The Old Man and the Sea The Old Man and the Sea discussion


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Santiago

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message 1: by [deleted user] (new)

What`s ur idea about Santiago? Is he a sign of Chirst?


Luis Mmmm...good question. I'll have to think about that!


message 3: by Kev (new) - rated it 5 stars

Kev D'Olivo There is no doubt that Santiago is a figure of christ.


Luis No doubt? Really? I'm going to have to re-read this because, while I remember the obvious references to Christ I'm not sure how the character could be a sign of Christ. Can you tell me a little more about your thoughts because I am interested.

Thanks!


Sarah Santiago is ignored or demeaned by his community as Christ was.
In the final pages, he stumbles while carrying she skiff's mast on his shoulders-- a direct reference to Jesus carrying the cross.


Henry At times he did seem like a martyr. Stating that either himself or the fish would not come alive from the ordeal. I really didnt see any other christ-like connections, considering he survived at the end of the novel. I feel that that is where any sort of biblical reference ends for me. I enjoyed it as a straight-forward story of a man measuring his pride with his ability and opportunity to perform his trade. Maybe I'm just as simple as Santiago, but that's how I feel about it.


message 7: by Phillip (last edited Oct 09, 2011 12:42PM) (new) - rated it 5 stars

Phillip Casteel Hemingway was using the language and imagery, as many writers do, but I don't see Santiago as a sign of Christ. Certainly the 40 day dry spell was linked to time in the desert. Christ's temptation. But that doesn't make Santiago Christ-like or a sign. There is no doubt Hemingway is making the analogy of Christ-like scarring and suffering. However, Santiago in spanish means St James (the apostle fisherman).
Santiago doesn't die for anything. He only fights the human battle against death. On the other hand the fish dies for Santiago. In death Santiago and the fish are joined. It is the fish that it mounted to the wood and then has its side pierced (sharks).
An argument could be made for the fish or Santiago to be a sign of Christ. But I would argue neither are a sign of Christ (since neither provide the communal sacrifice we see in literature that utilizes the Christ trope). Both are simply revealed through language and imagery associated with the Christ.


BubblesTheMonkey I read it freshman year of high school. Our teacher pointed out several signs (some of which I may have forgotten). One was when he was returning home, carrying the mast (plus he was extremely beaten up). That would symbolize Christ walking with the cross.


Nancy Lewis Perhaps Santiago is more of an every-man, who suffers just as Christ suffered, but does not die as Christ did because he's not Christ. We all have our own crosses to bear.


message 10: by Nick (new) - rated it 5 stars

Nick Desantis You would think that after the fish was half eaten by the sharks he would have pulled up the other half and put it into the boat. So, is Hemingway saying we must all suffer in order to be Christ-like?


María Fersay Nancy wrote: "Perhaps Santiago is more of an every-man, who suffers just as Christ suffered, but does not die as Christ did because he's not Christ. We all have our own crosses to bear."

I agree with this 100%


Debarati Nancy wrote: "Perhaps Santiago is more of an every-man, who suffers just as Christ suffered, but does not die as Christ did because he's not Christ. We all have our own crosses to bear."

Well said.


Debarati Santiago is a hero in his own rights. His determination, fight against all odds (old age, lonliness, poverty, harsh weather conditions...) makes him a hero. He considers the magnificent fish as his brother, yet he catches it because that is what he is meant to do as a fisherman. He believes in the cycle of life and the purpose behind life's many mysteries and creations.


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