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The Picture-Book Club > January 2011: Discuss Our "Wordless Picture Book" Club Reads HERE

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message 1: by Kathryn, The Princess of Picture-Books (new)

Kathryn | 6181 comments Mod
We'll be ringing in the New Year with Wordless Picture Books:

Flotsam (the resounding champion!)

Anno's Journey

Wave

Chalk

You Can't Take a Balloon into the Metropolitan Museum (There is also a "Museum of Fine Arts" version so if you can't get the "Metropolitan Museum" feel welcome to read the "Fine Arts" as I know the basic concept and style are the same.)

Alternate/Sixth Title:
The Lion & the Mouse

I hope you will have a chance to get these given that it's the busy holiday season for most of us. Looking forward to discussing with you in January! :-)


message 2: by Manybooks (new)

Manybooks | 8492 comments Mod
My library does not have either Anno's Journey or Chalk. I will try to get the former through ILL, but as Chalk was published in 2010, I will not be able to request it through our ILL. I've put holds on the ones that are available and look forward to discussing them.


message 3: by Kathryn, The Princess of Picture-Books (new)

Kathryn | 6181 comments Mod
Oh, too bad, Gundula! I'm actually surprised that mine does have Chalk already. Glad you can get most of the others.


message 4: by Manybooks (new)

Manybooks | 8492 comments Mod
Kathryn wrote: "Oh, too bad, Gundula! I'm actually surprised that mine does have Chalk already. Glad you can get most of the others."

My library has this insane rule that they will not do any ILL for books published within the past 24 months, so with anything published in 2008 or later, I am basically SOL if the library does not have a copy.


message 5: by Kathryn, The Princess of Picture-Books (new)

Kathryn | 6181 comments Mod
How weird!


message 6: by [deleted user] (new)

I have all of them on hold, so I should be able to participate this time! :)


message 7: by [deleted user] (new)

Gundula wrote: "Kathryn wrote: "Oh, too bad, Gundula! I'm actually surprised that mine does have Chalk already. Glad you can get most of the others."

My library has this insane rule that they will..."


That is a very unfriendly rule.


message 8: by Kathryn, The Princess of Picture-Books (new)

Kathryn | 6181 comments Mod
Jeannette wrote: "I have all of them on hold, so I should be able to participate this time! :)"

Yay! Cool profile pic, by the way :-)


message 9: by [deleted user] (new)

Thanks! It's our annual Christmas photo, drawn by my daughter.


message 10: by [deleted user] (new)

Thanks, Abigail!

I think the 2 year rule is rather selfish. I could understand 2 months or something, or just putting the ILL into the regular hold queue, but two years is a bit much.


message 11: by Lisa (new)

Lisa Vegan (lisavegan) | 1077 comments Yay! I loved Flotsam, The Lion & The Mouse, and You Can't Take a Balloon (all 3 of them).

I have Wave and Chalk at home from the library!! ;-)

And I think I have Anno's Journey on reserve at the library. I'll double check.

I'm so excited. Another fabulous month.

I'm sorry for those of you who can't get them all.

Generally our regional ILL (called LINK+, and the only one that works) will not lend out books to sister libraries the same calendar year they are published, but then will lend them out. 2 years is a long time.


message 12: by Manybooks (new)

Manybooks | 8492 comments Mod
Jeannette wrote: "Gundula wrote: "Kathryn wrote: "Oh, too bad, Gundula! I'm actually surprised that mine does have Chalk already. Glad you can get most of the others."

My library has this insane rul..."


Very annoying and they don't seem to like it when you make ILL requests either, hopefully I will get them trained a bit.


message 13: by Manybooks (new)

Manybooks | 8492 comments Mod
Abigail wrote: "Jeannette wrote: "Thanks! It's our annual Christmas photo, drawn by my daughter."

Cute! :)

I agree, by the by, that the rule prohibiting requests for anything published in the last two years is ..."


It's one of the main reasons I am not always thrilled when we are reading brand new or rather new books, because if the library doesn't have them, I have to purchase them (I love buying books, but my house is overflowing already and books are getting more expensive, it seems).


message 14: by Lisa (new)

Lisa Vegan (lisavegan) | 1077 comments Books are getting more expensive! I've seen picture books at $20 and typically they seem to be around $16.

