Mr. Seibert's Reading Class discussion

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To Kill a Mockingbird

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message 1: by Mr. Seibert (new)

Mr. Seibert Seibert (aseibert) | 67 comments Mod
Chapters 1 and 2: We will begin posting nightly on Monday, January 10th. Until then, read through at least the second chapter!


message 2: by Nyree (new)

Nyree Modisette (nyreemodisette12348) | 63 comments Mr. Seibert wrote: "Chapters 1 and 2: We will begin posting nightly on Monday, January 10th. Until then, read through at least the second chapter!"

I read the second chapter, and I can't put this book down!


message 3: by Mr. Seibert (new)

Mr. Seibert Seibert (aseibert) | 67 comments Mod
In the first two chapters, the context of the setting is described. For instance, on page 23 the narrator mentions "the crash" which is a reference to the Great Depression of the 1930's. What other clues were there about the cultural context and how do you guys think the cultural context will play a role in the conflict?


message 4: by Mr. Seibert (new)

Mr. Seibert Seibert (aseibert) | 67 comments Mod
The narrator-Scout-is a very strong personality. How would you describe her so far in the book? Why describe her in this way?


message 5: by Mr. Seibert (new)

Mr. Seibert Seibert (aseibert) | 67 comments Mod
At its core, To Kill a Mockingbird is a "coming of age" story that weaves its conflict through the eyes of two kids growing up. What are your strongest memories from growing up--especially in the summer--in elementary school?
(Mine were all about hanging out with friends outside playing games like flashlight tag/capture the flag/riding bikes/sports/etc--I loved summers growing up!)


message 6: by Havelyn (new)

Havelyn (MiaBooBaby) | 69 comments Mr. Seibert wrote: "In the first two chapters, the context of the setting is described. For instance, on page 23 the narrator mentions "the crash" which is a reference to the Great Depression of the 1930's. What other..."


One clue that lead me to the conclusion of the cultural context was how they talk. For instance, when Jem said, "Sure you do. You hafta know about cows, they're a big part of life in Maycomb County." From my perspective the curltural context is the key to the entire book. Based off the first and second chapter, the teachers reaction to the students is part of the cultural context which lead me to believe that the cultural context is the key. I also strongely believe that because in present day we call our mothers "mom" and fathers "dad". In this particular book they call their dad by his real name which is very different from my knoweledge growing up.


message 7: by Havelyn (last edited Jan 10, 2011 04:44PM) (new)

Havelyn (MiaBooBaby) | 69 comments Mr. Seibert wrote: "The narrator-Scout-is a very strong personality. How would you describe her so far in the book? Why describe her in this way?"

Scout has an extremely unique personally because he doesn't take things from people he can't pay back. I believe that shows alot of intergity because he could have tooken the money that the teacher was giving him and never gave it back. He also could have easily made an excuse of why he couldn't pay her back but he did the smart thing and decided not to take it at all. That shows me alot about Scout. Even though he's a Cunningham he still could've did something different.

(For all the he's I met she lol) sorry


message 8: by Havelyn (new)

Havelyn (MiaBooBaby) | 69 comments Mr. Seibert wrote: "At its core, To Kill a Mockingbird is a "coming of age" story that weaves its conflict through the eyes of two kids growing up. What are your strongest memories from growing up--especially in the s..."

My strongest memory from growing up in elementary was being the best at everything, playing with friend, double dutching, singing, dancing 24/7, being captain of cheerleading, running around the house, playing ring around the rosey (ha ha), playing tag, riding bikes, and etc.


message 9: by Shyen (new)

Shyen Hardiman (ShyenHardiman) | 56 comments Havelyn wrote: "Mr. Seibert wrote: "At its core, To Kill a Mockingbird is a "coming of age" story that weaves its conflict through the eyes of two kids growing up. What are your strongest memories from growing up-..."

We still play Ring Around the Rosey ...l0l in gym ! but we still have alot in common !


message 10: by Mr. Seibert (new)

Mr. Seibert Seibert (aseibert) | 67 comments Mod
Havelyn wrote: "Mr. Seibert wrote: "The narrator-Scout-is a very strong personality. How would you describe her so far in the book? Why describe her in this way?"


This is good--but I think you got a bit confused--Scout is the narrator and is Atticus' daughter. Walter Cunningham is the boy she ends up bringing home for a meal!

Scout has an extremely unique personally becaus..."



message 11: by Mr. Seibert (new)

Mr. Seibert Seibert (aseibert) | 67 comments Mod
Scout is also a girl! I know we don't know that yet-just so you know, haha.


message 12: by Shyen (new)

Shyen Hardiman (ShyenHardiman) | 56 comments Mr. Seibert wrote: "In the first two chapters, the context of the setting is described. For instance, on page 23 the narrator mentions "the crash" which is a reference to the Great Depression of the 1930's. What other..."

