50 Books in 2011 for my friends around the world discussion

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Ryan's 50

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message 1: by Ryan (last edited Jan 08, 2011 03:30PM) (new)

Ryan | 8 comments Empire of Illusion The End of Literacy and the Triumph of Spectacle by Chris Hedges

Edit: That's a tiny picture! So here's the info:
Empire of Illusion: The End of Literacy and the Triumph of Spectacle by Chris Hedges

Rating 4/5

Super harsh critique of American culture. Many of his statistics are incredibly surprising and downright depressing. I think, after the first chapter, you could easily pick and choose the chapters you read. I liked them all except the one on happiness. I think it's an important read but one that will leave you feeling pretty crappy about the direction we are heading...


message 2: by Andy (new)

Andy | 10 comments Closing of the American Mind by Allan Bloom

Have you read "The Closing Of The American Mind" by Allan Bloom? Another good one if you want to continue feeling crappy about the future.


message 3: by Ryan (new)

Ryan | 8 comments Andy wrote: "Closing of the American Mind by Allan Bloom

Have you read "The Closing Of The American Mind" by Allan Bloom? Another good one if you want to continue feeling crappy about the future."


I have not. Thanks for the recommendation! I might need to read something more uplifting though until I pick this one up.


message 4: by Ryan (new)

Ryan | 8 comments Never a City So Real: A Walk in Chicago

Never a City So Real by Alex Kotlowitz
4.0/5

Kotlowitz really loves Chicago. This book is a collection of musings on the "real" Chicago (neighborhoods, public housing, Manny's deli...). Again, this is one that you could pick and choose chapters but I read it through and liked them all.


message 5: by Andrea (new)

Andrea | 3 comments Ryan, I think your reading list is the same trajectory of everything that interests me ever - American history, Chicago, politics, etc. I'm just going to copy your 50 this year. ;)


message 6: by Ryan (new)

Ryan | 8 comments ha! if you want to borrow anything, let me know.


message 7: by Ryan (new)

Ryan | 8 comments Battle Hymn of the Tiger Mother by Amy Chua

Battle Hymn of the Tiger Mother by Amy Chua

3.5/5

Okay, so with all the hype about this book I felt like I had to read it. I actually really enjoyed it. Even though she parents in a completely different way than I do I still learned a lot about myself through her journey as a "Chinese parent." I kinda wish she would've waited until her kids were older to write it though. It's hard to say how successful her techniques are considering her kids are in their teens right now.


message 8: by Ryan (new)

Ryan | 8 comments Laboring Women Reproduction and Gender in New World Slavery (Early American Studies) by Jennifer L. Morgan

Laboring Women by Jennifer Morgan

4/5

Warning: I'm in a women's history grad class so you are going to see a lot of books like this. Morgan's book attempts to put gender at the center of the racialization of slavery in the new world. Her ideas are groundbreaking and worth serious consideration. I'd recommend it for anyone who teaches slavery in any context.


message 9: by [deleted user] (new)

Would this book be interesting if you did not have a kid? From an anthropological or sociological perspective?


Ryan wrote: "Battle Hymn of the Tiger Mother by Amy Chua

Battle Hymn of the Tiger Mother by Amy Chua

3.5/5

Okay, so with all the hype about this book I felt like I had to read it. I actually really ..."



message 10: by Ryan (new)

Ryan | 8 comments Evan: Definitely! I think non-parents would simply reflect on being parented in the same way parents reflect on how they parent. Chua is funny and plays it up for the reader.


message 11: by Danielle (new)

Danielle | 58 comments I heard about this book recently also and was thinking of picking it up.


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