Maybe we could have a limit per month on number of new and newer books?

I always complain about my library but, much to my surprise, I think I've been able to find all the books for this club. I've been very grateful and would love it if everybody who wanted to participate could do so.


message 15: by Kathryn, The Princess of Picture-Books (last edited Dec 18, 2010 07:45AM) (new)

Kathryn | 6181 comments Mod
Gundula wrote: It's one of the main reasons I am not always thrilled when we are reading brand new or rather new books, because if the library doesn't have them, I have to purchase them (I love buying books, but my house is overflowing already and books are getting more expensive, it seems).

Please don't feel like you have to purchase the books you can't get through the library, Gundula--unless you really want to add them to your collection! Folks are always welcome to read any or all of the books in a given month, I hope you don't feel like it's mandatory.


message 16: by Kathryn, The Princess of Picture-Books (new)

Kathryn | 6181 comments Mod
Lisa wrote: "Books are getting more expensive! I've seen picture books at $20 and typically they seem to be around $16.

Maybe we could have a limit per month on number of new and newer books?

"


I'd welcome feedback regarding the newer titles and whether we should use them or not. So far, they are popular vote-getters and thus my feeling so far has been that people want to read newer books and discuss them with the group, and I'm here to facilitate and make that happen for you all :-) But I can certainly emphasize that we choose a mixture of newer and older titles. I think it's challenging, though, because unless it's a popular older title, there is no guarantee that libraries will have them, either. (I know some of you can do ILL for free but mine charges $3.00 per book which also gets expensive). Thus, I try to encourage people to check and see if they can actually get the titles through their library before they nominate/vote for them so that we can be sure the books are circulating for the majority of us. But, I'm always open to suggestions! :-) And, again, I hope everyone feels welcome to participate even if they can't get all the books in a given month.


message 17: by Manybooks (new)

Manybooks | 8492 comments Mod
Kathryn wrote: "Gundula wrote: It's one of the main reasons I am not always thrilled when we are reading brand new or rather new books, because if the library doesn't have them, I have to purchase them (I love buy..."

I know, but it's always very tempting, and I don't need much pushing to purchase books, although I am drowning in them at the moment.


message 18: by Manybooks (new)

Manybooks | 8492 comments Mod
Kathryn wrote: "Lisa wrote: "Books are getting more expensive! I've seen picture books at $20 and typically they seem to be around $16.

Maybe we could have a limit per month on number of new and newer books?

"

..."


That is what my policy has been for the past few months, I only nominate books that I know I can get at the library. I might make an exception for a book title I really, really want to read, but generally, I only try to nominate books I know my library has.

I think one of the problems with newer titles is that most of them are American, and while Canadian libraries and libraries in other countries do tend to get these books after a while, they usually are behind US libraries (just like Canadian picture books might not be as easily available in the USA). I do like having a mix of both older and newer titles, but it definitely is a problem getting copies of some of the brand new titles (2009, 2010).


message 19: by Kathryn, The Princess of Picture-Books (new)

Kathryn | 6181 comments Mod
Gundula wrote: "That is what my policy has been for the past few months, I only nominate books that I know I can get at the library. I might make an exception for a book title I really, really want to read, but generally, I only try to nominate books I know my library has.

I think one of the problems with newer titles is that most of them are American, and while Canadian libraries and libraries in other countries do tend to get these books after a while, they usually are behind US libraries (just like Canadian picture books might not be as easily available in the USA). I do like having a mix of both older and newer titles, but it definitely is a problem getting copies of some of the brand new titles (2009, 2010).


That's a great point, Gundula! Well, we will keep trying and thanks for always being such a thoughtful nominator with the books. Since we don't have that many members who actually vote for the books, perhaps what I could try to do is include a few that I know a Canadian member has voted for, thus hoping they are widely available in Canadian libraries.


message 20: by Lisa (new)

Lisa Vegan (lisavegan) | 1077 comments Kathryn wrote: "Since we don't have that many members who actually vote for the books, perhaps what I could try to do is include a few that I know a Canadian member has voted for, thus hoping they are widely available in Canadian libraries."

I think that is a good idea. Now I'm wondering how many international members we have who'd want to participate.

