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Contemporary Art

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message 1: by Carol (new)

Carol (goodreadscomcarolann) | 1140 comments
Kathy Kelley, a graduate of University of Houston (MFA - 2006), creates large-scale sculpture via found objects. Drawing from such sources as Eva Hesse and Louise Bourgeois, Kelley forges a visual discourse that touches upon feminism, environmentalism and process-oriented concerns.









WHO DO YOU NAME AMOUNG YOUR INFLUENCES?
KK: Eva Hesse, Louise Bourgeois, Lee Bontecou, Robert Morris, Richard Serra, Robert Rauschenberg, Jean Baudrillard, Mother Teresa.

DESCRIBE YOUR WORK IN 5 WORDS.
KK: Raw, Feminine, Humanizing, Decay, Refuse.

WHAT INSPIRES YOU?
KK: I hide my own culpability in consumer whoring. Yet my collecting, harvesting, and acquiring has been redirected to objects of decay found along the street side. I am drawn to the symbolic and formal elements of decay, the way in which an object has been altered by its mere existence. The worn, broken, torn nature of the aged object seems to make it more real, more honest. So I collect decayed urban refuse. I hold onto it for awhile. Cogitate. Eventually the formal and symbolic elements of the materials and my current research meld. Then I make.

The making is a visceral reaction against the cult of the instant, the new, the forever young, forever fertile with its pushed up breast and swollen lips, a reaction against perpetual numbness, defense mechanisms of self enclosure. Cognitively, emotionally, I am a full participant in our capital culture. But I find myself making, assembling, revaluing objects of refuse, moving from spectation toward production, not mechanized but sensualized by the hand, by my hand. Mind and body working in rebellion, in synch; the nonsense and sense merge as coherent objects. The sculptural constructs become a stand in for the shadow self, an empty self.

WHAT DOES A DAY-IN-THE-LIFE LOOK LIKE IN YOUR STUDIO?
KK: Writing. Making. Sweating. Lifting. Being horribly dirty.

http://www.kathykelley.net/


message 2: by Ruth (new)

Ruth | 1957 comments At first glance, Lee Bontecu immediately came to mind.


message 3: by Carol (new)

Carol (goodreadscomcarolann) | 1140 comments Athena Tacha
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Born in Larissa, Greece (1936) is best known in the fields of environmental public sculpture and conceptual art, but has also worked extensively in photography, film and artists’ books. In the photo above she is standing in front of her "36 Years of Aging."

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Connections, 1981-92, Philadelphia, aerial view 2009

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Dancing Steps amphitheater and Star Fountain (aerial view), Muhammad Ali Plaza, Louisville, KY


Friendship Plaza with Light Obelisk Fountain (aerial view), Wisconsin Place, Bethesda, DC/MD


WWW-Tower", day and night (animated LEDs), Wisconsin Place, Bethesda, DC/MD

http://www.oberlin.edu/faculty/atacha...

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message 4: by Carol (new)

Carol (goodreadscomcarolann) | 1140 comments Artist Karen Jurick --
I can relate to this, it's really interesting to watch how visitors view the artworks.
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http://web.mac.com/kjurick/ZemArt/Wel...


message 5: by Monica (last edited Feb 06, 2011 07:38AM) (new)

Monica | 909 comments Carol wrote: "Athena Tacha

Born in Larissa, Greece (1936) is best known in the fields of environmental public sculpture and conceptual art


Love "CONNECTIONS" in Philly!
Road Trip!


message 6: by Monica (new)

Monica | 909 comments Carol wrote: "Artist Karen Jurick --
I can relate to this, it's really interesting




I like!







http://web.mac.com/kjurick/ZemArt/Wel..."


Rick-Founder JM CM BOOK CLUB  | 57 comments Love this group!!! so many great threads
I have to admit that I am not a fan of modern or contemporary art- much of it ..to me!! - is quite simplistic and lacks the technical skills of the landscape and portrait realists- and I include Mondrian in this. I feel he is the most overated artist in history- any 5 year old with a ruler and and blue, red and yellow crayons can do a Mondrian tic-tac-toe work..now this is just my opinion!! no offense to Mondrian fans!!


message 8: by John (new)

John David (nicholasofautrecourt) That sort of reminds me of the old "Any five-year old can do what Jackson Pollock does" canard. I call bull. Show me a Pollock and show me your five-year old's scribbling, and I guarantee I can tell you the difference.


message 9: by Xime (new)

