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AMERICAN DEMOCRACY - GOVERNMENT > DIRECTORS OF CENTRAL INTELLIGENCE (CIA)

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message 1: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (last edited Jan 03, 2011 12:24PM) (new)

Bentley | 44207 comments Mod
**Spoiler Alert**

This is a thread to discuss the various heads/directors of the CIA.

The Office of United States Director of Central Intelligence (DCI) was the head of the United States Central Intelligence Agency, the principal intelligence advisor to the President and the National Security Council, and the coordinator of intelligence activities among and between the various United States intelligence agencies (collectively known as the Intelligence Community since 1981).

The office existed from January 1946 to April 2005 and was replaced by Director of National Intelligence (DNI) and Director of the Central Intelligence Agency (D/CIA).

List of Directors of Central Intelligence (in chronological order)

Director Tenure

RADM Sidney Souers, USN January 23, 1946 – June 10, 1946
LTG Hoyt Vandenberg, USA June 10, 1946 – May 1, 1947
RADM Roscoe H. Hillenkoetter, USN May 1, 1947 – October 7, 1950
GEN Walter Bedell Smith, USA October 7, 1950 – February 9, 1953
Allen W. Dulles February 26, 1953 – November 29, 1961
John McCone November 29, 1961 – April 28, 1965
VADM William Raborn, USN (Ret.) April 28, 1965 – June 30, 1966
Richard M. Helms June 30, 1966 – February 2, 1973
James R. Schlesinger February 2, 1973 – July 2, 1973
William E. Colby September 4, 1973 – January 30, 1976
George H. W. Bush January 30, 1976 – January 20, 1977
ADM Stansfield Turner, USN March 9, 1977 – January 20, 1981
William J. Casey January 28, 1981 – January 29, 1987
William H. Webster May 26, 1987 – August 31, 1991
Robert M. Gates November 6, 1991 – January 20, 1993
R. James Woolsey February 5, 1993 – January 10, 1995
John M. Deutch May 10, 1995 – December 15, 1996
George J. Tenet July 11, 1997 – July 11, 2004
Porter J. Goss September 24, 2004 – April 21, 2005

Position replaced by Director of the Central Intelligence Agency and Director of National Intelligence.

Director of the Central Intelligence Agency (D/CIA) serves as the head of the Central Intelligence Agency, which is part of the United States Intelligence Community. The Director reports to the Director of National Intelligence (DNI). The Director is assisted by the Deputy Director of the Central Intelligence Agency. The Director is a civilian or a general or flag officer of the armed forces[1] nominated by the President, with the concurring or nonconcurring recommendation from the Director of National Intelligence,[2] and must be confirmed by a majority vote of the Senate.[3] Statutes do not specifically set what rank an officer of the armed forces holds while in office, but trends leans to the officer appointed as a four-star general or admiral.

HISTORY

Before April 21, 2005, the Director of Central Intelligence (DCI) headed both the Intelligence Community and the Central Intelligence Agency. In addition, DCI served as an advisor to the President of the United States on intelligence matters and was the statutory intelligence advisor to the National Security Council (NSC). On April 21, 2005, the Director of National Intelligence (DNI) took on the roles as head of the Intelligence Community and principal intelligence advisor to the President and the NSC.

The post of DCI was established in 1946 by President Harry Truman; it thus predates the establishment of the Central Intelligence Agency (created by the National Security Act of 1947). After the end of World War II, the Office of Strategic Services was dismantled and its functions were split between the Departments of State and War (now Defense).

President Truman soon recognized the inefficiency of this arrangement and created the Central Intelligence Group, which could be considered a smaller precursor to the National Security Council.

The following year the National Security Act of 1947 created the Central Intelligence Agency and National Security Council, while formally defining the duties of the Director of Central Intelligence. The duties of the DCI had been further defined over the years by tradition, congressional acts, and Executive Orders.

List of directors

What follows is a list of Directors of the Central Intelligence Agency (in chronological order).

