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Discussion - Canterbury Tales > Canterbury Tales - Resources

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message 1: by Everyman (new)

Everyman | 7718 comments Chaucer is a fertile field for scholarship, and there are many resources, both in books and on the Internet. If you mention a work or post a link here, please if possible include a sentence or two (or however many you want to) as to what you found interesting or useful about the resource.


message 2: by Everyman (new)

Everyman | 7718 comments I have found this a very useful site for the text of the Tales.
http://www.canterburytales.org/canter...

What I like about it is that in the "Edition" box you can choose either the original Middle English or Modern English. Or you can combine them on screen, either in parallel (Enface -- ME-MO has Middle English on the Left and Modern on the Right; MO-ME is the other way round) or interlined.

I really like the Enface ME-MO version; I can read the original on the left, but when I'm not sure of a meaning I just glance to the right and I have it in modern English. Best of both worlds!


message 3: by MadgeUK (last edited Jan 06, 2011 05:47AM) (new)

MadgeUK You can view the first and second editions of the original text, as printed by Caxton, on the British Library website:-

http://molcat1.bl.uk/treasures/caxton...

And there are some nice illustrations and audio readings here:-

http://www.luminarium.org/medlit/cant...


message 4: by Gayle (new)

Gayle Mangis | 163 comments For a quick read regarding Thomas a' Becket the archbishop of Canterbury, try T.S. Eliot's Murder in the Cathedral.


message 5: by MadgeUK (new)

MadgeUK Thanks Gayle, good idea.


message 6: by Galicius (new)

Galicius | 47 comments Everyman wrote: "I have found this a very useful site for the text of the Tales.
http://www.canterburytales.org/canter...

What I like about it is that in the "Edition" box you can choose either the ori..."



message 7: by Galicius (new)

Galicius | 47 comments Thanks Everyman for a great link. There is no substitute for the original word.


message 8: by Kerri (new)

Kerri I agree....the side-by-side is perfect.


message 9: by MadgeUK (new)

MadgeUK I purchased this cheapo Kindle edition of TCT, translated into Modern English by Nevill Coghill. It has copius notes and references and I am very pleased with it.

http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/B0...

I also purchased this one in Middle English but it has no notes:-

http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/B0...


message 10: by Everyman (new)

Everyman | 7718 comments MadgeUK wrote: "I purchased this cheapo Kindle edition of TCT, translated into Modern English by Nevill Coghill. It has copius notes and references and I am very pleased with it."

The Kindle books sold by Amazon uk aren't available to Us buyers. Sometimes the same editions are available here, sometimes not.


message 11: by Nemo (new)

Nemo (nemoslibrary) | 2456 comments I need to pick one from three translations, Burton Raffel, J.U.Nicolson and Nevill Coghill, but can't make up my mind. Audiobooks of all three editions are available at audible.com.


message 12: by Everyman (new)

Everyman | 7718 comments Nemo wrote: "I need to pick one from three translations, Burton Raffel, J.U.Nicolson and Nevill Coghill, but can't make up my mind. Audiobooks of all three editions are available at audible.com."

I got the Coghill recording both because it was the cheapest and because I have that translation in print so I could follow along if I wanted to. It's a fine recording; I'm enjoying it. The others may be equally fine or better; I can't say.


message 13: by Laurel (new)

Laurel Hicks (goodreadscomlaurele) | 2438 comments Everyman wrote: "MadgeUK wrote: "I purchased this cheapo Kindle edition of TCT, translated into Modern English by Nevill Coghill. It has copius notes and references and I am very pleased with it."

The Kindle books..."


This one is available in the U.S., and it is every bit as good as Madge says. Thank you, Madge. I got it!


message 14: by Laurel (new)

Laurel Hicks (goodreadscomlaurele) | 2438 comments Nemo wrote: "I need to pick one from three translations, Burton Raffel, J.U.Nicolson and Nevill Coghill, but can't make up my mind. Audiobooks of all three editions are available at audible.com."

The multi-narrator one of Nicholson's translation is excellent. I listened to all of "The Knight's Tale" today, in two sittings.


message 15: by Everyman (last edited Jan 14, 2011 04:42PM) (new)

Everyman | 7718 comments I have just discovered Mark Steele's Chaucer lecture on YouTube. I have only started it, but how can you resist a lecture in which one of the first sentences says that academics love Chaucer because they can be literary and dirty at the same time?

I don't know how good the rest of it will be, but I'm going right back to find out.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bBAOlk...

The lecture (in three parts ) is totally irreverent, but then, so was Chaucer. But be warned; it is a total spoiler for the Miller's Tale, and maybe for more tales (I've only started part 3, but wanted to get that warning out.) If you like British humor, you'll love this. What's amazing is that even with all the absurdity going on, as far as I can tell the facts about Chaucer are dead on, and there were a few that I wasn't aware of, such as the effect of the Black Death on Chaucer's ability to rise up out of the middle class.


message 16: by MadgeUK (last edited Jan 14, 2011 10:27PM) (new)

MadgeUK You are leading us astray again Everyman!!! :D

I appreciated the bit about God being counselled by a social worker re unleashing more floods upon humankind. Very applicable today as we witness devastating floods in both Australia and Brazil:(.

Also, the story about the protest against the poll tax law that 14 year old boys should be examined by catholic priests to see if they had pubic hair is pertinent:(. (Another 'king' did introduce a poll tax - Margaret Thatcher - and it contributed to her downfall too.)

I love his own little poem about Camilla!

BTW Mark Steel has an 'Estuary' dialect - a mix of Cockney and Essex. It is a fairly new dialect which arose postwar, after a large number of more affluent Londoners 'emigrated' from the city environs to rural Essex.

http://www.phon.ucl.ac.uk/home/estuar...


message 17: by [deleted user] (new)

Everyman wrote: "I have just discovered Mark Steele's Chaucer lecture on YouTube. I have only started it, but how can you resist a lecture in which one of the first sentences says that academics love Chaucer becau..."

Those videos were absurdly enjoyable. Thanks, Eman.


message 18: by Sasha (new)

Sasha Thanks Everyman, the video was v. funny, almost as funny as The Miller's Tale.


message 19: by Thomas (new)

Thomas | 4615 comments This site includes the text of the Tales with interlinear translation, materials on Middle English, (including audio files for help with pronunciation) and a whole bunch of supplementary information about Chaucer and the middle ages. Very spiffy.

http://www.courses.fas.harvard.edu/~c...


message 20: by Everyman (new)

Everyman | 7718 comments Thomas wrote: "This site includes the text of the Tales with interlinear translation, materials on Middle English, (including audio files for help with pronunciation) and a whole bunch of supplementary informatio..."

Great site, Thomas, for all the supplemental material. Though I prefer the side-by-side Middle/Modern versions to the interlined. But the supplementary stuff, the little I've been able to look at so far, looks great.


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