Isn't it crazy that Canadians and Americans can't immediately and easily get "each other's" books?!?


message 21: by Leslie (new)

Leslie (onthemove) I know that I really enjoy newer books, but what about 1 or 2 that are from the past year. I know for me it depends on my library. I can do an inter library loan, but I can also do a Link+ and that is the entire state. So one of the books on the list I had to order from out of the area.
I guess what is hard is for all of us to to get all of the books then have time to read and comment on them. I am luck that I have already read three of the books. But I love Wave so much I might read it again.


message 22: by David (new)

David | 101 comments "Lisa wrote: "Books are getting more expensive! I've seen picture books at $20 and typically they seem to be around $16..."

Bossksellers may frown on this, but I sometimes will go into a bookstore, find a new picturebook that my library doesn't have, or even have on order, & read it, take some notes, then go home & write a review. This of course only works on shorter books, & works for me because I have a couple chain bookstores nearby. I don't buy that many books, & this helps me keep up on newer books, especially when they are being discussed by many others, as we do here.


message 23: by Lisa (new)

Lisa Vegan (lisavegan) | 1077 comments David, I've done that only rarely, and usually when checking out a book to see if I want to buy it for myself or as a gift, but it isn't a bad idea, especially if we're very careful while reading it to keep it in "new" condition.


message 24: by Manybooks (new)

Manybooks | 8492 comments Mod
Lisa wrote: "David, I've done that only rarely, and usually when checking out a book to see if I want to buy it for myself or as a gift, but it isn't a bad idea, especially if we're very careful while reading i..."

I've done that a few times myself, but mostly, I try not to do this. And, the bookstores do frown on it, and at least in Canada, big bookstores like Chapters/Indigo have started playing their music really loudly to discourage that sort of thing. Unfortunately, it also discourages browsing (especially for someone like me, who is rather sensitive to noise).


message 25: by Cheryl , Newbery Club host (new)

Cheryl  (cherylllr) | 6685 comments Mod
I think I'll have to consider reading the picture-books at the store, too. I don't think that sellers should get too uptight about it, though, as at least it gets us in there, and we might buy something else while we're there!

I think reading books for these discussions that aren't brand-new might help enough people to be worthwhile. I'm not aware of my library setting restrictions, but it does seem as if they wait a few months, at least, before buying hyped books.


message 26: by Kathryn, The Princess of Picture-Books (new)

Kathryn | 6181 comments Mod
Thanks for all the feedback regarding the new vs. older books. When the votes come in each month, I will certainly try to take into account a balance of older and newer books, especially where the votes are tied or very close. I hope all of us will be able to read most of the books each month this way.


message 27: by Kathryn, The Princess of Picture-Books (last edited Jan 01, 2011 03:04PM) (new)

Kathryn | 6181 comments Mod
Welcome to the new year and our "Wordless Picture Book" theme for January! I hope you've all managed to find at least a few of the books and are ready to begin discussing once new year's celebrations conclude :-)


message 28: by Manybooks (new)

Manybooks | 8492 comments Mod
I managed to get all of the books except for Chalk. I have not yet read each book individually, but as a foreign language teacher, I would like to say that wordless picture books make an incredible teaching resource not only for children but for adults. And, because they are wordless, they can be used to teach and practice many foreign languages. I have used wordless picture books and wordless graphic novels in the past to teach and especially to practice things like verb forms, adjectives, describing pictures, you name it (much more fun and entertaining than simply having students fill in the blanks). So, when I am reading this month's books, I will also be reading them with the eye of a language instructor, how they would work in a foreign language classroom.


message 29: by Lisa (new)

Lisa Vegan (lisavegan) | 1077 comments Ack! I've read them all. Now I have to remember them all well enough to discuss them. During the week next week I plan to jump in at some point.


message 30: by Kathryn, The Princess of Picture-Books (new)

Kathryn | 6181 comments Mod
Gundula wrote: "I managed to get all of the books except for Chalk. I have not yet read each book individually, but as a foreign language teacher, I would like to say that wordless picture books make an incredible teaching resource not only for children but for adults..."

What a great point, Gundula! Thank you for sharing. I hope you will find some of these titles worthy of sharing with your class :-)


message 31: by Manybooks (new)

Manybooks | 8492 comments Mod
Kathryn wrote: "Gundula wrote: "I managed to get all of the books except for Chalk. I have not yet read each book individually, but as a foreign language teacher, I would like to say that wordless ..."

