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Picture of the Day > December's Favorite Pictures

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message 1: by Carol (new)

Carol (goodreadscomcarolann) | 1140 comments I am looking forward to seeing these paintings (going to the Frick Museum on Dec. 9th).

[image error]
Whistler, Symphony in Flesh Colour and Pink: Portrait of Mrs Frances Leyland, 1871-1874
oil on canvas
77 1/8 in. x 40 1/4 in. (195.9 cm x 102.24 cm)
Henry Clay Frick Bequest


[image error]
El Greco, Purification of the Temple, c. 1600, oil on canvas
16 1/2 in. x 20 5/8 in. (41.91 cm x 52.39 cm)
Henry Clay Frick Bequest


message 2: by Chrissie (new)

Chrissie Carol, the first one is just gorgeous! Fun to see the real thing!


message 3: by Fran (last edited Dec 02, 2010 01:36AM) (new)

Fran | 58 comments Bartolomé Estéban Murillo (1618 - 1682)

A Girl and Her Duenna. c. 1670. Oil on canvas. The National Gallery of Art, Washington, DC


message 4: by Fran (last edited Dec 02, 2010 01:33AM) (new)

Fran | 58 comments Bartolomé Estéban Murillo (1618 - 1682)

Beggar Boys Eating Grapes and Melon
Ca. 1645/46

Canvas, 145,9 x 103,6 cm
Probably acquired in 1698 by Duke Max Emanuel
Inv.-Nr. 605


message 5: by Fran (last edited Dec 02, 2010 01:43AM) (new)

Fran | 58 comments Martirio de San Mauricio
El Greco
1580-82
Monasterio de San Lorenzo de El Escorial
448 x 301 cm.
Oleo sobre lienzo
Manierismo


message 6: by Carol (new)

Carol (goodreadscomcarolann) | 1140 comments Thanks Fran, I am not familiar with this Baroque religious painter of Spain. I like his genre and religious artwork.

According to the National Gallery of Art website the two women at a window were courtesans (which surprised me). "Its title, Las Gallegas (The Galician Women), implied that the women were prostitutes, because Galicia, a poor province in western Spain, provided many of Seville's courtesans." http://www.nga.gov/fcgi-bin/tinfo_f?o...

He also did a series on the prodigal son.
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[image error]
The Return of the Prodigal Son, 1667/1670, National Gallery of Art

Murillo was a member of the Hermandad de la Caridad, a lay brotherhood devoted to acts of charity, and this large canvas was one of a series he painted for the brotherhood's church in Seville. The brotherhood's leader called them "six hieroglyphs that explain six works of charity." The story of the prodigal son, told in Luke 15:11-32, was commonly used in the seventeenth century to focus on themes of forgiveness and resurrection.

[image error]
The Prodigal son feeding the swine

more Prodigal son paintings: http://www.artsunlight.com/artist-NM/...


message 7: by Carol (new)

Carol (goodreadscomcarolann) | 1140 comments Great El Greco artwork!

One more, I am drawn to his later work with his brushwork and vibrant colors.
[image error]
The Vision of Saint John, 1608–14, The Metropolitan Museum of Art


message 8: by Fran (new)

Fran | 58 comments his last major work 1882 Le Bar aux Folies-Bergère ,Somerset House ,London
Manet is always fascinating, but this is one of my favorites, The waitress seems to say us something ... and the mirror reflects reality


message 9: by Fran (last edited Dec 03, 2010 11:17AM) (new)

Fran | 58 comments Carol wrote: "Thanks Fran


Thank you for the links and inf



message 10: by Ruth (new)

Ruth | 1948 comments Fran wrote: "his last major work 1882 Le Bar aux Folies-Bergère ,Somerset House ,London
Manet is always fascinating, but this is one of my favorites, The waitress seems to say us something ... and the mirror re..."


All sorts of puzzles in this one--the waitress's reflection is off, if that's the reflection of the mustached man where is he standing, etc.


message 11: by Fran (last edited Dec 03, 2010 11:26AM) (new)

Fran | 58 comments Carol wrote: "Great El Greco artwork!

The Vision of Saint John, 1608–14, The Metropolitan Museum of Art"


In my opinion one of the most amazing paintings by El Greco, surprisingly, was accepted without criticism by his contemporaries,perhaps by the religious mysticism of the time.............


message 12: by Heather (new)

Heather | 4 comments Ruth wrote: All sorts of puzzles in this one--the waitress's reflection is off, if that's the reflection of the mustached man where is he standing, etc.

