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Books about Pennsylvania

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message 1: by Arminius (new)

Arminius | 46 comments The Kingdom of Coal is a fantastic book about the history of Pennylvania's Anthracite Coal Region.

It received 5 out of 5 on each review on Amazon.
http://www.amazon.com/Kingdom-Coal-En...


message 2: by Wendy (new)

Wendy | 181 comments Thanks for sharing! I will have to check it out.


message 3: by Arminius (new)

Arminius | 46 comments Making Sense of the Molly Maguires by Kevin Kenny is another great book about Pennsylvania history.


message 4: by Arminius (new)

Arminius | 46 comments One of the best novels of the 20th Century.

Appointment in Samarra
by John O'Hara

http://www.time.com/time/specials/pac...


message 5: by Darlene (new)

Darlene | 6 comments A really good book I read about my 'neck of the woods' is Legends and Lore of Western Pennsylvania by Thomas White.... lots of folklore and urban legends in it. Very interesting and full of humor.


message 6: by Wendy (last edited Apr 06, 2011 12:16PM) (new)

Wendy | 181 comments Arminius wrote: "One of the best novels of the 20th Century.

Appointment in Samarra
by John O'Hara

http://www.time.com/time/specials/pac..."


I was curious Arminius have you actually read the book? Or were you saying it was one of the best novels because it was listed on Time's All Time 100 novels?


message 7: by Arminius (new)

Arminius | 46 comments I read it Wendy. I am saying it was one of the best however because I know many lists that say so. My opinion is that is good but I am way more familiar with nonfiction books to give an accurate opinion of my own.


message 8: by Wendy (new)

Wendy | 181 comments I will have to put it on my list to read then.


message 9: by Darlene (new)

Darlene | 6 comments I recently read 3 books about Pennsylvania.... Ghost Stories of Berks County by Charles Adams III; The Johnstown Flood by David McCullough and Pennsylvania Battlefields and Military Landmarks by Arthur P. Miller Jr. All 3 books were very interesting. I especially liked the McCullough. Of course, I'm a huge fan of his anyway.


message 10: by Wendy (new)

Wendy | 181 comments I read the Ghost Stories of Berks County and Maybe the the Pennsylvania Battlefields and Landmarks, I still haven't gotten around to reading The Johnstown Flood.


message 11: by Eden (new)

Eden (tsalagi_writer) | 12 comments Right now I'm reading Night Stalks the Mansion: A True Story of One Family's Ghostly Adventure. It's a true story about a haunted mansion in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. It's good, so far.


message 12: by Dianne (new)

Dianne (diannecc) | 8 comments I read this just last year! It was near where I grew up in Media, Pa. My school bus use to go by it and it had gotten really run down. It has since burnt down, over 25 yrs ago and someone did build a new gorgeous home there. My brother's friend went in there in the early 80s and took photos. I don't remember her being really scared over what she saw.


message 13: by Dave (new)

Dave Fritz | 3 comments I highly recommend Homestead: The Glory and Tragedy of an American Steel Town I just got done reading this a month or two ago. It is a very fascinating and sad look at a once great town that basically died when US Steel closed down the works.


message 14: by Wendy (new)

Wendy | 181 comments ♥iLoveBooks♥ wrote: "I read a lot of books by Beverly Lewis who writes a lot of books about Pennsylvania." Do you read any of Barbara Cameron's books? She writes a lot that take place in Lancaster County Amish Country.


message 15: by Natalie (new)

Natalie | 23 comments What Became Of Her by M.E. Kerr is a young adult book that takes place in Bucks County.


message 16: by J.R. (new)

J.R. | 83 comments The majority of my 12 books (mysteries and historicals) are set in Pennsylvania. You can read excerpts and reviews at http://www.amazon.com/author/jrlinder...


message 17: by Natalie (new)

Natalie | 23 comments I love reading books that take place somewhere I'm familiar with; usually the closest I get to my home though is Philly or Lancaster.


message 18: by Wendy (new)

Wendy | 181 comments Natalie wrote: "I love reading books that take place somewhere I'm familiar with; usually the closest I get to my home though is Philly or Lancaster."

me too Natalie. What Part of PA are you from?


message 19: by Natalie (new)

Natalie | 23 comments Wendy wrote: me too Natalie. What Part of PA are you from?"

