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Horrorpedia > Dark Fiction

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message 1: by Tressa (new)

Tressa  (moanalisa) | 19935 comments Define, give examples, discuss.


message 2: by Lee (new)

Lee | 2502 comments When your electricity goes out while your reading...that's dark fiction.


message 3: by Bryan (new)

Bryan Galstere (ThenewAmericanPsycho) | 219 comments lol good one


message 4: by Bryan (new)

Bryan Galstere (ThenewAmericanPsycho) | 219 comments kind of self-explanatory, anything that is morbid, violent, disturbing, dark is dark.


message 5: by Simon (new)

Simon (friedegg) I would imagine the kind of thing that "Dark Fiction" comprises of would be something like this month's group read book: "We Have Always Lived in the Castle" by Shirley Jackson. Not really horror as such but exploring dark themes that subtly hint at something more horrific than is explicitly laid out on the page.

I would be interesting in hearing other examples of this kind of thing...


message 6: by Bryan (new)

Bryan Galstere (ThenewAmericanPsycho) | 219 comments In my opinion, isn't dark fiction, basically GOTHIC? like Simon said, exploring dark/ominous themes, while it's not downright horror. I'm not a big fan of all these little sub genres all of the sudden.


message 7: by Tressa (new)

Tressa  (moanalisa) | 19935 comments Castle is a perfect example of dark fiction, IMO. When Darkness Loves Us is a great example of dark fiction.


message 8: by Tressa (new)

Tressa  (moanalisa) | 19935 comments "The Lottery" is very dark. I like Castle more than The Haunting of Hill House, too.


message 9: by Gatorman (new)

Gatorman | 8318 comments Alex wrote: "I actually love the term dark fiction. As a fan of gothic literature, I get tired of the broad scope of the term horror. We need to narrow the field a bit because I really don't want to read one mo..."

If you are into dark fiction, you may want to check out the "Dark Fiction" group on GR. I am a member and there are some interesting discussions regarding a variety of authors.


message 10: by Jason (new)

Jason (darkfiction) | 3233 comments I like the term dark fiction so much that if you see someone online with the handle darkfiction, it just might be me. LOL


message 11: by Tressa (new)

Tressa  (moanalisa) | 19935 comments When Darkness Loves Us by Elizabeth Engstrom is a great example of dark fiction. If anyone hasn't read this little novella, please do. It is fanfreakingtastic. I bought it for my Kindle last year and didn't know much about it. My jaw still hangs open in awe from how deliciously unique the story is at a time when so much in fiction is just microwaved plots.

I happened to be at a used bookstore the other day and I thought to myself, "Ya know, I own it on Kindle but I would still love to have a hard copy for my collection." As God is my witness I glanced down at the $2 bin and saw a hardback without the cover: When Darkness Loves Us was written on the spine. It was a beautiful sign from God, who wanted my ass to own this book in the worst way.


message 12: by Jason (new)

Jason (darkfiction) | 3233 comments That looks like a good one, Tressa! Thanks for the recommendation! :)


message 13: by Tressa (new)

Tressa  (moanalisa) | 19935 comments It is just amazing. Hope you like it Jason and Alex.


message 14: by Tressa (new)

Tressa  (moanalisa) | 19935 comments And I hope you like it, Alex. Hope I didn't build it up too much for you future readers. I think it's exquisite and, hey, that's all that matters.


message 15: by Craig (new)

Craig Hallam (craighallam) Alex wrote: "I actually love the term dark fiction. As a fan of gothic literature, I get tired of the broad scope of the term horror. We need to narrow the field a bit because I really don't want to read one mo..."

I think Alex has a point here. While there are a lot of sub-genres being created daily, it seems, there is a need to narrow the field of 'horror'. I prefer to read (and tend to write) dark speculative fiction, but I'm very rarely gory or SAW-esque. Give me psychological terror and tension any day. That's what Dark Fiction is to me.

I'l definitely be picking up 'When Darkness Loves Us'. It sounds like it'd be right up my dark, shadow-infested alley. Thanks for the heads up, Tressa.


message 16: by Tressa (new)

Tressa  (moanalisa) | 19935 comments You're welcome, Craig. I feel it's my duty to pimp out all the great stories I come across.


message 17: by Gatorman (new)

Gatorman | 8318 comments Tressa wrote: "And I hope you like it, Alex. Hope I didn't build it up too much for you future readers. I think it's exquisite and, hey, that's all that matters."