You're right, Ruth. One can stare at this painting forever and come up with more questions than answers. That is one thing I really like about this work, the mystery is captivating in and of itself.


message 13: by Ruth (new)

Ruth | 1948 comments I've been working on a poem about it forever,and I just can't get it tamed.


message 14: by Heather (new)

Heather | 4 comments
Henri Matisse: La Coiffeur, 1901


message 15: by Ed (new)

Ed Smiley | 871 comments Ruth wrote: "Fran wrote: "his last major work 1882 Le Bar aux Folies-Bergère ,Somerset House ,London
Manet is always fascinating, but this is one of my favorites, The waitress seems to say us something ... and ..."


The reflections are definitely off. The encounter with the customer reflected in the mirror, seems psychologically to be the inclusion of an event at another time than that of the frontal figure. And the luscious orange fruit, and the glowing suspended balls of the the light, and the extra blush seeming to indicate the barmaid may be sampling her own wares.


message 16: by Rosana (new)

Rosana | 12 comments I found this group a few days ago and have been reading through older posts. I decided to introduce myself with a painting I stumbled into on a trip to the Guggenheim in Feb. I loved the strength of this woman and how her husband – the painter František Kupka - portrayed her. His love for her is obvious, isn’t it?



Planes by Colour - František Kupka, 1909-10


message 17: by Lobstergirl (new)

Lobstergirl We had a poster of that Girl and her Duenna at our house when I was growing up. I always figured a duenna was a chaperone. I see now that the NGA has renamed the painting "Two Women at a Window." The painting "remains a puzzle," says the NGA. It could be courtesans, or not.


message 18: by Heather (new)

Heather | 4 comments Capitu wrote: "I found this group a few days ago and have been reading through older posts. I decided to introduce myself with a painting I stumbled into on a trip to the Guggenheim in Feb. I loved the strength..."

Hey Capitu! Welcome to the group, glad you could join us and thanks for participating already!

I have never seen that particular painting, but I really like it. Thanks for sharing!


message 19: by Ruth (last edited Dec 06, 2010 09:08AM) (new)

Ruth | 1948 comments Hi Capitu, nice to see you here.


message 20: by Monica (new)

Monica | 909 comments Where's the painting Two Women at a Window? I'm confused>


message 21: by Fran (last edited Dec 06, 2010 09:46AM) (new)

Fran | 58 comments Monica wrote: "Where's the painting Two Women at a Window? I'm confused>"
Gallegas en la ventana (two women in a window, ,The girl and her Dueña) is in the National Gallery of Art of Washington, DC,

http://www.nga.gov/


message 22: by Rosana (new)

Rosana | 12 comments Ruth wrote: "Hi Capitu, nice to see you here."

Hi there, Ruth. Somehow I was not surprised to see you in this group...


message 23: by Monica (new)

Monica | 909 comments description
Bartolomé Esteban Murillo
Spanish, 1617 - 1682
Two Women at a Window, c. 1655/1660
oil on canvas

Are we referring to this painting? Sorry, Fran. Yes we are. I better go back and read previous posts! It's a nice painting.


message 24: by Fran (last edited Dec 07, 2010 09:32AM) (new)

Fran | 58 comments
Frans Hals
Malle Babbe,c.1630. Oil on canvas, 75cm by 64cm. Gemäldegalerie


message 25: by Carol (new)

Carol (goodreadscomcarolann) | 1140 comments Wikipedia -- By not properly reading an inscription, Malle Babbe van Haerlem, on the inside the of the picture frame, the painting was for a long time mislabeled as Hille Bobbe. Given the somewhat unconventional appearance of the subject along with the placement of the owl, the painting was also known as The Witch of Haarlem. However the subject matter of Frans Hals in his other paintings would suggest that the painting is probably of a pub scene.

Research in the Netherlands municipality of Haarlem showed that a real Malle Babbe actually existed. She was included in a list of residents of a work house (Het Dolhuys), which served as a host for the mentally ill. Around 1642, Pieter Hals, a son of Frans Hals, was also in this work house. Hals and this Malle Babbe had probably already met by this time, as she was a known personality in Haarlem, although none other of her biographical details survive.

The Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City is in possession of a nearly identical painting (below). It is not clear who the creator of this painting is. In the past it was also attributed to Frans Hals, but it is now thought to be the work of one of his pupils.