I'm from the Reading area. And you?


message 20: by Wendy (new)

Wendy | 181 comments Natalie wrote: "Wendy wrote: me too Natalie. What Part of PA are you from?"

I'm from the Reading area. And you?"


I'm from York County. So I go to Gettysburg and Lancaster a lot. I have family in Lancaster county and I love visiting the battlefield in Gettysburg.

I don't know if your interested or not but I was going to try to do a book read for July. http://www.goodreads.com/topic/show/1...


message 21: by Natalie (last edited Sep 01, 2013 09:20PM) (new)

Natalie | 23 comments Wendy wrote: "Natalie wrote: "Wendy wrote: me too Natalie. What Part of PA are you from?"

I'm from the Reading area. And you?"

I'm from York County. So I go to Gettysburg and Lancaster a lot. I have family i..."



I started college at Elizabethtown College (although I transferred after two years). That area is just so beautiful. I have never been to the battlefield believe it or not, but that is someplace that I really want to visit.
I will look into your link now :)


message 22: by Jenn (new)

Jenn (darkstarcassidy) | 3 comments Weird Pennsylvania by Matt Lake


message 23: by Krisi (new)

Krisi Keley | 5 comments Natalie wrote: "I love reading books that take place somewhere I'm familiar with; usually the closest I get to my home though is Philly or Lancaster."

What genres of fiction do you like, Natalie? All of my books take place in the Philly area, at least in part, and my newest fairy tale/mystery series is set in and around Chester County. If you have an e-reader, I'd be happy to offer an e-book copy of any of them. Mareritt is the first book in the fairy tale/mystery series. A large part of the second book, not yet released, takes place near Phoenixville, not far from Reading.

At least two of Alice Sebold's novels are also set in the Philly suburbs: The Lovely Bones and The Almost Moon. I think that some of Dean Koontz's books are set in Pennsylvania too, as he was born here.


message 24: by Wendy (new)

Wendy | 181 comments Jenn wrote: "Weird Pennsylvania by Matt Lake"
lol Yes and it's definitely weird. I put that one on the group bookshelf. I like reading all the folklore and legends.


message 25: by Natalie (new)

Natalie | 23 comments Krisi wrote: "Natalie wrote: "I love reading books that take place somewhere I'm familiar with; usually the closest I get to my home though is Philly or Lancaster."

What genres of fiction do you like, Natalie? ..."


I will pretty much read anything with the exception of Stephen King (nothing against him, I swear!! I am just waaaaay too much of a scaredy cat for his writing! I currently have ventured a little further into what is considered "scary," but not too far. Usually they are young adult books that are about vampires, werewolves, etc.).
I really appreciate your offer for the ebook, however, I am old fashioned and am against digital books (I prefer the smell of the book, the feel of the pages, etc.). I will definitely have to look into your books though; fairy tales and their remakes are some of my favorites!! :)
I actually read The Lovely Bones and I own The Almost Moon. I have a few of Dean Koontz's books as well, but have not had a chance to dig into them yet. I will have to see if any of them take place in PA! It is such a beautiful place; more people should set their books here :)


message 26: by Eden (new)

Eden (tsalagi_writer) | 12 comments Jenn wrote: "Weird Pennsylvania by Matt Lake"

That's a good one.


message 27: by Wendy (new)

Wendy | 181 comments Natalie wrote: "Krisi wrote: "Natalie wrote: "I love reading books that take place somewhere I'm familiar with; usually the closest I get to my home though is Philly or Lancaster."

What genres of fiction do you l..."


