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Authors > Laird Barron

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message 1: by Charles (new)

Charles (tonalized) | 16 comments I just started The Imago Sequence and Other Stories, and I have to say I'm pretty impressed. Any other fans out there?


 Danielle The Book Huntress  (gatadelafuente) | 217 comments I have that and Occultation. I am excited to finally read him. I've heard great things about him.


message 3: by Simon (new)

Simon (friedegg) I've got this one lined up to read shortly. I will report back...


message 4: by Cathy (new)

Cathy | 177 comments Which collection should I start with, Imago or Occultation?


message 5: by Simon (new)

Simon (friedegg) I thought "The Imago Sequence" was a fine collection of short stories. I plan to read "Occultation" as soon as I can.

Cathy, I know it's a bit late to answer your question but I doubt that it matters which collection you read first.


message 6: by Robert (new)

Robert Kratky (bolorkay) | 334 comments I've read of some similarities between Laird Barron and Lovecraft. As someone who is not really a Lovecraft "fan" will this be a stumbling block in my effort to appreciate and enjoy Mr. Barron?
To be honest, some of my favorite authors, over the decades have been King, Matheson, Charles L. Grant, Bloch, Bradbury etc.


message 7: by Ian (new)

Ian Rogers (onemoreshadow) Barron is one of the greats. His collections are excellent, and so is his novel, The Croning. I highly recommend it.


message 8: by Simon (new)

Simon (friedegg) I will just echo what others have said in that Barron definitely has his own voice and style, he's far more than a mere Lovecraft imitator.

I think anyone that writes in the cosmic horror vein gets labelled as the next Lovecraft, just as every horror thriller writer gets compared to King.

Barron's horror is weird, ambiguous and thought provoking. It may take more than one reading to make sense of what happened, he doesn't spell everything out for the reader, nor lead them by the hand towards particular conclusions. You will need to actively engage with his work, fill in some of the gaps yourself, the horror generally lying in what is implied rather than is made explicit.


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