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Gulliver's Travels: Travels into Several Remote Nations of the World.
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Old School Classics, Pre-1900 > Gulliver's Travels - A Voyage to Brobdingnag Spoilers

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Trisha | 492 comments Please post comments about the second voyage here!


Silver | 102 comments I find it quite ironic that while in Lillput he found himself to be a giant among little people and now he finds himself in a land of giants, and his first initial reaction is to presume that the people there must be more savage because of their size.

He does not seem to really connect the fact that he is now in the same position that the Lilliputan's were in when they discovered him.

There is something almost egocentric in his thinking because he does have first have prejudicial thoughts of the people of Brobdingnag even though he himself was once a giant. He lacks the ability to really empathize and see and consider the experiences of others. He thinks only in terms of himself.


Trisha | 492 comments I agree. He also comments on their physical appearances, that because they are so giant, all of their....physical flaws..are exagerated as if under a microscope He does a lot of description about the wife as she nurses the baby and how disgusted Gulliver felt. The author also seems to spend an awful lot of time talking about Gulliver's need to pee. What's up with that?? I guess he is trying to show the "everyday-ness" even though gulliver is in a foreign land.


Silver | 102 comments Trisha wrote: "I agree. He also comments on their physical appearances, that because they are so giant, all of their....physical flaws..are exagerated as if under a microscope He does a lot of description about..."

LOL I did love his description of how repulsive the breast was when seen so large and up close.

Yes, he does explain it as his way of trying to give the reader the domestic accounts of his journey and adventures.

The other think which strikes me as strange, is in this part he spends a lot of time talking about how he missed his wife and his children, but in the first part he never mentioned them once and I had no idea he was even married.


Silver | 102 comments I am not quite sure what to make of all the scenes of nakedness and removing of clothes before the Maids of Honor. In spite of Gulliver's statements of being disgusted by these actions there does seem to be some sexual suggestion offered here.

Perhaps it is an allusion to the fact that "ladies" are not so chaste and virtuous as they are perceived to be or as they would have others believe them to be. Maybe it is meant to make fun of what women do when they are all together behind closed doors so to speak.


Silver | 102 comments I really like the clever way in which Swift indirectly criticizes England, and its government. While Gulliver, the representative of his homeland, speaks with pride and praise of his homeland, through the comments of the King of Brobdingnag we can see the way in which England may be perceived through the eyes of others.

Thus the flaws of its government and civilization are pointed out from the non-biased perceptions of one who is completely ignorant of the country.


Trisha | 492 comments I did enjoy this section, and i do agree that there seemed to be a lot more nudity than in his last travel. I also noticed that, while in Liliput, he was regarded as a potential threat, but in this land he was more of a pet. He also seemed to have a lot of trouble with the local wildlife (i.e. rats, flies, wasps, and a monkey). The monkey was a little gross! Actually, now that i think about it, there was a lot more description that made me think "eeewww...nasty..." in this section. Like, for example, turning the corn into a drinking glass! hahaha!


Silver | 102 comments Trisha wrote: "I did enjoy this section, and i do agree that there seemed to be a lot more nudity than in his last travel. I also noticed that, while in Liliput, he was regarded as a potential threat, but in thi..."

It was amusing reading about all his various different misadventures within this land. I really liked the part where he was talking about how he fell into a gopher hole and tripped over a snail shell. It is hard to try and get a perspective in my head of just how much bigger everything here is in proportion to him.

Like when he gets attracted by that bird a linnet I think it was called, and he said it was about the size of a swan, because the birds are actually sparrow like.


Tammy | 3 comments I think his indirect criticism of England and the politics of them time was very well done. I really liked how it was written with Gulliver trying his best be boastful of the country, but the King just kept asking questions and just could not understand that type of governing.

Another thing that caught my attention from this section of the book was the gun powder incident. Gulliver thought he would be doing the King a great service by teaching him and his people how to make gun powder. But the King was horrified by the things that Gulliver told him it could do. The King called him an "impotent and groveling insect" and wondered how he could "entertain such inhuman ideas". The King said that "some evil genius, enemy to mankind, must have first contrived it". Gulliver also stated the King would rather lose half his kingdom that be privy to such a secret.

My favorite of his misadventures was his landing right in the middle of a cow pie. I found that to be quite humorous, probably because I myself had similar missteps as a child. It happens. :)


Trisha | 492 comments I loved the part with the gun powder! Here, Gulliver was so proud of the military and thought that he was sharing a great thing with the king by enabling him to completely dominate other countries, when in fact the king wanted nothing to do with it.

Gulliver does seem to spend an awful lot of time speaking "proudly" of England, but it always comes out negative. Hmmmm....


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