Xime Hr (ximehr) | 3 comments I think the phrase "any 5 year old kid can do that" will pop out in any contemporary art conversation and I think its natural... and I think is common since the impressionists when nobody would accept them, not after all the classical painting that was around. Rick, I think that if you want to enjoy more Contemporary Art all you have to do is stare at the piece and let your ideas fly... you know... think about the process of the piece, the ideology, all the possible meanings, the message, the confrontation, your emotion... I am no expert but I have always found Contemporary Art a bit like conceptual art it is no longer only what you see or what it is presented but how, when, where....


message 10: by Ruth (last edited Feb 06, 2011 01:02PM) (new)

Ruth | 1957 comments Rick wrote: "Love this group!!! so many great threads
I have to admit that I am not a fan of modern or contemporary art- much of it ..to me!! - is quite simplistic and lacks the technical skills of the landsca..."


Technical skills are not what art is all about. Saying that is like saying being able to hammer a nail is the same as designing a cathedral.


Rick-Founder JM CM BOOK CLUB  | 57 comments I admit that the appreciate of abstract art is one that must be fostered in oneself- I have tried- but I am not about to claim that I like an art form if I do not- I have great respect for those who do feel a connection with such works..it simply has evaded me so far.


message 12: by Heather (new)

Heather | 8544 comments You know, I have well, I wouldn't say 'evolved', but my taste in art has come in 'phases'. I have been really interested in Renaissance, then Impressionism, then mannerism, fauvism, etc. and more and more into the abstract these days. I do have to say, Rick, that initially I didn't appreciate the abstract and contemporary, either. I'm not saying that you will or need to ever like it, I'm just sharing my cycles of artistic appreciation.


message 13: by Carol (new)

Carol (goodreadscomcarolann) | 1140 comments Rick, have you ever seen Contemporary in person? Or listen to the artist speak at the opening of their exhibit? Looking at art on the internet is not the same.


message 14: by Xime (new)

Xime Hr (ximehr) | 3 comments Haha Rick, it looks like we are trying to convince you!!! I agree with Heather, you don't have to like it... but you should give it a chance ;)


Rick-Founder JM CM BOOK CLUB  | 57 comments Ximena wrote: "Haha Rick, it looks like we are trying to convince you!!! I agree with Heather, you don't have to like it... but you should give it a chance ;)"

Carol wrote: "Rick, have you ever seen Contemporary in person? Or listen to the artist speak at the opening of their exhibit? Looking at art on the internet is not the same."

Heather wrote: "You know, I have well, I wouldn't say 'evolved', but my taste in art has come in 'phases'. I have been really interested in Renaissance, then Impressionism, then mannerism, fauvism, etc. and more a..."

I really have given it many chances- I recall goingto a "Pop" art exhibit at High Museum in Atlanta- while I enjoyed it- I certainly did not relate it to the intricacies of a Canneletto ora John Constable- I am most intrigued by Ximena's suggestion to "simply look" at the piece and allow themeaning to come naturally- perhaps I am thinking too much!


message 16: by Ruth (new)

Ruth | 1957 comments Perhaps some reading, or a course in Art History is in order. You can't expect to understand everything just by looking at it. Would you expect to "get" quadratic equations just by looking at them.


Rick-Founder JM CM BOOK CLUB  | 57 comments Ruth wrote: "Perhaps some reading, or a course in Art History is in order. You can't expect to understand everything just by looking at it. Would you expect to "get" quadratic equations just by looking at them."

I certainly agree a course in Art history would be greatly benefical to me- broadening my knowledge!


message 18: by Ruth (new)

Ruth | 1957 comments Here's the recommendation I made on the Surrealism thread.


Art HistoryArt History as a very readable 2 volume set on general art history. If it had been available when I was teaching I would have used it for my Art History course. Art History Art History by Marilyn Stokstad


Rick-Founder JM CM BOOK CLUB  | 57 comments Ruth wrote: "Here's the recommendation I made on the Surrealism thread.


Art HistoryArt History as a very readable 2 volume set on general art history. If it had been available when I was teaching I would have..."


thanks for the great reference, Ruth!


message 20: by Carol (new)

Carol (goodreadscomcarolann) | 1140 comments You'll learn a lot if you volunteer at an art museum!

For our training the required art history books I read were Stokstad's Art History (one volume when I purchased it in 2004) and American Art by Craven.


Rick-Founder JM CM BOOK CLUB  | 57 comments Carol wrote: "You'll learn a lot if you volunteer at an art museum!

