Q&A with Steve Morris discussion

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Press and Reviews

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message 1: by Steve (new)

Steve Morris | 250 comments Mod
A couple of magazines and three newspapers have promised to feature "Jumble Tales".

The latest of which will be a newspaper, the book editor of which contacted me at 10:30PM last night. It is amazing what hours people work these days.
I was up marking exams alas.....and later the dog still wanted another walk! No rest...

As the reviews appear, I shall post them to:
http://www.facebook.com/SteveMorrisst...
and
http://www.s-morris.co.uk
unless they are very scathing!

I question the agenda was of that lady on Amazon.co.uk? Jeffrey Archer indeed!


message 2: by Steve (new)

Steve Morris | 250 comments Mod
There is an interview an feature about "Jumble Tales" on "Written in Blood", Katie Salidas' book blogspot:

http://myimmortalstories.blogspot.com/

Jumble Tales


message 3: by Nicolle (new)

Nicolle | 135 comments That is an interesting interview.
I seem quite similar to you academically it is quite wierd...I love maths and physics (I'm currently taking at Alevel) and also english, which I was advised not to do at Alevel as it didn't fit in with the other science type subjects, but I love it and didn't want to stop. Also my aim is to become a teacher! And I've always wanted to write a book though I doubt it will be as imaginative and addictive as yours, but for now I am just writing poems, well, I've written one so far.

Are there any more books on the way?


message 4: by Steve (new)

Steve Morris | 250 comments Mod
Hiya Nicolle,
Great to hear that you like Maths and Physics as they are becoming unpopular at A-level and university, neither hardly a "soft-option". Some university physics departments have had to close recently due to lack of numbers.

This is concerning when we consider the need to nurture maths and scientific talent in the UK. Instead people choose trendy easy subjects and still unsurprisingly can't find employment after graduating.
Stay with the sciences, especially if you enjoy them and have a flair for them!

It is also interesting that you like poetry. Many high-ability science and maths students I meet find the English GCSE poetry difficult. I did too!

But poetry is to be enjoyed...
I love the melancholy beauty of Thomas Hardy's poetry.

As regards books (and stories), fingers-crossed, there should be a brand new story in an anthology called "Taj Mahal Review" at Xmas.
I spoke to the editor of "JT" this week about the future and said that I would like to see how the book book goes before making a decision.
I would like to present a novel next of which I've got some really different ideas even down to the book covers, but after production,it takes so much legwork to promote them and it is a huge commitment with a lot of travelling to students studying for exams at the moment.
In these economic times, we should always value our day jobs highly! I wouldn't like to neglect any students.
But hopefully if JT takes off, the publisher will agree and the novel will follow!


message 5: by Nicolle (new)

Nicolle | 135 comments I am going to stick, and do mathematics at uni. My favourite poet is Carol Ann Duffy, she is AMAZING!!

I look forwards to any future work and try to get people reading Jumble Tales by sending everyone reccomendations!! And alot have put it one thier 'To Read' list.

It seems so hard to make it as an author nowadays as there are so many talented authors and so many genres and tastes! I think it is sensible for you debute books to be short stories as you explained before about our ever shortening free time.

I think it is commendible that you teach ill children, what kind of illnesses do they have (mental? Physical?) and is it not heart wrenching seeing ill children all the time?!


message 6: by Steve (new)

Steve Morris | 250 comments Mod
Hi Nicolle,
Wise Uni thoughts! Maths is a language of its own.

Thanks for all the support with the book. Much appreciated.

Yes, the students we teach are all long-term ill. They have all manner of illnesses and injuries but they all need to keep up-to-speed with their studies while they are away. Hospitals also now have their own teachng staff.

However it is concerning at the moment about the increase in serious mental illnesses amongst teenagers. Perhaps it is a reflection of the pressure that "the system" (and society in general) places on young people.

It is hard work being a teenager!


message 7: by Nicolle (new)

Nicolle | 135 comments Yes it is! I am glad we think more of educating the ill, I think it makes them feel like their lives aren't over and that they still have a future.


message 8: by Steve (new)

Steve Morris | 250 comments Mod
Most of them bounce back, and Alegbra is always a good distraction when you are plastered up!
Hopefully there won't be any fresh accidents in this ice.

