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Gulliver's Travels: Travels into Several Remote Nations of the World.
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Old School Classics, Pre-1900 > Gulliver's Travels - A Voyage to Lilliput Spoilers

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Trisha | 492 comments Please post comments for the first voyage here!


Trisha | 492 comments I am a good ways through the first voyage and I am really enjoying it! I especially liked when the Lilliputians were searching his pockets and describing the different every-day objects, like when they referred to his pocket watch as an oracle because he consulted it throughout the day, haha!. I am also surprised, and amused, by how calm and matter of fact Gulliver is about having woken up and being taken prisoner on an island of miniature people! Swift even takes a humorus moment to discuss Gulliver having to "relieve" himself and describing what a waterfall that must have been for the people. I can't wait to see what happens next!

For some reason, I can only remember the Lilliputians, and I can't seem to recall any of his other travels, soI am curious to see where else he ends up!


message 3: by Silver (last edited Jan 03, 2011 08:03PM) (new) - rated it 4 stars

Silver | 102 comments I am nearly finished with the Lilliputian's and I nearly cracked up in the incident of how he puts out the fire at the palace, and what that led up to. I can only imagine.

I also really enjoy Swifts political satire within this story. My edition of the book has some rather interesting footnotes explaining the political references within the book.

I also really enjoyed the discussion about there education system, and the way in which girls and boys he discerned were educated in much of the same way. I particularly enjoyed the remark made about it being better to have a sensible wife because they will not stay young forever.


Trisha | 492 comments I LOVED how he put out the fire, I think that I actually laughed out loud! The ending of this part was interesting, and a little sad, after everything that he had done to help them! I guess that is politics for you. I think the one fellow stated that treason starts in the heart before overt actions are seen, so better to kill the man-mountain now rather than to wait. That sort of thinking is a little twisted (though it is funny that they refer to him as man-mountain even in the legal documents).


Silver | 102 comments It is unfortunate that his friendship with the Emperor had come to that, though I did find the whole problem of the inconvenience his dead body would cause them to be quite amusing, as well as their discussion on the idea of putting out his eyes as a solution to their problem with him.

I loved the fact that the Emperor thought that he would be perfectly willing to comply with having his eyes put out.


Trisha | 492 comments I know! They thought that he would just lay down on the ground while they shot poison arrows into his eyes! Haha! No big deal, right? I think that they were also going to slowly starve him to death, as if he might not notice.


Silver | 102 comments Haha yes, or try to poision his shirts.


message 8: by Emily (new)

Emily (The Litertarian) (emmaleighbug) I haven't quite finished this section yet, but I wanted to say how much i'm enjoying it so far. I admit I probably don't understand some of it, but I love some of the words he uses, that was commonplace back then. 'The sun offended my eyes' was my favorite. I love that it conveys perfectly it's meaning, yet you would never hear anyone say it today.


Trisha | 492 comments I am really amused by his narration as well, it makes the story very entertaining.


Tammy | 3 comments I just finished reading about the voyage to Lilliput. The thing that stuck out the most to me about this part of the book was the reasoning behind the war. 11,000 have died in a war based on whether you break your egg on the small end or the big end. It seems completely absurd to think that a war could be brought about by such reasoning, but that was obviously his point.

It is so far a very interesting book. I like that the edition I am reading has the footnotes for the political references - even if I really have no idea what most of them mean.


Silver | 102 comments The war was represent of the conflict between Catholicism and the Protestantism . By using the scenario of going to war over how one breaks their egg, I believe is Swift's way of pointing out the absurdity of war, and particularly over people who both believe in the same god fighting with each other simply because the way they choose to worship that god is different.

It does not matter which way to break the egg, if the result is still the same, equating with, it should not matter what method you choose to worship God because you are still achieving the same purpose.


message 12: by Emily (new)

Emily (The Litertarian) (emmaleighbug) I finally finished this section, and I liked it, though I know there are some parts I didn't understand but just kept going anyway. Only reading on breaks at work is maybe not the best time to absorb this stuff!

One thing I thought was interesting is how huge the colonies of people were. Didn't he make a comment about how many there were? Also, it was remarkable to me that they had enough food and cloth to feed and clothe him for his stay. He ate an entire walmart full of groceries every day! And they had enough material to make him a bed? That was the part that seemed the most far fetched to me.


Trisha | 492 comments Silver wrote: "The war was represent of the conflict between Catholicism and the Protestantism . By using the scenario of going to war over how one breaks their egg, I believe is Swift's way of pointing out the a..."

Ooohh, that's deep Silver! I just thought it was silly that they were fighting over eggs! Ha!


Trisha | 492 comments Emma wrote: "I finally finished this section, and I liked it, though I know there are some parts I didn't understand but just kept going anyway. Only reading on breaks at work is maybe not the best time to abso..."

Hahaha! You found them having enough food to feed him as being farfetched, but the fact that he was on an island of miniature people was completely believable? :-) I am glad that everyone is enjoying it! There are definitely parts that I don't understand as well, but I think that is a problem that everyone is having with the story.


message 15: by Emily (new)

Emily (The Litertarian) (emmaleighbug) Yeah, once I read your analysis, Silver, I feel like I need to read sparknotes as a companion!!


message 16: by Katy, New School Classics (new) - added it

Katy (kathy_h) | 9708 comments Mod
Anyone on the re-read done with this section yet? Any new thoughts here? It was funny as how calm Gulliver was when he woke up and tied down with the miniature ropes. I liked the description of how much the Lilliputians had to feed him. I'm afraid I would have panicked and totally ripped up the ropes and trampled a few Lilliputians.


message 17: by Terri (new) - added it

Terri (terrilovescrows) | 39 comments I can handle the miniature people aspect, feeding him, being able to build things for him... that is really hard to fathom. But its okay to suspend reality a bit for a good story.


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