For our training the required art history books I read were Stokstad's Art History (one volume when I purchased it in 2004) and American Art b..."


I have the VERY large coffee table books from just about all the great Museums- as well as many books on individual artists and Movements- but most are confined to what I am comfortable with- need to stretch the envelope!


message 22: by Ed (new)

Ed Smiley | 871 comments Anybody see Lesley Vance? Her work is abstract, gestural, but in the way she uses the paint, and in her palette, there is something old-masterly.


Rick-Founder JM CM BOOK CLUB  | 57 comments Ed wrote: "Anybody see Lesley Vance? Her work is abstract, gestural, but in the way she uses the paint, and in her palette, there is something old-masterly."

excellant link, Ed- truly unique works- I agree about the "old-Mastery" part- while abstract (which I do not cotton to) the brush-stokes and AMAZING use of color, texture and movement is wonderful!


message 24: by Heather (last edited Feb 10, 2011 04:40PM) (new)

Heather | 8544 comments I agree with Rick...excellent link! I really like her work, it evokes a lot of fluidity and emotion. Thank you for introducing her to me. Very nice!


Rick-Founder JM CM BOOK CLUB  | 57 comments Ed wrote: "Interesting link on Vhils:
http://www.buzzfeed.com/mathieus/scra..."


stunning!!!!


message 27: by John (new)

John David (nicholasofautrecourt) I'm glad my street doesn't have graffiti on it.


Rick-Founder JM CM BOOK CLUB  | 57 comments John wrote: "I'm glad my street doesn't have graffiti on it."

I guess so.........


message 29: by Rick-Founder JM CM BOOK CLUB (last edited Feb 20, 2011 10:45AM) (new)

Rick-Founder JM CM BOOK CLUB  | 57 comments John wrote: "I'm glad my street doesn't have graffiti on it."

while John does notappreciate the brilliance of the "graffiti" art- - I do- so sad that elitists cannot appreciate that some do not have the means to study at the Sorb. sad to see such mean spiritedness- Let us all remember that Keith Haring started as a Grafitti Artist


message 30: by John (new)

John David (nicholasofautrecourt) If I'm an elitist, does that mean that you're low-brow for not liking Gertrude Stein?

Keith Haring was never anything more than a graffiti artist. Just because you do it on a canvas doesn't make it any different.

"Mean spiritedness"? Whence?


message 31: by Monica (last edited Feb 20, 2011 04:30PM) (new)

Monica | 909 comments It says right in Heather's description of this forum that this is a place for "friendly discussion". There's lot's of artists around here and many of us like the look of graffiti. How about this neighborhood???
http://5ptz.com/graff/


message 32: by John (last edited Feb 20, 2011 04:36PM) (new)

John David (nicholasofautrecourt) Have my questions been anything other than friendly? As I recall, he was the one that called me "mean-spirited." How friendly is that?


message 33: by Ed (new)

Ed Smiley | 871 comments OK, let me hand out a pair of bushes loaded with some hard to wash out color, say Phthalo green, and you guys can take it outside, in the parking lot. Or, cans of Montana at 10 paces? LOL.


message 34: by John (new)

John David (nicholasofautrecourt) He's felt punchy for some time, Ed. It's beyond me.


message 35: by Monica (new)

Monica | 909 comments I DO NOT wish to prolong this but want mention I remember you reading something into a post of mine that wasn't there.

And what just happened with Pete?


message 36: by Heather (new)

Heather | 8544 comments Thank you, Monica, for bringing up my previous post.I don't want to point fingers at anyone. Let's just try to be respectful, especially of others' taste in art, everyone is allowed an opinion, but putting down another person's opinion is uncalled for. And now that we know our boundaries, let's let the past be the past and start from here.

BTW I love that site you posted, Monica!


Rick-Founder JM CM BOOK CLUB  | 57 comments Heather wrote: "Thank you, Monica, for bringing up my previous post.I don't want to point fingers at anyone. Let's just try to be respectful, especially of others' taste in art, everyone is allowed an opinion, but..."

appologies- just felt the member who posted the pic deserved a respectful response- or none at all- if one doesnt like "graffiti"
end of topic


message 38: by Jim (new)

Jim | 147 comments Art to me is art that captures a viewer's attention and causes the viewer to feel more alive/engaged, more of a connection with other human beings (past or present),more of a spark of their imagination and a greater sense of identity with their times/places.