Two more interviews about "Jumble Tales" done this week and some Press reviews to follow.
Fingers crossed....


message 9: by Steve (new)

Steve Morris | 250 comments Mod
"The Truth about Books" are always very honest and forthright in their opinions....

http://www.thetruthaboutbooks.com/boo...

"Think of it as the You’ve Been Framed or the Oops TV of books: a veritable jumble of entertaining fun shorts."


message 10: by Nicolle (new)

Nicolle | 135 comments This website sounds interesting...I'll have a look.


message 11: by Steve (new)

Steve Morris | 250 comments Mod
Well it is a completely fair review, but personally speaking I was chuffed with the cover and can't see much wrong with the editing!
And they call it "Jumble Tails"!


message 12: by Nicolle (new)

Nicolle | 135 comments That was a bit harsh! But they said you have improved from before which I agree with.


message 13: by Steve (new)

Steve Morris | 250 comments Mod
Thanks Nicolle.
And I'm not sure if ".....Think of it as the You’ve Been Framed or the Oops TV of books: a veritable jumble of entertaining fun shorts....." is a compliment or not!


message 14: by Nicolle (new)

Nicolle | 135 comments Me either...probably not if your aim is to be a serious writer. Your books have humerous elements though so I can see why they said it.


message 15: by Steve (last edited Dec 08, 2010 12:17PM) (new)

Steve Morris | 250 comments Mod
Well, three print magazines have confirmed reviews of "Jumble Tales". I shall post links as and when they materialise.

I was told today that one of my short stories was used in a school English lesson. What a compliment.
I was so taken aback, that I had to change the subject pronto.


message 16: by Steve (new)

Steve Morris | 250 comments Mod
A review of "Jumble Tales" by Marc Johnson.

http://marcjohnsonbooks.wordpress.com...


message 17: by Nicolle (new)

Nicolle | 135 comments Steve wrote: "Well, three print magazines have confirmed reviews of "Jumble Tales". I shall post links as and when they materialise.

I was told today that one of my short stories was used in a school English ..."


Wow, which story if you mind me asking?


message 18: by Steve (new)

Steve Morris | 250 comments Mod
Hi. I'm not exactly sure. To be honest, I think I turned crimson and changed the subject quickly when I heard. Students would be the most fierce of all critics anyway!


message 19: by Steve (new)

Steve Morris | 250 comments Mod
Jumble Tales included in Cheshire Life's January 2011 book page and an (edited) interview in Book Savvy newsletter December:
http://www.pneumasprings.co.uk/BookSa...


message 20: by Steve (last edited Jan 09, 2011 10:14AM) (new)

Steve Morris | 250 comments Mod
Jumble Tales is Book of the Month for January in Country & Border Life magazine.

http://www.publishedbestsellers.com/


message 21: by Nicolle (new)

Nicolle | 135 comments Yeah!


message 22: by Steve (new)

Steve Morris | 250 comments Mod
Thanks Nicolle! ....And I hope to get back onto the Can't stop reading forum as soon as students get started on all the science exams in about ten days time!


message 23: by Steve (last edited Jan 10, 2011 12:38AM) (new)

Steve Morris | 250 comments Mod
Nice words last night in the reviews section of The Shropshire Star newspaper. Despite only 3 stars and hinting that it is a book for "men of a certain age" they gave Jumble Tales a really nice review.
The Star has a wide circulation even beyond the Shropshire borders, where I picked up my copy.

http://www.pneumasprings.co.uk/Shrops...


message 24: by Steve (new)

Steve Morris | 250 comments Mod
A review of "Jumble Tales" will appear at

http://readforyourfuture.blogspot.com/

a book review site which is actively fighting childhood illiteracy in the USA via book reviews and donations
Thanks to Lora and Michelle for their help with this and for their sterling work encouraging literacy.


message 25: by Steve (new)

Steve Morris | 250 comments Mod
The well-regarded blog from Mandy the Bookworm, who is based in Australia is about to review Jumble Tales.


http://mandythebookworm.wordpress.com...


message 26: by Steve (new)

Steve Morris | 250 comments Mod
The review from Read for your Future is now live at:

http://readforyourfuture.blogspot.com...


message 27: by Steve (new)

Steve Morris | 250 comments Mod
A brand new review blogspot has just launched:

http://jodiesreviews.blogspot.com/

Jodie's reviews will be reviewing books, films and gadgets and has kicked off with my two paperbacks.