Position succeeded the Director of Central Intelligence

Porter J. Goss September 24, 2004 – May 26, 2006 Appointed by George W. Bush

Gen Michael Hayden, USAF (Ret.) May 30, 2006 – February 12, 2009 Served George W. Bush, Barack Obama

Leon Panetta February 12, 2009 – Present Appointed by Barack Obama

I have also provided a link to the Directors of National Intelligence:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Director...


message 2: by Alisa (new)

Alisa (mstaz) Casey: From the OSS to the CIA

Casey From the OSS to the CIA by Joseph E. Persico by Joseph E. Persico Joseph E. Persico

Synopsis
From Publishers Weekly
This biography of Casey (1913-1987), who served as SEC chairman, undersecretary of state for economic affairs and CIA director, includes a clarifying account of his role in the Iran-Contra affair. "Working from interviews and exclusive access to Casey's papers, Persico here writes a detailed, firmly three-dimensional biography covering each phase of a controversial life," said PW. Photos.


message 3: by Alisa (new)

Alisa (mstaz) Directors of Central Intelligence as Leaders of the U.S. Intelligence Community, 1946-2005
Directors of Central Intelligence as Leaders of the U.S. Intelligence Community, 1946-2005 by Douglas F. Garthoff by Douglas F. Garthoff

Synopsis
President Harry Truman created the job of director of central intelligence (DCI) in 1946 so that he and other senior administration officials could turn to one person for foreign intelligence briefings. The DCI was the head of the Central Intelligence Group until 1947, when he became the director of the newly created Central Intelligence Agency. This book profiles each DCI and explains how they performed in their community role, that of enhancing cooperation among the many parts of the nation’s intelligence community and reporting foreign intelligence to the president. The book also discusses the evolving expectations that U.S. presidents through George W. Bush placed on their foreign intelligence chiefs.

Although head of the CIA, the DCI was never a true national intelligence chief with control over the government’s many arms that collect and analyze foreign intelligence. This limitation conformed to President Truman’s wishes because he was wary of creating a powerful and all-knowing intelligence chief in a democratic society. After the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001, Congress and President Bush decided to alter the position of DCI by creating a new director of national intelligence position with more oversight and coordination of the government’s myriad programs. Thus this book ends with Porter Goss in 2005, the last DCI.

Douglas Garthoff’s book is a unique and important study of the nation’s top intelligence official over a roughly fifty-year period. His work provides the detailed historical framework that is essential for all future studies of how the U.S. intelligence community has been and will be managed.


message 4: by Jerome, Assisting Moderator - Upcoming Books and Releases (last edited Mar 28, 2013 06:25PM) (new)

Jerome | 4375 comments Mod
Here's one of the Agency's in-house histories:

General Walter Bedell Smith as Director of Central Intelligence, October 1950-February 1953

General Walter Bedell Smith as Director of Central Intelligence, October 1950-February 1953 by Ludwell Montague by Ludwell L. Montague

Synopsis

This book continues the official history of the CIA begun in Arthur Darling's The Central Intelligence Agency.Ludwell Lee Montague's book is one of the first documents, along with Darling's history, to be declassified and made available under the CIA's Historical Review Program, launched in 1985. Montague was a leading government official who participated in the interdepartmental debate over the postwar organization of U.S. intelligence that occurred in 1945. He drafted many of the policies of the Joint Chiefs of Staff during this bureaucratic struggle, including JIC 239/5, the plan that was also the basis for the establishment of the Central Intelligence Group, the predecessor of the CIA. He served as General Smith's executive assistant when Smith was appointed Director of Central Intelligence in 1950.Montague contends that Smith is so important to the development of the intelligence community that the history of the community can legitimately be thought of as "pre-Smith and post-Smith." The book focuses on the initiatives that Smith implemented in order to reform the U.S. intelligence community, which was under heavy criticism at the time for a series of intelligence failure. The reorganization of the intelligence community described her contains, with just a few exceptions, the predecessors of the major organizational components of today's CIA.This book serves as an important companion to Arthur Darling's book in that it provides both background material and Montague's opinion concerning how Darling's study came into existence. Most of this work survived the declassification process relatively intact to give us a detailed analysis of a critical period in the development of the intelligence community.


message 5: by Jerome, Assisting Moderator - Upcoming Books and Releases (new)

Jerome | 4375 comments Mod
And here's a more traditional biography:

Beetle: The Life of General Walter Bedell Smith

Beetle The Life of General Walter Bedell Smith by D.K.R. Crosswell byD.K.R. Crosswell

Synopsis

A valued adviser and trusted insider in the highest echelon of U.S. military and political leaders, General Walter Bedell Smith began his public service career of more than forty years at age sixteen, when he joined the Indiana National Guard. His bulldog tenacity earned him an opportunity to work with General George C. Marshall in 1941, playing an essential role in forming the offices of the Combined and Joint Chiefs of Staff; and after his appointment as chief of staff to Dwight D. Eisenhower in 1942, Smith took a central part in planning and orchestrating the major Allied operations of World War II in Europe. Among his many duties, Smith negotiated and signed the surrenders of the Italian and German armed forces on May 7, 1945.

