jigsawfiction discussion

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as we were saying

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message 1: by Christos (new)

Christos Tsiailis (christosrodoullatsiailis) | 19 comments Mod
as we were saying, this prop-group invites you to site (summarising) what partial plot you think is puzzling enough (in a novel, story or any other kind of prose writing THAT YOU WROTE OR READ), to be worth adding in a group named jigsaw-fiction!
Any genre is accepted, no restrictions, no strings.


message 2: by Christos (new)

Christos Tsiailis (christosrodoullatsiailis) | 19 comments Mod
I start with the scene of Mal-Akh in the Lost Symbol where he transforms to a monster of power in the greek island. Why would Dan Brown play with his gender (or sexual origin) if this was not of any use in the rest of the story? Perhaps I am missing something there...


message 3: by Christos (new)

Christos Tsiailis (christosrodoullatsiailis) | 19 comments Mod
I couldn't agree with you more. I believe Dan Brown managed to both de-humanize Mal-Akh and to make us sympathise after we realise who he really is!


message 4: by Christos (new)

Christos Tsiailis (christosrodoullatsiailis) | 19 comments Mod
Actually, it is well-known that all ancient Greeks were bisexuals and considered the act of being very intimate with their best friends very natural. Every philosophical symposium was preceeded by sexual encounters that were believed to bring enlightment to the philosophers. As far as Great Alexander is concerned, his continuous expeditions and his reputation demanded him to be a symbol of manhood, to be "andreios" which translates to "macho" or "manly". Therefore the building of his legend would require some sculpturing. Both Hephaistion and Alexander were quite to the feminin side, that is why the defence to his name is even more exaggerated. As far as the book you mention is concerned, I haven't read it, so I cannot make any speculations.


message 5: by Christos (new)

Christos Tsiailis (christosrodoullatsiailis) | 19 comments Mod
thanks for the book suggestion, I'll see to it. I think everybody shies away from it. :) I do too. And I don't want to be the first author in my country to "touch" the matter openly. Not before I am sixty :) And I'm still at my mid thirties.


message 6: by Christos (new)

Christos Tsiailis (christosrodoullatsiailis) | 19 comments Mod
:) they have, indeed


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