[image error]
Malle Babbe, MET painting


Bronze Malle Babbe, by Kees Verkade in 1978, located on Barteljorisstraat, Haarlem


message 26: by Carol (new)

Carol (goodreadscomcarolann) | 1140 comments
Thomas Moran, Cliffs of the Upper Colorado River, Wyoming Territory, 1882, oil on canvas, Smithsonian American Art Museum.


message 27: by Fran (last edited Dec 08, 2010 08:10AM) (new)

Fran | 58 comments [image error]
Diego Velázquez, 1636-1637 Barroco
'Pablo de Valladolid o Retrato de un actor célebre en tiempo de Felipe IV''

oil on canvas

212,4 cm × 125 cm
Museo del Prado, Madrid, España
http://www.museodelprado.es/en


message 28: by Monica (new)

Monica | 909 comments Carol I love that Thomas Moran painting!! I don't think I've never heard of him! Beautiful!! http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thomas_M...


message 29: by Fran (new)

Fran | 58 comments
The Fifer
Édouard Manet 1866
oil
160 cm × 97 cm (63 in × 38 in)
Musée d'Orsay, Paris
http://www.musee-orsay.fr/


message 30: by Monica (new)

Monica | 909 comments My ma thinks her dad's black Irish roots were from Galacia. Poor they have been, but if my grandpa was any example, they certainly were beautiful!


message 31: by Fran (last edited Dec 09, 2010 11:14PM) (new)

Fran | 58 comments

The Hunters in the Snow
Pieter Brueghel the Elder
1565
Oil on wood
117 cm × 162 cm
Kunsthistorisches Museum[1], Vienna,
http://www.khm.at/
wonderful winter painting very poetic


message 32: by Carol (new)

Carol (goodreadscomcarolann) | 1140 comments Thanks Fran! Love this painting.


message 33: by Jim (new)

Jim | 147 comments I came across an article about Peter Greenway who is recreating famous paintings visually
- the one here recreated is THE LAST SUPPER
there's a You tube video that can be accessed on the site which is New York Magazine

Dec 14, 2010



Dear A-Listers,

Don't miss the amazing multimedia exploration of da Vinci's masterpiece by visionary artist and filmmaker Peter Greenaway, LEONARDO'S LAST SUPPER: A VISION BY PETER GREENAWAY, now through January 6, 2011 at Park Avenue Armory!

Click here for details.


message 34: by Heather (new)

Heather | 4 comments Mannerism, the artistic style which gained popularity in the period following the High Renaissance, takes as its ideals the work of Raphael and Michelangelo Buonarroti. It is considered to be a period of technical accomplishment but also of formulaic, theatrical and overly stylized work.


Raphael: The Small Cowper Madonna


Michelangelo Buonarroti: David, detail of the copy outside the Palazzo Vecchio in Florence

Mannerist Art is characterized by a complex composition, with muscular and elongated figures in complex poses. Discussing Michelangelo in his journal, Eugène Delacroix gives as good a description as any of the limitations of Mannerism:

"[A]ll that he has painted is muscles and poses, in which even science, contrary to general opinion, is by no means the dominant factor... He did not know a single one of the feelings of man, not one of his passions. When he was making an arm or a leg, it seems as if he were thinking only of that arm or leg and was not giving the slightest consideration to the way it relates with the action of the figure to which it belongs, much less to the action of the picture as a whole... Therein lies his great merit; he brings a sense of the grand and the terrible into even an isolated limb."


Prominent Members

In addition to Michelangelo, leading Mannerist artists included Rosso Fiorentino, Pontormo, and Parmigianino.


Rosso Fiorentino: Le Défi des Piérides, 1765


Pontormo: Monsignor Della Casa

By the late 16th century, there were several anti-Mannerist attempts to reinvigorate art with greater naturalism and emotionalism. These developed into the Baroque style, which dominated the 17th century.


message 35: by Monica (new)

Monica | 909 comments Dear Jim--there's no link in message 33.

For the longest time the maniera was poo-pooed. Don't look to Delacroix for sympathy or understanding, rather start with John Shearman.