So many thanks, Jodie.


message 28: by Steve (new)

Steve Morris | 250 comments Mod
A great review of "In All Probability" on a site with a very worthy cause (fighting illiteracy in children) is today online at:

http://readforyourfuture.blogspot.com...

Thank you again to Mechelle and Lora for all their help.


message 29: by Steve (new)

Steve Morris | 250 comments Mod
Thank you to Mandy de Jeger for her great review of Jumble Tales today on Mandythebookworm's book review blog.

http://mandythebookworm.wordpress.com...


message 30: by Steve (new)

Steve Morris | 250 comments Mod
Jumble Tales will shortly be reviewed by "The Short Review". Yesterday I completed an interview with them about the book.

This is a link to the review they wrote of Probability in 2009:
http://www.theshortreview.com/reviews...


message 31: by Steve (new)

Steve Morris | 250 comments Mod
Great review of "Jumble Tales" out today in "The Short Review." The best yet.

http://www.theshortreview.com/reviews...


message 32: by Steve (new)

Steve Morris | 250 comments Mod
Thank you to Kate Rosengarten who let me guest on her Blog. Kate is a professional proofreader amongst other learned things.

http://www.kateproof.co.uk/blog/20071...


message 33: by Richard (new)

Richard | 25 comments Well, I decided to forget about some of the other books I was planning to read first and took the plunge. I have now read the first installment of In All Probability. I think I will build the author's suspense by delaying the review until I've read a bit further, but so far it tastes moreish--er, I mean Morris.


message 34: by Nicolle (new)

Nicolle | 135 comments HAHa...


message 35: by Steve (new)

Steve Morris | 250 comments Mod
Excellent, Richard. Many thanks. Tasting my own medicine! I reserve the right to withdraw the thanks if you shred it, though..

To a fellow mathematician, Nicolle, "Welcome back!"


message 36: by Richard (last edited Oct 15, 2011 03:57AM) (new)

Richard | 25 comments Steve,
Re: Dead-Eye. I liked this first story, which for me, had echoes of the Biblical David and Goliath, although the resemblance only goes so far. Were you thinking of this when you wrote it, or am I reading too much into it?
Also, could you explain the "Lord Haw-Haw" reference for your non-UK groupies please?


message 37: by Steve (new)

Steve Morris | 250 comments Mod
Hello Richard,
Greetings from an Autumnal UK. Mild and sunny today but getting cooler at night. In two weeks we change our clocks by one hour to save daylight.

Lord Haw-Haw, was a name given to several English (Nazi sympathising) radio propagandists who during the second world war, defected to Germany to taunt and demoralise the allied troops with chilling radio announcements. My grandfather worked mining coal deep in pits on the night shift during the war years. A death trap if they were being bombed from above. Haw Haw often used to name the pit as on "the bombing list for that night" to be heard by the rest of the family at home in blackouts. A man called William Joyce was caught and hung for treason at Nuremburg. There are some archived recordings somewhere. Very chiling!


message 38: by Richard (new)

Richard | 25 comments And hence a way to make the villain all the more sinister. My parents are from the Netherlands and grew up during WWII, so I heard lots of these wartime anecdotes too. It's interesting how much of an impact one's personal life and family history can have on one's writing.


message 39: by Steve (new)

Steve Morris | 250 comments Mod
Absolutely. I'm always fascinated (in a respectful and humble way) of the tales from people who lived through the War. Their bravery is incredible. I'm currently working with a family, who's 84 year old grandfather as a young recruit was one of the first to liberate one of the Nazi concentration camps. I could listen to him all day. He is the real teacher for us all.


message 40: by Richard (new)

Richard | 25 comments A bit off topic, but here goes. The library at my workplace had a book giveaway today, and as I find free books almost impossible to resist (all right, scratch "almost"), I found myself looking through the offerings. I picked up an H.G. Wells novel I'd never heard of:Kipps (mine's a different edition). Apparently it's not SF but social satire. I was intrigued because there's some pretty savage social satire in the works I have read. Wells is one of your literary heroes, Steve, so I wondered if you (or any other member of the group) had any thoughts about this one.