Smith's postwar career included service as the U.S. ambassador to the Soviet Union, director of the Central Intelligence Agency, and undersecretary of state. Despite his contributions to twentieth-century American military and diplomatic history, the life and work of Smith have largely gone unappreciated. In Beetle: The Life of General Walter Bedell Smith, D. K. R. Crosswell offers the first full-length biography of the general, including insights into his close relationships with Marshall and Eisenhower.

Meticulously researched and long overdue, Beetle sheds new light on Eisenhower as supreme commander and the campaigns in North Africa, Italy, and Europe. Beetle is the fascinating history of a soldier, diplomat, and intelligence chief who played a central role in many decisions that altered mid-twentieth-century American history.


message 6: by Alisa (new)

Alisa (mstaz) Great addition, Jerome.


message 7: by Jerome, Assisting Moderator - Upcoming Books and Releases (new)

Jerome | 4375 comments Mod
Another:

Allen Dulles: Spymaster: The Life & Times Of The First Civilian Director Of The CIA

Allen Dulles Spymaster The Life & Times Of The First Civilian Director Of The Cia by Peter Grose by Peter Grose

Synopsis

Peter Grose's book is an authoritative account of one of the most intriguing figures in recent American history, Allen Dulles. Head of the CIA under Eisenhower and Kennedy, Dulles devoted his life to what he called "the craft of intelligence", changing the history of espionage. Peter Grose describes the man who was guided by his unwavering principles about the United States and its role in the world.


message 8: by Jerome, Assisting Moderator - Upcoming Books and Releases (new)

Jerome | 4375 comments Mod
The Man Who Kept the Secrets: Richard Helms & the CIA

The Man Who Kept the Secrets Richard Helms & the CIA by Thomas Powers byThomas Powers

Synopsis

Richard Helms is the quintessential CIA man. For 30 years--from the very inception of the Central Intelligence Agency & before--he occupied pivotal positions in that shadowy world: OSS operator, spymaster, planner, plotter, &, finally, for over 6 years, Agency director. No other was so closely & personally involved, over so long a period, with so many CIA activities, successful & otherwise. His story is the story of the CIA. In portraying Helms' extraordinary career, Pulitzer Prize-winning author Thomas Powers has in fact written the 1st comprehensive inside history of the CIA itself. It's a history, moreover, that is entirely uncensored. While the information on which it's based has been drawn from intensive interviews with dozens of former key Agency officials, including Helms himself, as well as from exhaustive research thru hundreds of published & unpublished sources, the author isn't subject to the kind of legal restraints that have burdened others writing about the CIA. The result is a picture of the Agency more objective, more complete & more revealing than any hitherto available. Because it's written with an eye for character & anecdote, it's as readable as it's important.


message 9: by Jerome, Assisting Moderator - Upcoming Books and Releases (new)

Jerome | 4375 comments Mod
Lost Crusader: The Secret Wars of CIA Director William Colby

Lost Crusader The Secret Wars of CIA Director William Colby by John Prados by John Prados

Synopsis

From his years as America's point man in Vietnam to his mysterious death in 1996, William E. Colby was one of the most enigmatic figures of the Cold War. Whether it was in CIA operations against Russia, anti-Communism in Western Europe, covert action in Southeast Asia, or its involvement in the Watergate affair, Colby stood at the center of the agency's secret activities.
Lost Crusader for the first time uncovers the real story of this master spy, from his beginnings in the OSS to his tumultuous years as Director of Central Intelligence in the 1970s. Reviled by many outside the CIA for his role in Vietnam, he was later cast as a scapegoat by the Nixon White House during the Church and Pike congressional investigations of CIA activities.
Based on extensive research and interviews with key participants, John Prados offers new revelations on the CIA in Western Europe and elsewhere: a fresh analysis of the notorious Phoenix program in Vietnam, and the most authoritative account of agency involvement in the bloody Indonesian coup of 1965 that overthrew Sukarno and brought General Suharto to power. Moreover, Prados has uncovered new evidence on the CIA's role in the 1963 assassination of President Ngo Dinh Diem of South Vietnam and also furnishes the first account of the action at the top level of the CIA during the final demise of South Vietnam in 1975.
A masterful study of a master spy, Lost Crusader offers vital insight into the Cold War, Vietnam, and the inner workings of the CIA.


