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Jane's Books > Minor Works

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message 1: by Heather (new)

Heather (pheather) Post here general discussions on The Watsons, Lady Susan and Sanditon.


message 2: by [deleted user] (new)

Has anyone read, or even heard of, Love and Freindship? This one surprised me!


Captain Sir Roddy, R.N. (Ret.) (captain_sir_roddy) Jeannette wrote: "Has anyone read, or even heard of, Love and Freindship? This one surprised me!"

I've not read it, but I've read a lot about it in articles in JASNA's online journal. I think, included in her juvenilia, is her 'history' of England too. It is my understanding that she loved to write little stories as a child and then read them to her family. My fondest wish is that Ms. Austen could have survived to a ripe old age, writing her wonderful fiction the entire time. Cheers! Chris


message 4: by [deleted user] (new)

Thanks, Chris! I second that wish.


message 5: by Margaret (new)

Margaret Metz | 112 comments Jeannette wrote: "Thanks, Chris! I second that wish."

Me too. :o)


message 6: by Kim (new)

Kim | 181 comments I recently got a Nook (Barnes and Noble's e-reader) and they had a great deal on all of Jane Austen's novels in one for 99 cents. I bought it knowing that I re-read her novels all the time and Love and Friendship was part of the package as well as Lady Susan! I'd love to hear other's opinions of them, and I'll make sure I post when I finish them as well!


Captain Sir Roddy, R.N. (Ret.) (captain_sir_roddy) Kim wrote: "I recently got a Nook (Barnes and Noble's e-reader) and they had a great deal on all of Jane Austen's novels in one for 99 cents. I bought it knowing that I re-read her novels all the time and Lov..."

Ohh, Lady Susan is a viciously clever novella! Clearly, one of Austen's most dastardly villains. It is written in the epistolary style too, which makes for a different reading experience. Have fun with Lady Susan, Kim! Cheers! Chris


message 8: by Shaun (new)

Shaun | 123 comments I found Love and Friendship under the free domain books for the Kindle, so I got it for free. I'm having a hard time finding Lady Susan and Sandition in store. I'll continue to hunt!


message 9: by Badlydone (new)

Badlydone Lady Susan and Love and Freindship are both epistolary novels - I loved them. I am working on Sanditon now. I have Lady Susan/Watsons/Sanditon all in one book which is very convenient.


message 10: by Shaun (new)

Shaun | 123 comments I saw that on amazon! I may have to go that route, since I see a lot of Lady Susan with another book that I already own (the version I had was with Emma).


message 11: by J. (new)

J. Rubino (jrubino) | 215 comments At last year's JASNA conference, Elizabeth Garvie, who played Elizabeth in the 1980 Pride and Prejudice was guest of honor. She gave a reading of an excerpt from "The Three Sisters", and had the audience howling with laughter. I had read it years ago, but there is something to be said for hearing it - an endorsement for audiobooks.

Lady Vernon and Her Daughter, a novel of Jane Austen's "Lady Susan
janetility.com


message 12: by Rachel, The Honorable Miss Moderator (new)

Rachel (randhrshipper1) | 674 comments Mod
I read Love and Freindship in my Jane Austen class in college and LOVED it! It is so funny! XD I have also read all of her unfinished fragments ( Sandition, The Watsons, and Lady Susan)-- but it has been awhile and I would love to read them again. Perhaps our next group read?


message 13: by [deleted user] (new)

Rachel wrote: "I read Love and Freindship in my Jane Austen class in college and LOVED it! It is so funny! XD I have also read all of her unfinished fragments ( Sandition, The Watsons, and Lady Susan)-- but it ha..."

Sarah and I were just discussing the same thing today! :) We'll be posting about it soon.


message 14: by Mary (new)

Mary Catelli | 50 comments Love and Freindship was wonderful. Perfect of its kind and nicely foreshadowing Northanger Abbey.

Though when reading her juvenilia, what I noticed that while "Catherine, or The Bower" is incomplete and probably uncompletable - she had boxed herself into a situation where she would needed a deus ex machina to solve the problems posed -- it still showed the great maturity that would mark the novels.


message 15: by Abigail (new)

Abigail Bok (regency_reader) | 503 comments I would love to read one or more of the minor works in a group read. Isn't the Lady Susan movie coming out next summer or roundabout? (The one called, bizarrely enough, Love and Friendship and directed by Whit Stillman.) Maybe a read in conjunction with that?


message 16: by Fanny (new)

Fanny Mills | 6 comments Yes, the movie is supposed to be out very soon, if not already out. Still haven't figured out why Whit Stillman made a film version of "Lady Susan" with the title "Love & Friendship," since they are two totally different stories! (I feel like a similar thing happened with the title/plot of at least one James Bond film).

I happen to really love "Lady Susan," as well as Jane's earlier works. We all read Jane for different reasons, and I definitely love the romantic parts (Lizzy & Darcy, Anne & Captain Wentworth ... sigh...) but I also really love her villains, and "Lady Susan" is an exquisite one.

In her early works, Jane is also much wilder. The wit is definitely there, but it is much less restrained, for better and for worse. She has always been more of a 18th century writer than a 19th century writer, and that is even more evident in the spirit of her earlier works.


message 17: by Mary (new)

Mary Catelli | 50 comments Oh, yes. Wit is the pith and essence of her juvenilia. Until you hit "Catherine, or The Bower" -- which I don't think is salvageable, since she set up problems that couldn't be fixed in the course of the plot -- but which shows definite expanding of her skills past the "Love and Freindship" satire.


message 18: by Fanny (new)

Fanny Mills | 6 comments I'll have to go re-read that one and get back to you- it's been a while since I last read "Catherine."


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