I think the context will play a huge role in the book because things are way different now and it will kinda put us in their shoes. I think it will have a huge role in the book because things we do now might be the opposite from what we are doing now. I also think that the way the teachers are has a big role in the book .


message 13: by Shyen (new)

Shyen Hardiman (ShyenHardiman) | 56 comments Mr. Seibert wrote: "The narrator-Scout-is a very strong personality. How would you describe her so far in the book? Why describe her in this way?"

Scout- I would describe her as a follower of her brother. It seems as though her and her brother are very close. I think that will benefit her in the end when she gets older because her brother,jem, seems like a hard and diligent worker.


message 14: by Shyen (new)

Shyen Hardiman (ShyenHardiman) | 56 comments Mr. Seibert wrote: "At its core, To Kill a Mockingbird is a "coming of age" story that weaves its conflict through the eyes of two kids growing up. What are your strongest memories from growing up--especially in the s..."

My strongest memories from growing up is every summer taking a road trip out-of-state or to Indiana Beach with the WHOLE family or having a huge cook out for everybody's birthday that's in the summer time ( mine :) ) and always having to go to practice for track and cheer leading.


message 15: by Havelyn (new)

Havelyn (MiaBooBaby) | 69 comments Mr. Seibert wrote: "Havelyn wrote: "Mr. Seibert wrote: "The narrator-Scout-is a very strong personality. How would you describe her so far in the book? Why describe her in this way?"


This is good--but I think you..."

Hold on now im confused so Scout is the boy who the teacher was interacting with?


message 16: by Havelyn (new)

Havelyn (MiaBooBaby) | 69 comments Shyen wrote: "Havelyn wrote: "Mr. Seibert wrote: "At its core, To Kill a Mockingbird is a "coming of age" story that weaves its conflict through the eyes of two kids growing up. What are your strongest memories ..."

I know right Shyen but it's fun. You're like my little sister and yes we do.


message 17: by Mr. Seibert (new)

Mr. Seibert Seibert (aseibert) | 67 comments Mod
Havelyn wrote: "Mr. Seibert wrote: "Havelyn wrote: "Mr. Seibert wrote: "The narrator-Scout-is a very strong personality. How would you describe her so far in the book? Why describe her in this way?"

No Scout is the girl that the teacher was interacting with (she is a tomboy so she sounds like a boy in the descriptions)

This is g..."



message 18: by Anson (last edited Jan 10, 2011 06:47PM) (new)

Anson Blackburn | 39 comments Scouts personality is very strong like you said becuase she is very caring and a nice person.I say this because the way she wanted to cheer Jem up when he was down and had his little moments.Even though she knew not to bother him.

Q2


message 19: by Anson (last edited Jan 10, 2011 06:49PM) (new)

Anson Blackburn | 39 comments My strongest memories of elementary is going outside playing football with the neiborhood kids such as (Smear The Queer).Also spending nights over Deontea King-Shirley's house,staying up to 2o'clock in the morning playing games.

Q3


message 20: by Anson (new)

Anson Blackburn | 39 comments This book is really hard to keep up in but it is very interesting.


message 21: by Nyree (new)

Nyree Modisette (nyreemodisette12348) | 63 comments Mr. Seibert wrote: "In the first two chapters, the context of the setting is described. For instance, on page 23 the narrator mentions "the crash" which is a reference to the Great Depression of the 1930's. What other..." From the text, I can conclude that the cultural context will affect the way the characters interact with each other and their actions. The cultural context is that this is during the 1930's because, as Mr. Seibert mentioned, the narrator mentions about the Great Depression. This event left a huge burden on the American people. Several people were unemployed and left with little money. I believe this will explain why Little Chuck Little and his family are having financial issues. Another fact about the cultural context is that blacks and whites were not considered best friends. There weren't any conflicts with the two ethnic groups, but they did not interact with each other like we do now. This fact will also explain why Scout's teacher made that remark that her father was not teaching her the correct way to read or Calpurnia is not teaching Scout how to write correctly. The social trend during this time was by getting oral information from someone else or the newspaper. Scout mentioned that her father dealt with alot of people as a doctor and a legislature; therefore, he may know alot about certain people because he talk to them daily. I believe the cultural context will play a role in the story by the characters saying what they are saying and how the characters communicate with one another.
I have seen this already in the story. I gave a few examples above about the cultural context affecting the characters' ways. I also believe the cultural context may have an affect on the title of the story. I am unsure how this is possible, but I am certain I will find out as I read more of the book.


message 22: by Nyree (new)