message 10: by Jerome, Assisting Moderator - Upcoming Books and Releases (last edited Mar 28, 2013 06:38PM) (new)

Jerome | 4375 comments Mod
Shadow Warrior: William Egan Colby and the CIA

Shadow Warrior William Egan Colby and the CIA by Randall B. Woods by Randall B. Woods

Synopsis

World War II commando, Cold War spy, and CIA director under presidents Nixon and Ford, William Egan Colby played a critical role in some of the most pivotal events of the twentieth century. A quintessential member of the greatest generation, Colby embodied the moral and strategic ambiguities of the postwar world, and first confronted many of the dilemmas about power and secrecy that America still grapples with today.

In Shadow Warrior, eminent historian Randall B. Woods presents a riveting biography of Colby, revealing that this crusader for global democracy was also drawn to the darker side of American power. Aiming to help reverse the spread of totalitarianism in Europe and Asia, Colby joined the U.S. Army in 1941, just as America entered World War II. He served with distinction in France and Norway, and at the end of the war transitioned into America’s first peacetime intelligence agency: the CIA. Fresh from the fight against fascism, Colby zealously redirected his efforts against international communism. He insisted on the importance of fighting communism on the ground, doggedly applying guerilla tactics for counterinsurgency, sabotage, surveillance, and information-gathering on the new battlefields of the Cold War. Over time, these strategies became increasingly ruthless; as head of the CIA’s Far East Division, Colby oversaw an endless succession of assassination attempts, coups, secret wars in Laos and Cambodia, and the Phoenix Program, in which 20,000 civilian supporters of the Vietcong were killed. Colby ultimately came clean about many of the CIA’s illegal activities, making public a set of internal reports—known as the �family jewels”—that haunt the agency to this day. Ostracized from the intelligence community, he died under suspicious circumstances—a murky ending to a life lived in the shadows.

Drawing on multiple new sources, including interviews with members of Colby’s family, Woods has crafted a gripping biography of one of the most fascinating and controversial figures of the twentieth century.


message 11: by Jerome, Assisting Moderator - Upcoming Books and Releases (last edited Mar 28, 2013 06:40PM) (new)

Jerome | 4375 comments Mod
Burn Before Reading: Presidents, CIA Directors, and Secret Intelligence

Burn Before Reading Presidents, CIA Directors, and Secret Intelligence by Stansfield Turner by Stansfield Turner

Synopsis

In this "thoughtful, entertaining, and often insightful" book, a former CIA director explores the delicate give-and-take between the Oval Office and LangleyWith the disastrous intelligence failures of the last few years still fresh in Americans minds -- and to all appearances still continuing -- there has never been a more urgent need for a book like this.

In Burn Before Reading, Admiral Stansfield Turner, the CIA director under President Jimmy Carter, takes the reader inside the Beltway to examine the complicated, often strained relationships between presidents and their CIA chiefs. From FDR and "Wild Bill" Donovan to George W. Bush and George Tenet, twelve pairings are studied in these pages, and the results are eye-opening and provocative. Throughout, Turner offers a fascinating look into the machinery of intelligence gathering, revealing how personal and political issues often interfere with government busines -- and the nation's safety.


message 12: by Jerome, Assisting Moderator - Upcoming Books and Releases (last edited Jul 25, 2019 03:56AM) (new)

Jerome | 4375 comments Mod
A memoir:

At the Center of the Storm: My Years at the CIA

At the Center of the Storm My Years at the CIA by George Tenet by George Tenet George Tenet

Synopsis

In the whirlwind of accusations and recriminations that emerged in the wake of 9/11 and the Iraq war, one man's vital testimony has been conspicuously absent. Candid and gripping, "At the Center of the Storm" recounts George Tenet's time at the Central Intelligence Agency, a revealing look at the inner workings of the most important intelligence organization in the world during the most challenging times in recent history. With unparalleled access to both the highest echelons of government and raw intelligence from the field, Tenet illuminates the CIA's painstaking attempts to prepare the country against new and deadly threats, disentangles the interlocking events that led to 9/11, and offers explosive new information on the deliberations and strategies that culminated in the U.S. invasion of Iraq.