Something is amiss with the second image. It's too small to recognize as a work of Rosso's. Is it a tapestry after one of his stetches? It looks like a watercolor. Rosso was long departed by 1765.


message 36: by Monica (last edited Dec 14, 2010 03:06PM) (new)

Monica | 909 comments description
The Challenge of the Muses Rosso Fiorentino (1524-27) ??

description

After the Sack of Rome Rosso went to France and worked on the Gallerie of Francois Ier at Fontainbleau. There he met and apprenticed Primaticcio, in essence, bringing the Renaissance to France.

The Blue Guide web site from which the image was found, says Rosso's Challenge of the Muses panel is from the Louvre and depicts a story in Ovid's Metamorphoses, Book 5, explained on the Met timeline as a depiction of:

"... nine Pierides, daughters of King Pierus of Emathia, are turned into magpies after losing the singing contest to which they challenged the nine Muses. The scene is set at one of the sacred sources on Mount Helicon or Mount Parnassus."

For an outline of Metamorphosis Book 5 see bullet #13 here:
http://www.shmoop.com/metamorphoses/b...

Frustratingly, no Rosso image of this work can be found on the Louvre site. It reminds me of Pontormo's series on The Life of St Joseph. Now, I'm swimming the web in Berlin trying to see a decent image of Rosso's Portrait of a Man in Black at the Gemäldegalerie. Basically I want to say, "thank you Heather!"


message 37: by Heather (new)

Heather | 4 comments Nassos Daphnis, an Artist of Geometry

A Greek-American artist who deployed brilliantly colored geometric forms in precise formal relationships to create nervous, dynamic paintings on a heroic scale.


Mr. Daphnis used bold colors and shapes in his canvases, like “Dancing Spheres,” from 1988


Palace in Minos, 1988


Sphere, Expoxy on novaply, 1968


Matter in Outer Space, 1995


Magna on canvas, 1958


message 38: by Jim (new)

Jim | 147 comments Very Cool Stuff - really like Matter in Outer Space


message 39: by Ed (new)

Ed Smiley | 871 comments Fran wrote: "

The Hunters in the Snow
Pieter Brueghel the Elder
1565
Oil on wood
117 cm × 162 cm
Kunsthistorisches Museum[1], Vienna,
http://www.khm.at/
wonderful winter painting very poetic"


I've seen the original and had a reproduction on my walls for a number of years. The composition is endless, you can look at it forever. Every form in the painting is echoed throughout it. A peaked roof reappears as a mountain. Black birds flying in one direction, little black figures going in the other. And all the silly winter frolic on the ice, is in poignant contrast to the unsuccessful hunters and their lean dogs.


message 40: by Ed (last edited Dec 17, 2010 11:01PM) (new)

Ed Smiley | 871 comments Here's a late de Kooning:

And another:



message 41: by Ruth (new)

Ruth | 1948 comments DeKooning was painting like that as he sank into Alzheimers.


message 42: by Ed (new)

Ed Smiley | 871 comments Ruth wrote: "DeKooning was painting like that as he sank into Alzheimers."

Yes, it's a very interesting question, and it drives critics nuts! If art criticism is about understanding the artist's intent, then what if you are not sure if there was intent?

Most of his work kept a lot of balls in the air at once and tried to keep several incompatible things together in a dynamic tension.

Oddly enough, it you showed the earlier work to some people who were not familiar with modern art they'd probably think they were the works of senility, and that the last works were done earlier (the paint handling, is messy, painterly).


His late work, has a certain classicism and sparseness, perhaps he felt he needed to pare it down to control it. So did he mean this, or was it motor memory (these late paintings, if you move a part lose their balance, they are very composed, he seems to have remembered every trick of composition)? These are very big paintings he had to control, around 70" square. So I would have to say that he was pretty focussed on what he was doing as long as it was on an easel.

Another part of the puzzle is that when he developed memory problems, he would draw visitors, and then after drawing them, would recognize them. So it looks like the painting was the last to go.

I remember having a funny feeling about them when I saw them in the eighties, as they were not edgy, as I expected him to be edgy. But I have come to see a great deal of elegance in them.

Ultimately, I guess if you enjoy them and they say something to you, then maybe that's what mattered.


message 43: by Ed (last edited Dec 18, 2010 12:26AM) (new)

Ed Smiley | 871 comments Here's one from mid career. Look how he is managing the discontinuity, barely keeping it from all flying apart. Letting the image of the woman and the paint as paint fight it out. That's the tension the glimpsing the sliding, a lot edgier. That's the look he was famous for.




message 44: by Heather (new)

Heather | 4 comments
Painting Title: Self Portrait 1973
Francis Bacon
Famous Irish born English artist - 20th Century Painter

About the Self Portrait Painting
Francis Bacon was no easier on himself as a subject, as he was with others. He depicted himself just as he did with his sitters. In this self portrait the artist be suffering from a hangover. He could also be referring to time and death. Is the artist simply suffering from a headache or is his hidden wrist bleeding into the sink?