Nyree Modisette (nyreemodisette12348) | 63 comments Mr. Seibert wrote: "The narrator-Scout-is a very strong personality. How would you describe her so far in the book? Why describe her in this way?" I believe Scout is a very strong, wise, and bold person. I say Scout is like this because of how she is described in the story. Also, Scout's actions demonstrates those characteristics. For example, Scout was beating up on Walter. That was hilarious to me because she is a girl and he is a boy. According to the text, Scout was really beating down Walter in the dirt. I believe if her brother did not stop her, then she just might have sent the poor boy to the hospital. Also, Scout is wise because she is in the first grade reading books that I could probably learn how to read in the fifth grade. I applaud Atticus for doing such a great job with Scout and Jem because they are very bright kids and starting at a young age is the best way for any child to learn how to do the basics. I say Scout is bold because she will not let a conversation fail if she does not put her input in. For example, Scout and Atticus were talking about how Scout need to go to school. Scout didn't want to go to school because of her teacher and all the chaos that was happening there. During the converstaion, Scout fought so hard to persuade Atticus to reconsider her for going to school. Though, Atticus did not change his mind, and the next day, Scout was at school. I can relate to Scout because I believe I'm bold in a way. I love debating, and I will not give up on anything. When I know I'm not doing my best or I can't do something, that makes me want to fight harder and try the activity and put my best effort in trying to succeed at the task. Scout is an amazing character, and she is why the story is so entertaining.


message 23: by Nyree (new)

Nyree Modisette (nyreemodisette12348) | 63 comments Mr. Seibert wrote: "At its core, To Kill a Mockingbird is a "coming of age" story that weaves its conflict through the eyes of two kids growing up. What are your strongest memories from growing up--especially in the s..."


message 24: by D'onte (new)

D'onte Montague | 41 comments other clues to the cultural conflict is that mid way through both chapter it talked how how the policeman did not want to but the radley boy in jailnext to the negros showing that this was the time of where balcks nd white were still seperated.my role in thisshow the new age of the world where in most part of the world blacks nd white are at a peaceful union


message 25: by D'onte (new)

D'onte Montague | 41 comments i would describe scout personality as as strong minded curious respectful and intelligent.(curious)i say this because in the story she asks her brother jem many questions about variety of things such as the meanings of words.(strong minded)i say this because she speaks up when no one else will she has not much care of how people percieve her if she doesnt want something to happen she has her ways of stopping it.(intelligent)she is the only one in her class who has been reading for a long time and is the only one who can read big lititure.(respectful)even when she was right she stpped and apoligized for what the teacher thougt she did


message 26: by D'onte (new)

D'onte Montague | 41 comments my favorite memory memory is from the summer when i went to the skating rink july12 2010 and i hun with all my freinds skating circles around people who couldnt keep up and kept falling i sat nd hung on the side of the dance floor with my freinds detron cierra yahniqua kayshiana kyle rayshena nd havelyn my favorite elementry memory is when i was getting chased by all the girls in second grade for hilarious reasons i used to clown all day back in the day


message 27: by Deandrea (new)

Deandrea Williams | 9 comments Mr. Seibert wrote: "In the first two chapters, the context of the setting is described. For instance, on page 23 the narrator mentions "the crash" which is a reference to the Great Depression of the 1930's. What other..."

another context clue I found was that when Scout stated ages like he is one year my senior, my conclusion was that maybe she was referring to high school. After rereading it I thought maybe she was talking about thier age.Am I correct?


message 28: by Deandrea (new)

Deandrea Williams | 9 comments Mr. Seibert wrote: "At its core, To Kill a Mockingbird is a "coming of age" story that weaves its conflict through the eyes of two kids growing up. What are your strongest memories from growing up--especially in the s..."Based on my memories, the best one yet is my adventure to over the summer of 2007.My sister andI went to a theme park called Michigan Adventures,allI have to write is it was a blast.


message 29: by Deandrea (new)

Deandrea Williams | 9 comments Mr. Seibert wrote: "The narrator-Scout-is a very strong personality. How would you describe her so far in the book? Why describe her in this way?"

In the book, as far as I have gotten,I think Scout is very outspoken and broad.She is also very intelligent because of her age being able to read and write.


message 30: by Havelyn (new)

Havelyn (MiaBooBaby) | 69 comments Mr. Seibert wrote: "Havelyn wrote: "Mr. Seibert wrote: "Havelyn wrote: "Mr. Seibert wrote: "The narrator-Scout-is a very strong personality. How would you describe her so far in the book? Why describe her in this way?..."

Scout is actually interesting to me now that I found out she is the narrator. She is very intelligent it seems and is a tom boy. She doesn't forgive easy though.


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