remains of the Day," so I don't follow Kazuo Ishiguro as a rule. I absolutely loved the film of "Remains," but can't get the voice right in my mind while I'm reading.

Sometimes, I have a difficult time coming to a book AFTER the movie. For example, I am so glad I read "The English Patient" before I saw the movie. I love both, but they are totally different experiences. The book would be ruined by the movie if you did it in reverse, I feel. I didn't have that problem with "Gone With Wind," but when I can, I try to make sure and read the book first.


message 23: by Leonard (new)

Leonard (leonardseet) | 24 comments Cincinnatusc wrote: "I think Ishiguro's style takes getting used to. I remember giving up on Remains Of The Day after just 20odd pages the first time I read it. Once I got past the initial bump, though, I got hooked an..."

Ishiguro's style definitely takes a bit of time to get use to and for Remains of the Day, it take some time to realize the irony, because of the unreliable narrator. But once we soak in the moods of Ishiguro's novels, we enter into another world.


message 24: by Mikela (new)

Mikela | 378 comments Read Never Let Me Go and really enjoyed it so thought I'd read The Remains of the Day. I'm half way through and am gritting me teeth trying to force myself to finish it. I know it has rave reviews and is highly rated but I find it boring, boring, boring.


message 25: by Ana-Maria (new)

Ana-Maria Bujor (marabujor) "Never let me go" is on of the books that had the biggest impact on me - not sure why, but it remained with me long after reading. The movie was surprisingly good, as I expected it to be a disappointment. I have only read a short version of the "Remains of the day" and I don't think I'm going for the original, at least not for now.


message 26: by Mikela (new)

Mikela | 378 comments Ana-Maria wrote: ""Never let me go" is on of the books that had the biggest impact on me - not sure why, but it remained with me long after reading. The movie was surprisingly good, as I expected it to be a disappoi..."

Please don't let me put you off this book because either it got better or I did. Started to understand the main character and what the author was saying. Although it is not an action packed book I did end up enjoying it. Not as much as Never Let Me Go but much more than I thought I would at the beginning.


message 27: by Lisa (new)

Lisa (anzlitlovers) I found it interesting to see how many, and which departures from the book there were in the film. See http://anzlitlovers.wordpress.com/200...


message 28: by Ellie (new)

Ellie (elliearcher) My favorite Kazuo Ishiguro is When We Were Orphans. But I love his writing even when it is somewhat painfully slow moving, as in The Remains of the Day: Complete & Unabridged or a little simplistic, imho, as in Never Let Me Go. My favorite is a book I have been (so far) unable to finish: The Unconsoled-it's ridiculous & frustrating but I so adore the writing that it's my favorite (and I keep going at it-someday I will finish it! lol).


message 29: by Anu (last edited Sep 16, 2011 11:22AM) (new)

Anu (anu_datta) I have just finished Never let me go and I've fallen in love with the book...
What book should I read next?
Any suggestions?


message 30: by Mikela (new)

Mikela | 378 comments Ellie wrote: "My favorite Kazuo Ishiguro is When We Were Orphans. But I love his writing even when it is somewhat painfully slow moving, as in [book:The Remains of the Day: Complete & ..."

Ellie, got a kick out of your description of The Unconsoled because I'm about 60% done and haven't a clue what it's about. Am also enjoying his writing and have faith that I'll eventually clue in but it better happen fairly quickly as I'm starting to have doubts of my sanity here.


message 31: by Nicholas (new)

Nicholas Beck | 6 comments Mikela wrote: "Ellie wrote: "My favorite Kazuo Ishiguro is When We Were Orphans. But I love his writing even when it is somewhat painfully slow moving, as in [book:The Remains of the Da..."

Another 200 pages to go and I'm loving it although paradoxically it is quite dull but that's the point.

So far on a maybe superficial level I'm struck by how he's portraying the veneer of social niceties via the painfully protracted conversations various characters have with each other and what lies hidden.

Ryder's veneer of the accomplished celebrity happy to help and attend to the town's every request is at this point in the novel starting to peel at the edges and reveal his anger/frustration,inability to communicate to his son etc. Lots going on here and the novel is well worth persevering with.


message 32: by Rachel (new)

Rachel I love him! I read Never Let Me Go in my English class this year. His novels really make me think. I plan on reading Remains of the Day Next, too.


message 33: by Ann Helen (new)

Ann Helen (bergenslabb) | 4 comments I've read Never Let Me Go, The Remains of the Day and A Pale View of Hills and all of them were great. Along with Philippe Claudel and Louis de Bernières, Ishiguro is my favourite contemporary author. Next on my Ishiguro reading list is An Artist of the Floating World or possibly The Unconsoled, although you have made me a bit apprehensive about starting that one.


message 34: by Kathleen (new)

Kathleen (missbelgravia) Ann Helen wrote: "I've read Never Let Me Go, The Remains of the Day and A Pale View of Hills and all of them were great. Along with Philippe Claudel and Louis de Bernières, Ishiguro is my favourite contemporary auth..."

The Unconsoled is wonderful! A unique experience, and for me the ultimate expression of Ishiguro's genius. Don't be apprehensive.


message 35: by Arukiyomi (new)

Arukiyomi | 270 comments I agree. The Unconsoled was the most surprising novel I'd read in a very long time. It reads like a 500 page dream. Beautiful.


message 36: by Ann Helen (new)

Ann Helen (bergenslabb) | 4 comments Well, now I'm thinking my next Ishiguro will be The Unconsoled. I hope I'll love it as much as the two of you do. Ishiguro has not disappointed yet.


message 37: by Kev (new)

Kev Bickerdike (kevbickerdike) I read Never Let Me Go as the final text of my first year English Degree and loved it. I used it as the basis of my final essay, and plan to do some more writing on it. The novel worked well with other texts we studied, such as Frankenstein and The Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, in terms of transformation and notions of 'being human', but my particular interest was how the novel reminded me of elements of Blade Runner and, of course, Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep.
I'll definitely be reading more Ishiguro.


message 38: by Aubrey (new)

Aubrey (korrick) | 162 comments Ishiguro's one of my absolute favorites. I've read and loved Never Let Me Go and The Remains of the Day, and really liked An Artist Of The Floating World. I plan on reading the rest of his books in the future.


message 39: by Laura (new)

Laura | 149 comments I loved Remains of the Day and recently bought Never Let Me Go which I plan on reading soon


message 40: by Kirsten (new)

Kirsten  (kmcripn) I just finished reading The Buried Giant The Buried Giant by Kazuo Ishiguro by Kazuo Ishiguro. I'd never read any of his books before. I'm definitely going to read more of his work after this delightful book! I highly recommend it!

https://www.goodreads.com/review/show...


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