Beginning with his appointment as Director of Central Intelligence in 1997, Tenet unfolds the momentous events that led to 9/11 as he saw and experienced them: his declaration of war on al-Qa'ida; the CIA's covert operations inside Afghanistan; the worldwide operational plan to fight terrorists; his warnings of imminent attacks against American interests to White House officials in the summer of 2001; and the plan for a coordinated and devastating counterattack against al-Qa'ida laid down just six days after the attacks.

Tenet's compelling narrative then turns to the war in Iraq as he provides dramatic insight and background on the run-up to the invasion, including a firsthand account of the fallout from the inclusion of "sixteen words" in the president's 2003 State of the Union address, which claimed that Saddam Hussein had sought to purchase uranium from Africa; the true context of Tenet's own now-famous "slam dunk" comment regarding Saddam's WMD program; and the CIA's critical role in an administration predisposed to take the country to war. In doing so, he sets the record straight about CIA operations and shows readers that the truth is more complex than suggested in other versions of recent history offered thus far.

Through it all, Tenet paints an unflinching self-portrait of a man caught between the warring forces of the administration's decision-making process, the reams of frightening intelligence pouring in from around the world, and his own conscience. In "At the Center of the Storm," George Tenet draws on his unmatched experience within the opaque mirrors of intelligence and provides crucial information previously undisclosed to offer a moving, revelatory profile of both a man and a nation in times of crisis.


message 13: by Jerome, Assisting Moderator - Upcoming Books and Releases (last edited Jul 25, 2019 03:56AM) (new)

Jerome | 4375 comments Mod
Colby's memoir:

Honorable Men: My Life in the CIA

Honorable Men My Life In The CIA by William E. Colby by William E. Colby William E. Colby

Synopsis

Here is the inside story of American intelligence and espionage, told by one of the most controversial and visible of CIA directors.

Colby's career spanned thirty years, from the dramatic Second World War era of General "Wild Bill" Donovan -- when Colby was parachuted behind the enemy lines in German-occupied France and Norway, where he blew up railroads, joined resistance networks and led groups of underground fighters -- to the great public debate over the CIA's role and activities, in which Colby, as the embattled director, answered the questions of the press on a whole generation of CIA policies, secrets, operations and achievements. Colby describes, in full and accurate detail, the innermost workings and procedures of the CIA -- how it is organized; how it is managed and led; how its agents operate and hide; how intelligence is acquired, analyzed, checked and disseminated to the CIA's "customers."

Here is the real description of spycraft, by a man who knows it intimately, both from field experience (in wartime France and Norway and as a CIA operative in Scandinavia, Italy and South Vietnam) and as a senior official -- and the Director -- of the CIA in Langley.

His book is full of extraordinary behind-the-scenes dramas and decisions, and of intimate portraits of such world figures as Henry Kissinger, Lyndon B. Johnson (who gave Colby a surprising warning), the Diem brothers (with whom Colby had very close relations), Madame Nhu, Richard Nixon, President Thieu, Ambassador Claire Boothe Luce, Gerald Ford and the Kennedys, with unique appraisals of such formerly shadowy CIA figures as Allen Dulles (who once listened to Colby's report while in the bath), John McCone, Richard Helms, the fabled Desmond Fitzgerald, James Angleton, the legendary Edward Lansdale, and such old OSS "graduates" as Stewart Alsop.

He analyzes the creation and growth of "the three cultures" of intelligence, the separate divisions within the CIA, which were present at its creation, of the spymasters and counterspies, the political and paramilitary activitists and the analysts, and gives astonishing and detailed accounts of his own involvement in intelligence operations in Europe during the Cold War (particularly the CIA involvement in Italian politics); the Strategic Hamlet Program in Vietnam; the coup against the Diems; the CIA's international anti-Communist cultural, labor, student and journalist groups throughout the world; the "secret war" in Laos; the controversial Vietnam Pacification Program and CORDS (Civil Operations and Rural Development Supports), which Colby headed and which included the so-called Operation Phoenix; the CIA effort (ordered by Nixon) to block Allende in Chile; the CIA and Watergate; and Colby's own tenure as Director, which included the revelations about Glomar Explorer; the leak of the CIA's "family jewels" (the famous list of the Agency's illegal operations); sensational accusations of assassination and Angleton's departure...

