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Group Reads > Southern Cross Terry Coleman Part 4

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message 1: by Misfit (new)

Misfit | 478 comments Mod
I think it's spoilers ahoy at this point


message 2: by [deleted user] (new)

Ugh. I don't even really have anything to discuss about his book other than it kept putting me to sleep.

I think I should be banned from picking group reads from now on. Sheesh.


message 3: by Misfit (new)

Misfit | 478 comments Mod
Michele wrote: "Ugh. I don't even really have anything to discuss about his book other than it kept putting me to sleep.

I think I should be banned from picking group reads from now on. Sheesh."


Lol, please see my recent reading update.

ZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZ


message 4: by [deleted user] (new)

You know it's bad when I can't even bring myself to discuss how boring I think it is.....I'm in a coma.....help me.


message 5: by Carey (new)

Carey (thetometraveller) | 109 comments You are so funny, makes me feel a little better about sending you Vixen! I actually didn't think SC horrible....slow and not very exciting, yes. So what is up next that WILL be exiciting?


message 6: by Carey (new)

Carey (thetometraveller) | 109 comments By the way Michele, have caught your cold somehow from all the way cross the country...did you leave some germs lying around ORD? Now I need the nyquil!


message 7: by Jill (last edited Jan 05, 2011 10:12PM) (new)

Jill <>
Don't feel bad, Michele. I quite liked it. Wasn't great, but I think I would have liked it more if I'd known what type of book it was from the outset.



message 8: by Misfit (new)

Misfit | 478 comments Mod
Jill wrote: ">
Don't feel bad, Michele. I quite liked it. Wasn't great, but I think I would have liked it more if I'd known what type of book it was from the outset."


That's probably our biggest issue. It isn't the sweeping saga of grand passion we excepted going in.


message 9: by [deleted user] (last edited Jan 06, 2011 07:25AM) (new)

Misfit wrote:
That's probably our bigges..."


Yeah, it just fell way short of expectations. Way short.

@Jill - thanks, you're so sweet, but it really wasn't a good choice for a saga, despite the blurb on my cover comparing it to The Thorn Birds (*snort*).

@Carey - awww, geez, I'm sorry you're sick. And this is NOT a good book for sick people (unless it's from a doctor's POV....Dr. says sick peeps should sleep, ergo, Dr. would love this book. Ha.

Stay away from the Nyquil since that stuff is bad ju-ju. Sudafed worked best for me, anyway. And Dr gave cough syrup with codeine so I'd stop hacking long enough to fall asleep.

And Maisie Dobbs is a good sick book, fwiw! I'm leaving for Chicago here in a couple of hours for a 3 day trip and will be in Burlington, VT for long overnight tonite....what books should I bring? You're the sickie: it's your call!


message 10: by Misfit (new)

Misfit | 478 comments Mod
You know, with that every so misleading jacket cover, I'd love to see what Harriet would do with it :p


message 11: by [deleted user] (new)

the only ammy review was a 5 star review that only printed what was on the back jacket....no commentary at all. weird.


message 12: by Misfit (new)

Misfit | 478 comments Mod
Michele wrote: "the only ammy review was a 5 star review that only printed what was on the back jacket....no commentary at all. weird."

Well we will have that fixed lickety split. I see you've posted yours. Now for me to find something different to say...


message 13: by Jill (new)

Jill Misfit wrote: "Michele wrote: "the only ammy review was a 5 star review that only printed what was on the back jacket....no commentary at all. weird."

Well we will have that fixed lickety split. I see you've ..."


You could of course say that the cover blurb was misleading and false. Which it was.

Has anyone read the author's notes re Susannah King???


message 14: by Misfit (new)

Misfit | 478 comments Mod
Jill, not yet. I'm still at work. Hopefully I'll finish it off tonight.


message 15: by Jill (new)

Jill Misfit wrote: "Jill, not yet. I'm still at work. Hopefully I'll finish it off tonight."

Okay MIsfit. I look forward to your comments.


message 16: by Misfit (new)

Misfit | 478 comments Mod
Just finished and I am very much ready for a nap or early bed time. I agree with Michele about the lack of dialogue and telling instead of showing. Had a hard time understanding what was happening at the end with the riots with the gold miners. I know my eyes were glazing over, so that is partly my fault. Is there someway Jill or Marg can sum up these riots short and sweet?


message 17: by Jill (new)

Jill The Eureka rebellion, known as the Eureka Stockade (named after the stockade that was erected by the miners) occurred in December 1854 at Ballarat, Victoria. It was the culmination of years of simmering tensions between the gold miners and government officials.

The miners objected to the costs of mining supplies and the expensive miners'licence and their lack of representation to hear their claims.

The rebellion led by Peter Lalor was short, although resulting in some deaths on both sides, miners and soldiers. The outcome was that it led to greater freedom and rights for the miners. And some even view it as the birth of democracy in Australia.

It remains the only armed rebellion in out country's history. Australia has never known civil war.


message 18: by Misfit (new)

Misfit | 478 comments Mod
Thanks Jill.

The one thing in the end that I found most interesting was the final death nell for transportation - why pay to ship them over there, free them and let them get rich in the mines?


message 19: by [deleted user] (new)

I found the author's note fascinating in that he was originally encouraged to write a non-fiction history of Australia but felt that was beyond him so someone encouraged him to write it in a fiction format.

He should have stuck with non-fiction, IMO, since with the telling more than showing he has more of a knack for the non-fiction arena.


message 20: by Jill (last edited Jan 06, 2011 10:29PM) (new)

Jill Misfit wrote: "Thanks Jill.