Natalie isn't Dean Koontz horror too?


message 28: by Natalie (new)

Natalie | 23 comments Wendy wrote: "Natalie wrote: "Krisi wrote: "Natalie wrote: "I love reading books that take place somewhere I'm familiar with; usually the closest I get to my home though is Philly or Lancaster."

What genres of ..."


Haha, I just looked him up. See where my problems are? There is such a fine line, at least in my opinion, between horror and thrillers, and he has both. I LOVE thrillers. I tend to be more okay with things that COULD happen (like madmen kidnapping and going on mass murder rampages) than things that are impossible (the topic of hauntings is my biggest example, although some people believe in ghosts and could therefore argue this is possible). As I mentioned, over the past few years I have been slowly starting to get into books about vampires, witches, etc. (although I'm still scared to venture into zombies!!), but I tend to choose the more tame/less scary books. The scariest I tend to go is Christopher Pike, and I can't read his books at night!! When books pass the thriller and delve into the possible horror, I have to play it by ear and judge HOW scary it is.


message 29: by Krisi (new)

Krisi Keley | 5 comments Natalie and Wendy,

I haven't read all of Dean Koontz's books, but of those I have read, I'd say a number of them fall more under the supernatural category than true horror. The problem is, I don't think this is a specific, separate genre as far as standard listings go, so sometimes the only way to tell whether a given book leans more towards the supernatural than the horror is to read reviews and check which GR shelves readers tend to put the books on.

Natalie, I'm not sure if any of my books would still be in the genres you're interested in. Although there's definitely a fairy tale theme to Mareritt, it's not really a fairy tale retelling and, like many of Koontz's books, I'd say it leans more towards the supernatural (though I wouldn't say scary supernatural). Also like many of Koontz's books, all of my books, including the vampire books, come from a Catholic worldview, so there's a spiritual aspect too. If you still think you'd be interested in a gift copy of Mareritt, you could message me here on GR about a paperback copy. I do have a few on hand.

I wish I knew more modern fiction authors whose stories take place in Pennsylvania too. I'm looking forward to seeing if more get added to the thread.


message 30: by J.R. (new)

J.R. | 83 comments Krisi and Natalie, all of my novels are set in Pennsylvania. I write both mysteries and historicals. take a look at www.jrlindermuth.net or http://www.amazon.com/author/jrlinder...


message 31: by Krisi (new)

Krisi Keley | 5 comments J.R. wrote: "Krisi and Natalie, all of my novels are set in Pennsylvania. I write both mysteries and historicals. take a look at www.jrlindermuth.net or http://www.amazon.com/author/jrlinder..."

Thanks, J.R. I added Watch the Hour and Fallen from Grace to my Amazon wishlist. Do the Sticks Hetrick mysteries need to be read in order? I'm a big mystery fan too.


message 32: by J.R. (new)

J.R. | 83 comments Thanks, Krisi. It's not necessary to read the Hetrick mysteries in order, though his protege Flora does take a more active role in the more recent books.


message 33: by J.R. (new)

J.R. | 83 comments If you're not from the coal region, why would you care about its history? I'm offering a few reasons here: http://jrlindermuth.blogspot.com/


message 34: by Lauren (last edited Mar 30, 2016 08:10PM) (new)

Lauren | 1 comments I just finished rereading The Winter of Red Snow by Kristiana Gregory. It's a fictional diary that follows an 11 year old girl who lives in Valley Forge during the winter of 1777 and the spring of 1778, when Washington's troops are camped there. Though intended for a younger audience, I still found it to be a very good read as an adult. What's more, it's a quick one, so it won't take you too far off the trail of anything else you're reading at the same time. It takes on special charm because the first time I read it, I think I was still living in Connecticut. Now, I can read it and recognize all the places that were mentioned (including where I lived for a decade, Chester County), and it just adds a new level of fun to reading it.


message 35: by Barb (new)