Colby describes in fascinating detail his reorganization and streamlining of the Agency, his appearance before the Rockefeller Commission, his dealings with the Ford White House, his firing at the hands of President Ford in the "Halloween Massacre"...

This is an amazing, revealing book: a fascinating work of contemporary history and the autobiography of an extraordinary man.


message 14: by Jerome, Assisting Moderator - Upcoming Books and Releases (last edited Jul 25, 2019 03:55AM) (new)

Jerome | 4375 comments Mod
Helm's memoir:

A Look Over My Shoulder: A Life in the Central Intelligence Agency

A Look Over My Shoulder A Life in the Central Intelligence Agency by Richard Helms by Richard Helms Richard Helms

Synopsis

Here is the inside story of American intelligence and espionage, told by one of the most controversial and visible of CIA directors.

Colby's career spanned thirty years, from the dramatic Second World War era of General "Wild Bill" Donovan -- when Colby was parachuted behind the enemy lines in German-occupied France and Norway, where he blew up railroads, joined resistance networks and led groups of underground fighters -- to the great public debate over the CIA's role and activities, in which Colby, as the embattled director, answered the questions of the press on a whole generation of CIA policies, secrets, operations and achievements. Colby describes, in full and accurate detail, the innermost workings and procedures of the CIA -- how it is organized; how it is managed and led; how its agents operate and hide; how intelligence is acquired, analyzed, checked and disseminated to the CIA's "customers."

Here is the real description of spycraft, by a man who knows it intimately, both from field experience (in wartime France and Norway and as a CIA operative in Scandinavia, Italy and South Vietnam) and as a senior official -- and the Director -- of the CIA in Langley.

His book is full of extraordinary behind-the-scenes dramas and decisions, and of intimate portraits of such world figures as Henry Kissinger, Lyndon B. Johnson (who gave Colby a surprising warning), the Diem brothers (with whom Colby had very close relations), Madame Nhu, Richard Nixon, President Thieu, Ambassador Claire Boothe Luce, Gerald Ford and the Kennedys, with unique appraisals of such formerly shadowy CIA figures as Allen Dulles (who once listened to Colby's report while in the bath), John McCone, Richard Helms, the fabled Desmond Fitzgerald, James Angleton, the legendary Edward Lansdale, and such old OSS "graduates" as Stewart Alsop.

He analyzes the creation and growth of "the three cultures" of intelligence, the separate divisions within the CIA, which were present at its creation, of the spymasters and counterspies, the political and paramilitary activitists and the analysts, and gives astonishing and detailed accounts of his own involvement in intelligence operations in Europe during the Cold War (particularly the CIA involvement in Italian politics); the Strategic Hamlet Program in Vietnam; the coup against the Diems; the CIA's international anti-Communist cultural, labor, student and journalist groups throughout the world; the "secret war" in Laos; the controversial Vietnam Pacification Program and CORDS (Civil Operations and Rural Development Supports), which Colby headed and which included the so-called Operation Phoenix; the CIA effort (ordered by Nixon) to block Allende in Chile; the CIA and Watergate; and Colby's own tenure as Director, which included the revelations about Glomar Explorer; the leak of the CIA's "family jewels" (the famous list of the Agency's illegal operations); sensational accusations of assassination and Angleton's departure...

Colby describes in fascinating detail his reorganization and streamlining of the Agency, his appearance before the Rockefeller Commission, his dealings with the Ford White House, his firing at the hands of President Ford in the "Halloween Massacre"...

This is an amazing, revealing book: a fascinating work of contemporary history and the autobiography of an extraordinary man.


message 15: by Jill (new)

Jill Hutchinson (bucs1960) A controversial look at how the CIA evolved from the OSS.

Wild Bill and Intrepid: Donovan, Stephenson, and the Origin of CIA

Wild Bill and Intrepid Donovan, Stephenson, and the Origin of CIA by Thomas F. Troy by Thomas F. Troy (no photo)

Synopsis:

Was the CIA solely an American accomplishment--the work of "Wild Bill" Donovan--as CIA tradition has held? Or was it, in fact, established through the workings of Bill Stephenson, the legendary "Intrepid" who directed British intelligence in the U.S. during World War II? In this gripping book, a former staff officer and analyst at CIA unveils the truth about the agency's origins.


message 16: by Jill (new)

Jill Hutchinson (bucs1960) Dulles tells all.......or not.