message 41: by Steve (new)

Steve Morris | 250 comments Mod
Good morning Richard. Yes, I've read Kipps. There was a film made of it too (in black and white). I prefer his SF, as you know but Kipps is a light social novel, possibly set in Edwardian England about the ambitions and love of a shop assistant. H.G. Wells was very prolific and I'd like to own a complete set of his work.


message 42: by Steve (new)

Steve Morris | 250 comments Mod
A new short story has won an award:

http://tajmahalreview.com/poetryaward...

I'm honoured to be part of this because I've been reading Taj Mahal Review for quite some time and it includes work from all areas of the globe. Twice a year, June and December, it is always a good read for me to relax with over the vacation period.


message 43: by Nicolle (new)

Nicolle | 135 comments Steve wrote: "A new short story has won an award:

http://tajmahalreview.com/poetryaward...

I'm honoured to be part of this because I've been reading Taj Mahal Review for quite some time and it includes work f..."

Congrats Steve! It says more works to come...any time soon?

Steve wrote: "Excellent, Richard. Many thanks. Tasting my own medicine! I reserve the right to withdraw the thanks if you shred it, though..

To a fellow mathematician, Nicolle, "Welcome back!""


Thankyou!! I applied to do maths at uni next year and have been offered 3 conditional places so far:
Leeds (AAB), Salford (ABB), Manchester Met (BBC) and got an interview for Manchester Main!! I want to go to Manchester Main or Leeds most of all but the grades they want are so high!
Currently revising for Jan exams including Decision 1 in maths.


message 44: by Steve (new)

Steve Morris | 250 comments Mod
Great to hear that you will go on to study maths. Certainly not a soft-option trendy degree to do and I'm sure you'll do well because of your obvious passion for it.

With all these modular exams at A-level, the pressure is on you all year round.


message 45: by Nicolle (new)

Nicolle | 135 comments I know, it is pretty hard to be honest. People who say exams are getting easier and totally wrong, personally I think it is just that teaching has improved, but exams are still hard and it is shown by the differentiation in the grades.

Hope all your students are doing Ok.


message 46: by Steve (new)

Steve Morris | 250 comments Mod
It has been a while scince there have been any book reviews but here is one today from the Great Minds Think Aloud literary community. Thank you to Kitty for all her help with this.

http://www.greatmindsthinkaloud.probo...


message 47: by Steve (new)

Steve Morris | 250 comments Mod
Interviews up today at GMTA blog:
http://greatmindsthinkaloud.blogspot....

and

Writing Commando:
http://leeanngraffvinson.blogspot.co....

Thank you to Kitty and Lee-Ann respectively for their help and support.


message 48: by Steve (new)

Steve Morris | 250 comments Mod
Late review of Jumble Tales at Read2Review.

http://read2review.com/events-reading...

Thanks to Dan Wright for his review!

We won't mention the other one....


message 49: by Nicolle (new)

Nicolle | 135 comments Steve wrote: "Interviews up today at GMTA blog:
http://greatmindsthinkaloud.blogspot....

and

Writing Commando:
http://leeanngraffvinson.blogspot.co....

Thank ..."



Great interview, how does it work out? Do you talk on the phone or just email answers to all the questions?

Didn't know you were a fellow country dweller, thought you lived in Manchester?!?
I can't wait to move out of my semi-countryside town into a full fledged country scene. Possibly towards Yorkshire or maybe even Hertfordshire if I'm feeling brave!


message 50: by Steve (new)

Steve Morris | 250 comments Mod
Well, these are usually by phone or email. For the regional magazines last time I met the reporters. I love to watch people's lightning shorthand, another disappearing skill alas!

Yes, I much prefer the countryside too. I like the friendliness of Manchester and I've worked in London too but I always yearn for the open country and pay the price of having to drive a lot.
It has its drawbacks. I have been without a phone line since last Thursday and it won't be repaired until Saturday. I can get one bar on the mobile phone if I tramp around the sheep field!

Yorkshire is nice too.


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