Hey, you built up The Summer I Died and that worked out well. I'll see if I can find it on my Nook.


message 18: by Tressa (new)

Tressa  (moanalisa) | 19935 comments And Pilo! I found it for my Kindle, so I hope you can find it for your Nook. It comes with a second novella that's also a great read.


message 19: by Gatorman (new)

Gatorman | 8318 comments Last time I looked Pilo was not available on the Nook but I will have to check again as it continues to update.


message 20: by Tressa (last edited Jun 15, 2011 09:11AM) (new)

Tressa  (moanalisa) | 19935 comments Oh, I meant that I found When Darkness Loves Us for my Kindle, not Pilo. Sorry for the confusion. But, looks like Pilo is available for the Kindle. Hope you find both of these books for your Nook. If you had a Kindle I could loan you my Darkness.


message 21: by Jason (new)

Jason (darkfiction) | 3233 comments *Off to the Kindle store to look for Pilo...*


message 22: by Tressa (new)

Tressa  (moanalisa) | 19935 comments About time, CJ! I think you're gonna love the wild ride you're gonna be in for. Enjoy, dear.


message 23: by Jason (new)

Jason (darkfiction) | 3233 comments The bastards only offer the kinkle version of Pilo to those living in the States. *grumble grumble*


message 24: by Tressa (new)

Tressa  (moanalisa) | 19935 comments You poor, discriminated Canadians. :-( There are these things called books that bind pages with words on them.


message 25: by Tressa (new)

Tressa  (moanalisa) | 19935 comments Ha, someone told me that it really doesn't always rain in Seattle. I didn't believe him.


message 26: by Anne (new)

Anne | 4 comments I think Stefan Bourque would fit into the category of dark fiction. His stuff is dark, more psychologically creepy, more about blurring the line between reality and possibility.


message 27: by Tressa (new)

Tressa  (moanalisa) | 19935 comments Even rain most days would put me in a deep funk. I don't get out into the sun much, but I like to know it's up there somewhere, beaming some rays down.


message 28: by [deleted user] (new)

I thought Dark Fiction was all this Twilight crap that's out at the moment haha...well pretty much horror denude of horror a bit like the "fantastique" literature from the 19th century.


message 29: by Jason (new)

Jason (darkfiction) | 3233 comments If Twilight were considered dark fiction, I'd put a bullet through my head. lol


message 30: by [deleted user] (new)

Jason wrote: "If Twilight were considered dark fiction, I'd put a bullet through my head. lol"

Yeah, that's me confusing Dark Fiction with Dark Fantasy there haha. Unlike with music, I tend to pay a little less notice to genre classification when it comes to books.


message 31: by Jason (new)

Jason (darkfiction) | 3233 comments LOL


message 32: by Philip (new)

Philip Athans (philathans) | 33 comments Not sure to what length I'm willing to go to defend this, but for discussion's sake:

Horror has some element of the supernatural to it.
Dark fantasy is horror set in a world other than our own.
Dark fiction is set in the here and now, with no supernatural element, but it's scary.

Um. Or...something like that?

I'm not sure what you call the SF/horror crossovers like the movie Alien.


message 33: by Phil (new)

Phil (philhappy) | 148 comments Philip wrote: "Not sure to what length I'm willing to go to defend this, but for discussion's sake:

Horror has some element of the supernatural to it.
Dark fantasy is horror set in a world other than our own.
Da..."


As a renowned hater of labels I’m only gonna jump in and ask, if “Horror has some element of the supernatural to it” then The Texas Chainsaw Massacre” is not a horror movie?

I’m not picking on you man, if I was, I’d go on a ten page rant about fantasy labels.

Rapidly approaching is the new “Urban Horror” label which I think may just be horror without the fantasy or romance and probably isn’t really that dark. Either way it will be set in an urban setting. But then again arguments often spring up over what the word ‘urban’ means. Many “people” think that urban only means a modern setting. But surely Victor Hugo’s The Hunchback of Notre Dame is an Urban Fantasy? NO! Why? No vampires or psychic detectives.

(ah shit I’m ranting)

What about werewolves? Ah fuck it I don’t know. They’re usually pack animals and therefore biker gangs. So we probably need a “Transient/urban/desert/hairy horror/fantasy/romance genre.

And then I ask someone, “Hey, wanna go see a horror movie called ‘Let the right one in’ and they say no, cos they don’t watch horror movies.