The one thing in the end that I found most interesting was the final death nell for transportation - why pay to ship them over there, free them and let them get rich in the mines?"


Originally the intention was to transport convicts to a penal colony aka Australia. I'm pretty sure the first convicts in the decades after settlemment
(1770's thru to early 1800's)were simply prisoners and if they did their term they could then become free settlers. Of course not all ex-convicts became rich in the goldmines or as sheep graziers, etc.

The British simply had no choice but to transport convicts as the prisons in Britain were crowded. Transportation to the American colonies became no longer possible, hence Australia became the best place to house convicts.

By the 1830-40's transportation was unpopular and ceased officially.

Marg may be able to add to or expand on this very brief history of Australia.

P.S. I was really cheesed off to read in the author's notes that Susannah King wasn't even real!
Well he had me convinced she and Baudin were a couple.


message 21: by Misfit (new)

Misfit | 478 comments Mod
Michele wrote: "I found the author's note fascinating in that he was originally encouraged to write a non-fiction history of Australia but felt that was beyond him so someone encouraged him to write it in a fictio..."

From looking at his other books and his bio, NF was what he did. You are right, he should have stuck to it.


message 22: by Carey (new)

Carey (thetometraveller) | 109 comments Sorry to be MIA, long day travelling yesterday. I didn't think this one was so bad. Definitely not the Thorn Birds but I did learn a few things! I actually liked it better than the Outback books....


message 23: by Marg (new)

Marg (margreads) | 128 comments Jill wrote: "The Eureka rebellion, known as the Eureka Stockade (named after the stockade that was erected by the miners) occurred in December 1854 at Ballarat, Victoria. It was the culmination of years of simm..."

I was in Ballarat last weekend. It is a story that I don't think a lot of Australians know the full truth of. We know a kind of romanticised version about the battler versus authority - Australians do love an underdog.

While the battle was about the miner's fee, it was also about the danger of being on the goldfields with the lawlessness that was somewhat prevalent, and about the right to vote which most of the demographic we are talking wouldn't have had because of their lack of means.

If you want a good fictional read about the events, then I read Jackie French's YA novel The Night They Stormed Eureka was quite good, if you can get past the clunky time travel aspect.


message 24: by Marg (new)

Marg (margreads) | 128 comments Jill wrote: "Misfit wrote: "Thanks Jill.

The one thing in the end that I found most interesting was the final death nell for transportation - why pay to ship them over there, free them and let them get rich in..."


Yep, all the US's fault that we were a penal colony, because they stopped accepting prisoners ;-).

It's a bit surprising actually, but transportation didn't actually cease until the late 1860's. The main penal colonies were Queensland, New South Wales, and Tasmania, but a lot of the other colonies were actually free colonies, something I know used to be made quite a lot of in places like Adelaide. One oddity is that Perth was actually founded as a free colony in 1829, but then in the early 1850s transportation to there started due to the shortage of workers.

The most famous stories, and the most interesting from a fiction point of view I am sure, are of those who came out as convicts, who were freed, but then went onto make huge fortunes. That happened, but the vast majority would have been freed to live very normal, unexceptional lives.

As for getting rich in the gold mines, I am sure that the story was the same in California and Alaska. Yes a few people struck it lucky and made huge fortunes through their gold mining activities, but for most people it was a very difficult day to day existence which often provided the miners with less than enough to survive on.


message 25: by Misfit (new)

Misfit | 478 comments Mod
Thanks Marg and Jill. I think the part I found more fascinating than just transportation itself with the class distinctions between the emancipists and I completely forget what the other party was called.


message 26: by Marg (new)

Marg (margreads) | 128 comments The free settlers? That's not the name they used for themselves, but that's what they were?

It's interesting because for many years there was a kind of stigma associated with having a convict in the family history, but over the last probably twenty years that has started to change a lot


message 27: by Misfit (new)

Misfit | 478 comments Mod
Marg wrote: "The free settlers? That's not the name they used for themselves, but that's what they were?

It's interesting because for many years there was a kind of stigma associated with having a convict in t..."


Had to go to Wik, Exclusives is the word for those who were never *convicts*, but came of their own will.


message 28: by Misfit (new)

Misfit | 478 comments Mod
BTW, I picked up an interesting comment from "George" on my blog review. He thinks it's the greatest novel ever written :p

http://misfitandmom.wordpress.com/201...


message 29: by Jill (new)

Jill Misfit wrote: "BTW, I picked up an interesting comment from "George" on my blog review. He thinks it's the greatest novel ever written :p

http://misfitandmom.wordpress.com/201......"


Maybe George thinks it's the greatest, because it's the only one he's read. Can't think how else it could qualify as the greatest.

Wonderful review btw, Misfit. I liked SC a bit more than both you and Michele. But ultimately it was disappointing.


message 30: by Carey (new)

Carey (thetometraveller) | 109 comments Oh my, that is quite a statement from George! Made me laugh. He needs to broaden his reading horizons!


message 31: by Misfit (new)

Misfit | 478 comments Mod
I know. Even with the mixed opinions we have here, there is just no way that's the greatest book ever.


message 32: by Jill (new)

Jill Misfit wrote: "I know. Even with the mixed opinions we have here, there is just no way that's the greatest book ever."

Maybe 'George' is Terry Coleman?


message 33: by Misfit (new)

Misfit | 478 comments Mod
Jill wrote: "Misfit wrote: "I know. Even with the mixed opinions we have here, there is just no way that's the greatest book ever."

Maybe 'George' is Terry Coleman?"


You think?


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