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Tales to Chill Your Blood Reads > The Ghoul by Sir Hugh Clifford Group Discussion (Spoilers)

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message 1: by Danielle The Book Huntress , Jamesian Enthusiast (new)

 Danielle The Book Huntress  (gatadelafuente) | 1347 comments Mod
Next up is "The Ghoul" by Sir Hugh Clifford.

Here is a link to the story:

http://www.horrormasters.com/Text/a40...


message 2: by Danielle The Book Huntress , Jamesian Enthusiast (new)

 Danielle The Book Huntress  (gatadelafuente) | 1347 comments Mod
I just finished reading this one. It was quite creepy, with some moments that made me laugh a little. I wonder where the author came up with this idea??


message 3: by J (new)

J (blkdoggy) Hmmm just read this one, found it......weird? I guess I missed something on this one. : O


message 4: by Danielle The Book Huntress , Jamesian Enthusiast (new)

 Danielle The Book Huntress  (gatadelafuente) | 1347 comments Mod
Jorge, what I got was that they encountered one of the creatures from the folklore of the region who preyed on dead babies. She reincarnates them to bite their tongues off. Don't ask me why! That I don't know. :)


message 5: by Martha (new)

Martha (hellocthulhu) | 325 comments Mod
I don't think I'd read this author before, but I wouldn't be opposed to reading more of him. The incredibly un-PC attitude of the narrator is to be expected at this time, but I still felt it was a bit over the top!

I love this kind of ghastly folklore, I find it endlessly fascinating. However, the most horrifying part to me was Juggins wanting to exhume and carry away the dead baby with him. Uggghhh.

You do have to wonder how the author came up with this idea. I hadn't heard of this particular piece of folklore before, but that doesn't mean much seeing as I'm not that familiar with eastern myths.


message 6: by Hazel (last edited Jan 11, 2011 12:16AM) (new)

Hazel Benson | 10 comments I love to learn about new myths and folklore and had to google some of the creatures mentioned in the story afterwards. The polong has a deferent story and purpose from the one mentioned in the story. There also seems to be some confusion over whether this creature is ghost or a vampire...or maybe it's the same thing in Malay.
Babies in horror stories always make me feel uncomfortable. Something that seems to have happened since having two of my own. The title suits it well though, it is pretty ghoulish. (And as Martha says un-pc)


message 7: by Danielle The Book Huntress , Jamesian Enthusiast (new)

 Danielle The Book Huntress  (gatadelafuente) | 1347 comments Mod
Martha, I didn't want to be the one always complaining about racism in classic horror, but I picked up on that too. I thought I'd shut up this time. Hazel, I love folklore, so that aspect of the story appealed to me. Like the narrator, I was horrified that his friend wanted to dig up and experiment on the dead baby. This story is quite ghastly, but in a way, I like the old school ghastly vibe. :)


message 8: by J (new)

J (blkdoggy) Lady Danielle "The Book Huntress" wrote: "Jorge, what I got was that they encountered one of the creatures from the folklore of the region who preyed on dead babies. She reincarnates them to bite their tongues off. Don't ask me why! That ..."


I guess I was expecting... something more. After reading so much horror one kind of gets immune. : )


message 9: by Danielle The Book Huntress , Jamesian Enthusiast (new)

 Danielle The Book Huntress  (gatadelafuente) | 1347 comments Mod
I totally respect that, Jorge. Selecting these classic stories is sort of like a crap shoot. You really don't know if you're going to get a good one, a bad one, or a mediocre one.


message 10: by Amanda (new)

Amanda M. Lyons (amandamlyons) Well at least we know the guys involved paid for their evil white guy mentality. It was very surreal overall and I liked the window into Malay culture. I got a feeling that this was based off of the Rudyard Kipling interest in that area of the world, granted in this case farther east.


message 11: by Danielle The Book Huntress , Jamesian Enthusiast (last edited Jan 11, 2011 08:21AM) (new)

 Danielle The Book Huntress  (gatadelafuente) | 1347 comments Mod
Amanda I think there was definitely an interest in the Orient. It's interesting, because it seemed to be teamed with a sense of racial superiority, but fascination with the exotic.


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