And a week later they say “Hey, wanna go see an urban fantasy romance movie called “Let the right one in”.

And I press the cold hard steel of the barrel up against the back of their neck and I claim my satisfaction; not from the severing of the brain from the spinal cord but from the warming of the steel…and the recoil.


message 34: by Phil (new)

Phil (philhappy) | 148 comments Jason wrote: "If Twilight were considered dark fiction, I'd put a bullet through my head. lol"

It's like, totally dark, dude, totaly.

Sorry I haven't seen/read it but the male friends I have just say that about it.

I'm totally dark dude. Totally.

I dunno, is it really like Bill and Ted fuck some vampires. I dunno. :S


message 35: by Jason (new)

Jason (darkfiction) | 3233 comments LOL

I think you might be totally crazy, Phil!


message 36: by Phil (new)

Phil (philhappy) | 148 comments Totally.


Dude.

Totally.

and dark too.


message 37: by Jason (new)

Jason (darkfiction) | 3233 comments LOL


message 38: by Stephanie (new)

Stephanie (stephthebookworm) Tressa, I just snagged a copy of it off Amazon for $4.00. Thanks for the recommendation!


message 39: by Tressa (new)

Tressa  (moanalisa) | 19935 comments Stephanie, hope you enjoy it!


message 40: by Jon Recluse (new)

Jon Recluse | 12043 comments Mod
I view Dark Fiction as another term for Quiet Horror.
I believe it was Charles L. Grant who originally coined the phrase as an alternative for authors and readers who shunned the Horror label.


message 41: by Alondra (new)

Alondra Miller | 1947 comments Tressa wrote: "Define, give examples, discuss."

What about The Road. quite dark, dystopian, and disturbing.


message 42: by Char (new)

Char  | 14689 comments Mod
I keep a stake handy in case I run into any sparkly vampires. : )

Any fans of dark fiction or gothic horror might like "The Yellow Wallpaper". It's free short story on Amazon for us Americans, I don't know about anyone else. It is a truly creepy read. I, too, prefer the creepy, eerie suspense type horror novel-not so much splatter, torture or any of that kind of thing.
What's funny is, I was reading it when the power went out! (We had a weird storm here in NE two weeks ago Saturday and our power was out for a week!).I was reading it by flashlight.


message 43: by Althea (new)

Althea Ann | 9 comments I'd like to second the recommendation. I also just enjoyed "The Black Wallpaper" by Kim Antieau, which is described here as an homage to that story.
http://www.smashwords.com/books/view/...


message 44: by Char (new)

Char  | 14689 comments Mod
I didn't know that Althea, thanks for the tip!!


message 45: by G.R. (new)

G.R. Yeates (gryeates) | 69 comments This Way for the Gas, Ladies and Gentlemen - fictionalised account of one man's experiences in Auschwitz. Controversial to this day because it compares life in the camp to life outside of it and finds there to be very little difference. Arbeit macht frei. One day we will all be free.


message 46: by Jason (new)

Jason (darkfiction) | 3233 comments G.R. wrote: "This Way for the Gas, Ladies and Gentlemen - fictionalised account of one man's experiences in Auschwitz. Controversial to this day because it compares life in the camp to life outsid..."

That does sound dark! lol


message 47: by Tressa (new)

Tressa  (moanalisa) | 19935 comments I used to own This Way for the Gas back in the '80s. Never read it though and finally got rid of it after getting burned out on depressing Holocaust material.

No, Jason. At least not for me. When Darkness Loves Us by Elizabeth Engstrom and The Beach by Alex Garland are perfect examples of dark fiction, IMO. When Darkness love us is fantastic. Read it.


message 48: by David (new)

David Rank (davejr) | 3 comments To me the simple definition for Dark Fiction is it is anti-happy ending stories. It explores mankind's less savory emotions and instincts. Dark metaphors tend to use fantasy elements to make the point, but it doesn't have to have a supernatural element to be considered Dark Fiction.


message 49: by M. Teresa (new)

M. Teresa Clayton (mteresaclayton) | 8 comments At 3:00 pm CST U.S. - will be offering JUDITH ebook/pdf free for fifteen minutes! Would appreciate a review if you choose to participate in the FlashSnatch.


http://www.lulu.com/spotlight/MTeresa...


have fun!


message 50: by M. Teresa (new)

M. Teresa Clayton (mteresaclayton) | 8 comments Judith is available for free download at Lulu.com - with my blessings - rated MATURE.


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