I think Wave would be an excellent book to use in a beginning language class, as it is not incredibly busy (has quite simple illustrations) and can thus be used for some basic language activities, like counting practice (how many seagulls are there, how many sand dunes etc.) and especially verb drills. I'm not teaching this term, but when I'm teaching German, I am always on the lookout for activities that make verb conjugating more enjoyable. I've used dicing games to practice verb forms, but I think the next time, I will use Wave and the actions of the little girl, the mother, the seagulls, the ocean to practice with my novice students (college students mostly, you would be surprised how much better they learn when one uses a combination of activities and not just drills and filling in the blanks).


message 32: by Lisa (new)

Lisa Vegan (lisavegan) | 1077 comments Gundula wrote: "you would be surprised how much better they learn when one uses a combination of activities and not just drills and filling in the blanks"

I'm positive it would be easier for me to learn a new language using these techniques.


message 33: by Ronyell (new)

Ronyell (rabbitearsblog) | 213 comments I have read Flotsam and The Lion and the Mouse awhile back and here's what I thought about them:

The Lion & the Mouse -Jerry Pinkney's illustrations were just so gorgeous! I loved the African setting of the story and I thought it was cute about what the mouse did for the lion towards the end of the book. I'm definitely reading more of Jerry Pinkney's works in the future!

Flotsam - This was one of the most amazing wordless picture books I have ever read! David Wiesner did a great job at illustrating this book and I loved the way that we get to see the undersea world through the boy's eyes. It was such an amazing experience!


message 34: by Cheryl , Newbery Club host (new)

Cheryl  (cherylllr) | 6685 comments Mod
I cannot believe Wave was bound so poorly. In the pages before the girl stepped into the wave and started splashing around, she's right in the crease, and cut off.

Other than that, good book. I'm not good at understanding/ appreciating wordless books so I had to "read" this three times before I felt qualified to evaluate it - but I do know like it. This child would certainly be a handful, I imagine!


message 35: by Lisa (new)

Lisa Vegan (lisavegan) | 1077 comments Oh gosh, I've read them all, and some because of this group, and I still haven't participated. Ack! I'll mark this thread as unread so I won't forget to jump in when I have some time. Funny how it takes some time to write about wordless books!


message 36: by Cheryl , Newbery Club host (new)

Cheryl  (cherylllr) | 6685 comments Mod
I too wondered about the hunters in Pinkney's gorgeous book - we didn't see their faces after all, so it might have been neat if they were truly 'generic' or unseen in any detail. I also wonder if owls in the Serengeti do say "Who who whoo" - after all most American owls don't actually.

Barring that, the book was near perfect, from cover and endpapers through title page and story pp. The expressions on the faces were priceless. And how wonderful to make the fable *more* believable by taking out the dialogue.


message 37: by Cheryl , Newbery Club host (new)

Cheryl  (cherylllr) | 6685 comments Mod
I understand why some would like the Balloon/Museum story, but trying to follow it gave me a headache. And I'm so mad the the dog-walker's book isn't real!


message 38: by Cheryl , Newbery Club host (new)

Cheryl  (cherylllr) | 6685 comments Mod
Chalk was awesome. I didn't like the stereo-typical gender behaviors, but the paintings and the concept were wonderful.


message 39: by Manybooks (last edited Jan 04, 2011 11:00AM) (new)

Manybooks | 8492 comments Mod
Cheryl wrote: "I cannot believe Wave was bound so poorly. In the pages before the girl stepped into the wave and started splashing around, she's right in the crease, and cut off.

Other than that, good book. I'..."


Cheryl, I'm not good at understanding wordless picture books either. I actually really liked "Wave" because there were not too many illustrations, it was not "too busy" and too complicated for me (sounds a bit strange, but I am usually quite bad at picture puzzles etc. and much better at reading and understanding words). I've had a quick look at "Anno's Journey" and "Flotsam" and although both of the books are awesome, I know that I am missing quite a lot, especially in "Anno's Journey" (I really wish the author/illustrator had left a detailed list of all of the paintings, stories, literary characters etc. that could be found in it, along with the page numbers, it would have made it easier for me, and more fun -- I did find the Pied Piper of Hamelin and I love the scene with the big turnip, as that is actually a German folktale, or maybe even pan-European which I have used for pronunciation practice when teaching). But, so far, "Wave" is definitely my favourite. There is only a tiny question about "Wave" that I do want to pose. I kind of wish that the mother would have been more visible in the background, or that the little girl would have worn a floatation device or some other safety mechanism. It did not take from my enjoyment of the book, but the sea can be very dangerous and proper adult supervision is important, in my opinion.


message 40: by Manybooks (new)

Manybooks | 8492 comments Mod
Cheryl wrote: "I too wondered about the hunters in Pinkney's gorgeous book - we didn't see their faces after all, so it might have been neat if they were truly 'generic' or unseen in any detail. I also wonder if..."