Where the art is seems to me to be a minor consideration.


message 39: by Monica (new)

Monica | 909 comments I love that, Jim. It covers just about everything. And it doesn't apply just to contemporary art.


message 40: by Heather (new)

Heather | 8544 comments Monica wrote: "I love that, Jim. It covers just about everything. And it doesn't apply just to contemporary art."

Ditto!


message 41: by Carol (new)

Carol (goodreadscomcarolann) | 1140 comments Contemporary artist Xu Bin
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Blossoming Sakura in a Jar


Book from the Sky

bio - Born in Guangan, Sichuan province in 1969. Graduated from South-west Normal univercity. Xu is good at landscape paintings. His works feature fine lines and boldcomposition, with strong artistic appeal and decorativeness. He has visited the famous scenery of china in the pasted ten years, His landscapes, reputed for Chang Jiang (the longest and largest river in China), are especially fresh and lyrical. In recent years, he created his own art style by using a series of brighten colors, like Pink, Yellow, Green and Red, He expresses himself in various topics, such as Buddha, landscapes, flowers, and human figures, etc. Xu have held several exhibitions in Hong Kong, Canada, France since 2002 , which won his art high appreciations all over the world.


message 42: by Carol (new)

Carol (goodreadscomcarolann) | 1140 comments A reading room?
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Building Houses / Hiding Under Rocks by Aaron T Stephan, 2008 exhibit

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30 Columns, 2010


Vessels Absent, 2009


Lift, 2005


Pedantics, 2002

http://aarontstephan.com/section/1382...


message 43: by Ed (new)

Ed Smiley | 871 comments Some of these made me think of Edward Keinholz' The Beanery in the Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam. It is one of my favorite installations. Definitely see it if you are going to the Stedelijk Museum. It is a room sized environment and there is a sense of frozen time and the a layer of nostalgia and a kind of sweet dread. Not quite contemporary, it is from the 60's.

This will give you a little bit of an idea:








message 44: by Ruth (new)

Ruth | 1957 comments I've been in the real Beanery in Los Angeles, Ed.

And also seen Keinholz's Beanery in Amsterdam. I had no idea it was there, was just wandering around and bang, there it was. Like running into an old friend thousands of miles from home.


message 45: by Ed (new)

Ed Smiley | 871 comments Ruth wrote: "I've been in the real Beanery in Los Angeles, Ed.

And also seen Keinholz's Beanery in Amsterdam. I had no idea it was there, was just wandering around and bang, there it was. Like running into a..."


It was a fun time. As I remember there was a de Kooning show of recent work there too, and they had a video of him painting which was quite revelatory, one brush stroke, then move to a giant arm chair and look intensely, then go back and to another brush stroke and so on. Really flies in the face of what you think of as an action painter. (He was still alive back then, although I guess barely).

Anyway, just like you I ran into it. The guards were seemed to really love the Keinholz, they smiled and it made them happy to work near it.


message 46: by Jim (new)

Jim | 147 comments Thanks Carol for the Stephan link/material

I particularly liked VESSELS ABSENT and PEDANTICS in how the pieces communicate in such a fun and on-the-mark way different human attitudes.


message 47: by Ed (last edited Mar 19, 2011 08:07PM) (new)

Ed Smiley | 871 comments Laura Paulini is an artist who does very complex process work.


This painting, "Black Beauty", took her seven months, working about four days a week to paint all the stripes for the first layer. That’s approximately 8,150 stripes each month for a total of 57,000! She builds her acrylic and egg tempera paintings by applying the paint in rows and patterns of dots, each dot of paint painstakingly applied with the end of a chopstick.

A friend of mine interviewed her on her blog. There's more there, worth reading, showing the painting n process.


message 48: by Ed (new)

Ed Smiley | 871 comments Another member of the AbEx generation passed away recently, Karl Kasten, at the age of 94. A painter and a master printmaker.

There's two videos, taken when he was ninety, one with him discussing Cezanne and Gauguin, the other showing him working on ad pulling a plate.


message 49: by Heather (new)

Heather | 8544 comments Thank you so much, Ed, for sharing that. I have never heard of Laura Paulini before. I really like her work, and what a process. What patience and skill! Thank you for introducing her!


message 50: by Lorie (new)

Lorie (lorie_mccown) | 57 comments Ed wrote: "Interesting link on Vhils:
http://www.buzzfeed.com/mathieus/scra..."


Ed- I had missed this work! What an interesting concept here. Bas-relief work circa 2011. I love when someone does something clever with something we would just pass by. Thanks for the link.


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