"My painting is a representation of life, my own life above all, which has been very difficult. So perhaps my painting is very violent, but this is natural to me." Francis Bacon Quote

I agree that Bacon is a talented artist, but violent, yes. Will anyone share thoughts on personally appreciating his work? I need some new perspectives...


message 45: by Ruth (new)

Ruth | 1948 comments I was lucky enough to attend a huge Francis Bacon show at the Los Angeles Co Museum of Art many years ago. It bowled me over. It's powerful stuff, the stuff of nightmares, the stuff of the twisting of emotions, the stuff of psychological breakdown. I think he was a genius.


message 46: by Roxanne (new)

Roxanne (roxannebcb) Heather wrote: "
Painting Title: Self Portrait 1973
Francis Bacon
Famous Irish born English artist - 20th Century Painter

About the Self Portrait Painting
Francis Bacon was no easier on himself as a subject, as ..."


After Bacon died the executors went into his infamous studio to clean and salvage and, probably, to sell. They discovered many medical books on deformities and surgeries and such. Bacon had always emphatically stated that his paintings were from models and his imagination. However, after his death it was discovered that he had access to medical books depicting the very same deformities that he had been painting. Picasso and Matisse also used photography to base paintings on. Not that their paintings were realistic depictions of the photos, but that they did use photos as an inspiration and a starting point.


message 47: by Heather (new)

Heather | 4 comments That's interesting, Roxanne! I didn't know that. Of course, I don't know too much about Bacon but thank you for the information!


message 48: by Heather (new)

Heather | 4 comments Thank you Ruth and Roxanne.

I want to post these next pictures in light of the upcoming holiday. I don't mean any offense to anyone by posting these. I just got tickets to see his exhibit and I am looking forward to it...


Self Portrait Carl Bloch

The BYU Museum of Art welcomes the works of renowned artist Carl Bloch for the first time out of their native Denmark. His thoughtful depictions of the Savior have had profound influence on the lives of Christians all over the world. Bloch's portrayals of Christ possess a unique and timeless quality. They pull viewers into their story by engaging directly with the moral conflict and humanizing their characters'struggles. They affirm Christ's mission of salvation and challenge the viewer to contemplate what it means to have living faith, a principle the artist lived his life by.

Bloch was born in Denmark in 1834. He was born and raised Lutheran and practiced their faith for the duration of his life. After discovering and pursuing a passion for art in his youth, Bloch attended the prestigious Royal Danish Academy of Art in Copenhagen. Though a faithful Christian, it was not until later in his career that he began painting the Savior. Because of his acclaimed work, Bloch was later commissioned to paint twenty-three depictions of the Savior's life in the Frederiksborg Castle. Later he was commissioned by various congregations in Denmark and Sweden to create religious altarpieces, several of which will be featured in the exhibition.


Christus Consolator 1884

With outstretched arms, Christ beckons all to come unto Him; He comforts the downtrodden, heals the infirm, lifts the sinner, and blesses the children.


Christ in Gethsemane 1879

Bloch interprets the scriptural text with great sensitivity; the angel tenderly and compassionately embraces the Savior as He takes upon Himself the sins and infirmities of all mankind.


Christ Healing the Sick at Bethesda 1883

Bloch includes viewers in the painting; several characters look outward, making eye contact, and the steps of the pool curve inward, including the viewer in the scene.


The Doubting Thomas 1881

Rather than depicting Thomas's act of touching the Savior's wounds as is often represented, Bloch captures the moment of Thomas's recognition of the Resurrected Christ.


Christ and the Young Child 1873

Viewers cannot help but observe the loving, protective relationship as Christ affectionately puts His hand on the child's cheek and gestures toward him.


message 49: by Ruth (new)

Ruth | 1948 comments His work's a little saccharine for me.


message 50: by Dottie (new)

Dottie (oxymoronid) Heather I liked the Gethsemane painting as it is not the one with which I am most familiar - the image of Christ kneeling at the rock to pray.


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