I was actually wondering if they were hunters, or were trying to capture a lion for a zoo or a circus. Anyone else have the same thoughts?


message 41: by Kathryn, The Princess of Picture-Books (last edited Jan 04, 2011 11:18AM) (new)

Kathryn | 6181 comments Mod
I have read all but Chalk and Anno's Journey before and think I will have to check out Wave and The Lion & the Mouse again so I can respond more properly to the comments/questions here since it's been too long for me to remember more than my general impressions. I am excited to see such a lively discussion going already! :-)

Like some of you, wordless picture books are a bit of a challenge for me, too; I have always been more drawn to the words than the pictures in children's books, even as a kid, though I do really love the art aspect, too. I need to pause or reread sometimes to make sure I am following the story well enough without words!


message 42: by Lisa (new)

Lisa Vegan (lisavegan) | 1077 comments I'm sorry; I'm so frantically busy that I didn't review my reviews of these six books. If I had I could make more interesting comments. And maybe I will later in the month, but for now I just wanted to at least participate in the thread, so:

So, I can't remember which wordless picture books I ever read before Goodreads. Is Harold and the Purple Crayon wordless? (I should check my copy.)

But, since joining Goodreads, I found Flotsam, and I really fell in love with it, and then I was open to reading other wordless books. Flotsam is great for children interested in science, beach hunts, photography, etc. etc.

Words have always been the favorite parts of books for me too, but I've worked with so many people with learning difficulties, especially children, and these books are a way to absorb a story, to read, etc. etc. They're so great because they're not "baby books." I think the best versions of this genre also have to be particularly adept at telling a story. Must be fun for artists to "write" a story!

I'd also read You Can't Take a Balloon into the Metropolitan Museum and the two other museum books. I loved them. No headaches here! I wish there were going to be more. Each of the three has its own particular strengths. I so wish there was going to be one for the Art Institute in Chicago and one for one/more San Francisco museums. They're all great ways to learn about art, the city in which they take place, history, etc.

I'd also read The Lion & the Mouse and thought it was amazing, both for the art and as a version of that tale.

The other three I read when they were nominated here and I found them because of this group. (Thank you!!!!)

I thought that Anno's Journey was fabulous! That one can take quite a while to read. I like the aspect of the find Anno on the pages. Some kids will love that. I loved how various history, folk tales, etc. were interspersed within the pages throughout the book.

I also loved Wave. Great art, great story. Very easy to read. And the youngest child can read it for themselves. Great for pre-readers. Well, they all are.

If I'm remembering correctly, I think that Chalk was probably my least favorite of the books, but I did enjoy it. I wanted to like the art more than I did, but I did admire it. A bit scary. Great for dinosaur loving kids.


message 43: by ABC (new)

ABC (mary6543) | 341 comments "The Lion and The Mouse" I love the detailed illustrations. The lion's expressions are so cute. Cheryl and Abigail~~I too wondered about the hunters. I was thinking they perhaps symbolized slavery??? There are two white (well, perhaps white) men enslaving the lion. Perhaps it can be compared to white men enslaving Africans and bringing them to America???? (I am guessing on this.)

"The Wave" Love the girl's inquisitiveness. This book reminded my son of stories from when we went to the beach. I have to say, it makes me kind of nervous--I know her mom is nearby, but waves can be strong and I am always scared to let ds play like that! lol

"Flotsam" There is a lot to look at in this book. A lot of imagination. A good book to read along with "Wave." I wonder who took the underwater photos, maybe a fish or a mermaid, lol?


message 44: by [deleted user] (new)

I loved the Lion and the Mouse, first for the beautiful illustrations, including the fantastic facial expressions of the lion and the mouse. I think the hunters were never shown because they weren't important to the story as individuals. They were just two nameless, faceless poachers out of many. This was a very interesting retelling of a classic fable.