 Barb Bailey Hello everyone,
I'm new to the group and this looks rather interesting ! Hope you don't mind but I added a few of my favorite books set in PA. I'm retired and from the Harrisburg area, just a few miles outside the city limits! Looking forward to reading and discussing some of the books on your shelves.
all the best Barb


message 36: by Wendy (new)

Wendy | 181 comments Hi Barb. Thanks for adding books to the shelves! I moved the books you added from the Read shelf to the to-read shelf since we haven't collectively read them as a group.


message 37: by Barb (new)

 Barb Bailey great, thanks for the invite !


message 38: by Kurt (new)

Kurt (kurtbdowdle) | 1 comments Hi, Everyone.

My book, Ax & Spade, is a historical thriller, set in Bethlehem, PA in 1870. It's getting excellent reviews, and it's on sale now. Check it out!

http://www.amazon.com/Ax-Spade-Raven-...

Thanks!

Kurt B. Dowdle


message 39: by J.R. (new)

J.R. | 83 comments Fellow Goodreads member Wayne Turmel kicked off a series of interviews with Indie/small press authors by talking with me about Watch The Hour, my novel about Irish immigrants in Pennsylvania's anthracite coal region. You can read the interview here: http://www.wayneturmel.com/2015/06/jr...


message 40: by J.R. (new)

J.R. | 83 comments Something So Divine, an historical mystery novel set in Pennsylvania, has been chosen as Mystery of the Month here. Leave a comment for a chance to win a copy: http://pat-writersforum.blogspot.com/


message 41: by Marie Silk (new)

Marie Silk | 1 comments I have written a historical fiction/psychological fiction series set in 1915 Pennsylvania. The books are shorter (just under 200 pages), suitable for a young adult audience, and include Pennsylvania locations as well as social issues of the time. Immigration, clash of Catholics and Protestants, the difference in lives of the social classes, inheritance discrepancies, the rise of telephones and automobiles, and various English traditions that came to America.

I was worried that I might bore my readers too much with the immigration issue, but myself being the daughter of an immigrant and a refugee, these issues are close to my heart.

One of my favorite parts of the first book is a shopping trip the ladies take to Wanamaker's Department Store in Philadelphia, which is now the Macy's that does the big Thanksgiving Day parades and light festivals.

If anyone is interested in checking my books out, here are the links:

Davenport House (Davenport House #1) by Marie Silk
Davenport House

http://www.amazon.com/Davenport-House...


message 42: by Roger (new)

Roger Kelley | 5 comments I once had the chance to meet John Updike at a book signing quite a few years ago. I was struck by a comment he later made about Pennsylvania. By this time he had relocated to New England. He said, "I left Pennsylvania, but Pennsylvania never left me." I think that whether authors from the state acknowledge it or not, this state has a lasting impact on them.


message 43: by Roger (new)

Roger Kelley | 5 comments I am a newcomer to Goodreads and am a rank novice when it comes to social media. On the other hand, I just published last month a two volume collection of historical stories about people who either came from Pennsylvania or came to Pennsylvania and did something remarkable. It turned out to be a two-volume collection of books, both of which were more than 400 pages. From April 20 to May 20, I am running a giveaway of the 1st volume. The book is entitled, "Empowered: How Pennsylvania transformed America." I'm giving away five copies of the 1st volume and I hope there is some interest among readers in Pennsylvania history.


message 44: by Wendy (new)

Wendy | 181 comments Thanks Roger and Marie for Sharing about your books and their connection to PA. I will have to add them to my list!


message 45: by Roger (new)

Roger Kelley | 5 comments Wendy, thanks so much for the note. I was beginning to wonder if there really were people out there in this forum.


message 46: by Wendy (new)

Wendy | 181 comments Yes, there are a few of us that linger around. I'm going to see if I can get it a little more active. I've tried doing group reads and such but I think I need to try to get the number of members up. Because for an online group there really are not that many of us .


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