The Craft of Intelligence: America's Legendary Spy Master on the Fundamentals of Intelligence Gathering for a Free World

The Craft of Intelligence America's Legendary Spy Master on the Fundamentals of Intelligence Gathering for a Free World by Allen W. Dulles by Allen W. Dulles (no photo)

Synopsis:

If the experts could point to any single book as a source for understanding twentieth-century intelligence, that book would be Allen W. Dulles's The Craft of Intelligence. This classic of spycraft is based on Dulles's incomparable experience as a diplomat, international lawyer, and America's premier intelligence officer. Dulles was a high-ranking officer of the CIA's predecessor - the Office of Strategic Services - and served eight years as director of the newly created CIA.
In The Craft of Intelligence, Dulles reveals how intelligence is collected and processed, and how the results contribute to the formation of national policy. He discusses methods of surveillance and the usefulness of defectors from hostile nations. His knowledge of Cold War Soviet espionage techniques is unrivaled, and he explains how the Soviet State Security Service recruited operatives and planted "illegals" in foreign countries. In an account enlivened with a wealth of personal anecdotes, Dulles also addresses the Bay of Pigs incident, denying that the 1961 invasion was based on a CIA estimate that a popular Cuban uprising would ensue. He spells out not only the techniques of modern espionage but also the philosophy and role of intelligence in a free society threatened by global conspiracies.This is a book for readers who seek wider understanding of the contribution of intelligence to our national security.


message 17: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)

Bentley | 44207 comments Mod
The Foundation of the CIA: Harry Truman, The Missouri Gang and the Origins of the Cold War

The Foundation of the CIA Harry Truman, The Missouri Gang, and the Origins of the Cold War by Richard E. Schroeder by Richard E. Schroeder (no photo)

Synopsis:

This highly accessible book provides new material and a fresh perspective on American National Intelligence practice, focusing on the first fifty years of the twentieth century, when the United States took on the responsibilities of a global superpower during the first years of the Cold War.

Late to the art of intelligence, the United States during World War II created a new model of combining intelligence collection and analytic functions into a single organization—the OSS.

At the end of the war, President Harry Truman and a small group of advisors developed a new, centralized agency directly subordinate to and responsible to the President, despite entrenched institutional resistance.

Instrumental to the creation of the CIA was a group known colloquially as the “Missouri Gang,” which included not only President Truman but equally determined fellow Missourians Clark Clifford, Sidney Souers, and Roscoe Hillenkoetter.


message 18: by Jerome, Assisting Moderator - Upcoming Books and Releases (last edited Apr 20, 2020 03:26PM) (new)

Jerome | 4375 comments Mod
An upcoming book:
Release date: September 15, 2020

The Spymasters: How the CIA's Directors Shape History and the Future

The Spymasters How the CIA's Directors Shape History and the Future by Chris Whipple by Chris Whipple (no photo)

Synopsis:

Only fourteen men and one woman are alive today who have made the life-and-death decisions that come with running the world’s most powerful and influential intelligence service. With unprecedented, deep access to all these individuals, Chris Whipple tells the story of an agency that answers to the United States president alone, but whose activities—spying, espionage, and covert action—take place on every continent.

Since its inception in 1947, the Central Intelligence Agency has been a powerful player on the world stage, operating largely in the shadows to protect American interests. For The Spymasters, Whipple conducted extensive, exclusive interviews with nearly every living CIA director, pulling back the curtain on the world’s elite spy agencies and showing how the CIA partners—or clashes—with counterparts in Britain, France, Germany, Israel, Jordan, Saudi Arabia, and Russia. He covers every topic from the influence of the White House on intelligence activity to simmering problems in the Middle East and Asia to rogue nuclear threats and cyberwarfare.

A revelatory look at the CIA’s impact across the globe, The Spymasters uncovers the inside stories behind the CIA’s seven decades of activity and elicits predictions about which issues—and threats—will occupy the espionage and surveillance landscape of the future. Including eye-opening interviews with George Tenet, John Brennan, Leon Panetta, and David Patraeus, as well as those who’ve just recently departed the Agency, this is a timely, essential, and important contribution to current events.


message 19: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)

Bentley | 44207 comments Mod
Thank you Jerome for the wonderful add.


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