I have mixed feelings about Wave. I loved the simple drawings of the birds and of the girl's changing attitude towards the wave. I didn't care for the medium used to create the wave; it looked "oily" to me. And I agree. the binding was poorly done, cutting off parts of the picture.

I didn't care at all for Anno's Journey. I just couldn't see the story, couldn't identify Anno. So, I didn't know if the journey was through time, or different places. The tiny drawings didn't help, either.


message 45: by Leslie (new)

Leslie (onthemove) There are so many things to say about these books. I would love to see a poll about favorites now that some of us have read them all.

My son and I did not the French cat book in fact I was a bit shocked this book was included in the list. After the husband slaps the wife, we stopped reading it.

We really enjoyed Floatsam, but for some reason it didn't give us that warm feeling like Wave did. Wave to me was the perfect book. Since my son is only four he was able to really take the book and discuss it. I love how simple it is, just really her and the Wave.

We have two or three more books to read on the list, so we will write more later.

One thing that Floatsam did that I didn't really enjoy was the things in the pictures that were not real, I didn't really like that. Like the UFO's and the mechanical fish, Why?

Enough for now, thanks for this months books, they are really making us search for these titles and reading.


message 46: by [deleted user] (new)

I liked the idea in Chalk of pictures coming to life. And it would be just like a boy to draw something dangerous. I thought the ending was kind of creepy, watching the dinosaur disintegrate. And, I'm not quite sure why the children "gave" their chalk to the plastic dinosaur -- a peace offering, penance, a memorial wreath? Cool idea, but a bit odd overall.

I thought "You Can't Take a Balloon..." was rather silly. It might be a fun read with a child, if it wasn't so busy. I'm not sure what the point of the story was, at least for a child reader. The balloon served as a tour guide through Boston, I suppose. It bugged me, too, that they were willing to leave grandma sitting outside, for a long time, just because of a balloon.


message 47: by Manybooks (new)

Manybooks | 8492 comments Mod
Jeannette wrote: "I liked the idea in Chalk of pictures coming to life. And it would be just like a boy to draw something dangerous. I thought the ending was kind of creepy, watching the dinosaur disintegrate. An..."

I'm finding both "Flotsam" and "You can't take a Balloon" way too busy as well. I like the stories, but they are really difficult to understand, with way too much detail for me (I need simpler pictures). And, even though I liked the premise for "Anno's Journey" the vast amount of details and the greenish colours of the, as you have pointed out, rather small illustrations made reading and enjoying the "story" or the vignette's rather a chore. I would have liked the book a lot more if there had been more information about what to look for in the illustrations, I felt rather lost much of the time.


message 48: by Lisa (new)

Lisa Vegan (lisavegan) | 1077 comments Jeannette, For Anno's Journey, did you read the note at the back? I read it after I "read" the book and I still enjoyed the book, but knowing the background of the pictures might help readers enjoy the book more.

As far as the You Can't Take a Balloon books, yes, I guess they are silly, and I guess I sometimes like silly. If you don't like the Met book, you're not likely to enjoy the others. I think they get even more silly.


message 49: by [deleted user] (new)

I liked Flotsam for the first half, especially all the fantastical images of the underwater worlds. These are the kind of pictures that need to be studied, and they are interesting enough to make the reader want to. (I'm a fan of Grahame Base's Animalia). The problem with this book is that it doesn't know when to quit. First there is the boy on the beach, then the camera and all the images witihin. To finish the story, you have the series of pictures-within-pictures, ending with the old-fasioned boy waving to the camera. For me, this is where the book should have ended. But, more pages of interesting scenes as the camera travels to a new destination. By the time you get through all of those, there isn't time left to study the first pictures. A shorter book would have worked better for me. I do love the illustrations!


message 50: by [deleted user] (new)

I like silly books, but I tend to feel that with silly, shorter is best. This book is just so jam-packed with pictures, and most of them aren't familiar to me, so to really enjoy the book you would have to read the notes. From the standpoint of reading this book out-loud, that's too much work. It would be great for a detail-oriented kid to sift through -- like my daughter who was always "reading" Where's Waldo. I guess I like a nice tight story, silly or not.


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