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General Fuckery > Being a grown up means ______

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message 1: by Sarah (new)

Sarah | 13815 comments ...dragging yourself to the dentist (or doctor) with no incentives other than the knowledge that you're supposed to. I miss being told I'd get a new Breyer horse or a book if I got through the appointment.


message 2: by Jim (new)

Jim | 6485 comments ...when you are looking around for someone else to pay the bills all you have to do is look in the mirror.


message 3: by Gatorman (new)

Gatorman ...not quitting a job just because you don't like it when you have bills to pay and nothing else lined up to replace it.


message 4: by Kevin (new)

Kevin  (ksprink) | 11469 comments ...being able to eat a whole box of fudge-sickles all by yourself because you bought em


message 5: by Brittomart (new)

Brittomart Kevin wins.


message 6: by Gatorman (new)

Gatorman Kevin "El Liso Grande" wrote: "...being able to eat a whole box of fudge-sickles all by yourself because you bought em"

That fact doesn't seem to stop my stepson from eating everything he doesn't buy.


message 7: by Sarah (new)

Sarah | 13815 comments There was a brief moment in college when I thought being a grownup meant getting to eat sugary cereal whenever I wanted, if I wanted. Then I realized I actually didn't want to, which was its own victory and its own disappointment.


message 8: by Kevin (new)

Kevin  (ksprink) | 11469 comments don't be a hater barb. i'll buy you your own box :)


message 9: by Jaimie (new)

Jaimie (jez476) | 664 comments ...having your own Corningware. Or at least that's how I felt in September when I found two pieces with their lids at a thrift store. I felt like a real grown-up woman. :-)


message 10: by Phoenix (new)

Phoenix (phoenixapb) | 1619 comments ...being responisble for everything and everyone in your household. They all rely on you, look up to you, and expect you to have all the answers...gulp...YIKES!Can I go back to being a kid now?...aw nevermind...it was the same way for me then too...damn!


message 11: by Kevin (last edited Nov 08, 2010 12:28PM) (new)

Kevin  (ksprink) | 11469 comments ....regularly knowing people who die


message 12: by Dr. Detroit (new)

Dr. Detroit | 6033 comments ...realizing you morphed into your dad the moment your first child was born.


message 13: by Joanne (new)

Joanne (bonfiggi) Taking responsibility for your actions. And not saying "My addict made me." "I'm bi-polar." "My childhood was bad." etc.


message 14: by RandomAnthony (new)

RandomAnthony | 14536 comments I think there are a lot of fun things about being a grown up. I think we talked about some of this in a high school thread once...the idea that anyone who says to high school kids "these are the best years of your life" is fucking stupid. I HATED fucking high school. And even if I liked it, well, there are plenty of opportunities to be happy later in life, too. So yes, adulthood is a lot of responsibility. But it's also the self-assured feeling of knowing who you are, and liking who you are, hopefully, and I haven't really found that until the last couple of years.


message 15: by Jackie "the Librarian" (last edited Nov 08, 2010 02:46PM) (new)

Jackie "the Librarian" | 8993 comments I wasn't that crazy about high school, either, RA, but junior high was even worse.

For me, being a grown up means taking responsibility for oneself, knowing that you are responsible for one's actions, and yes, self acceptance.


message 16: by Suefly (new)

Suefly | 620 comments Paying your own way, saying I'm sorry and not only meaning it, but knowing it does not always salvage the situation, taking care of your aged parents


message 17: by Lobstergirl, el principe (new)

Lobstergirl | 24388 comments Mod
Being responsible, and reliable. Being where you say you're going to be, calling someone when you told them you'd call them. Having a budget and sticking to it. Loving the taste of strong coffee. Trying to be a good, well-informed citizen. Doing laundry even when you don't feel like it. Obeying the traffic laws. Learning the traffic laws, including that one about pedestrians in the crosswalk. Observing the golden rule.


message 18: by Stacia (the 2010 club) (last edited Nov 08, 2010 03:14PM) (new)

Stacia (the 2010 club) (stacia_r) ...being able to stay out at late as you want and realizing that you're trying to make it home before dark.


message 19: by Carol (new)

Carol | 1679 comments ...keeping your word. It is freedom. Choose where you want to live; choose who/what you surround yourself with; choose what to do for money. Lots of choices.


message 20: by Jan (new)

Jan | 241 comments ....not having anyone telling you what to do and how to think. That is a clear definition of freedom.


message 21: by Dr. Detroit (new)

Dr. Detroit | 6033 comments Hate to go against the flow RA and Jackie (well, not really) but whoever says your high-school years are the best years of your life is not only telling the truth, but should be screaming it from atop a mountain somewhere.

The unholy triumvirate of sex, drugs, and rock and roll combined with a paucity of responsibilities sure sounds like heaven to me. I had a blast and would warp back to 1976 in a fat friggin' second if I could.


message 22: by Jaimie (new)

Jaimie (jez476) | 664 comments ...not being able to enjoy the good parts about unemployment, i.e. not having to get up to an alarm, I can stay in my pj's for an long as I want, because you're worried about your financial future. :-(


message 23: by Sarah (new)

Sarah | 13815 comments I apologize for the mostly downer thread. I was having trouble convincing myself to go to the dentist. It wasn't so bad. No cavities.


message 24: by Jan (new)

Jan | 241 comments Lucky you. I have one and have to go back for a drilling and a filling. (My Shuffle is fully charged.)


Jackie "the Librarian" | 8993 comments Clark wrote: "Hate to go against the flow RA and Jackie (well, not really) but whoever says your high-school years are the best years of your life is not only telling the truth, but should be screaming it from atop a mountain somewhere.

The unholy triumvirate of sex, drugs, and rock and roll combined with a paucity of responsibilities sure sounds like heaven to me. I had a blast and would warp back to 1976 in a fat friggin' second if I could..."


Now see, Clark, I didn't exactly HAVE "sex, drugs, and rock and roll" during my high school years. I had Friday nights at home, band practice, and youth group.


message 26: by Sarah (new)

Sarah | 13815 comments College was way better for me. Not that high school was bad, just that I was a little more comfortable in my own skin in college.


message 27: by Jaimie (new)

Jaimie (jez476) | 664 comments Sarah Pi wrote: "I apologize for the mostly downer thread. I was having trouble convincing myself to go to the dentist. It wasn't so bad. No cavities."

Actually, I'm quite enjoying this thread. It's the shared experience of being an ad--, ad--, adult.


message 28: by Jaimie (new)

Jaimie (jez476) | 664 comments I had moments in high school that were great and still have some great, great friends from it. Although, I only communicate with them on FB. I think high school is horrible in peoples minds because we're all so hormonal during those years that everything is magnified.


message 29: by Dr. Detroit (last edited Nov 10, 2010 05:11AM) (new)

Dr. Detroit | 6033 comments King Dinösaur wrote: "If your high school years are your best, why bother to go on living?

The only people I know who would consider high school the best years of their lives are living like they still think they are b..."



Good point, KD. Perhaps I should amend that to say "some" of the best years of your life. Despite my constant rants about my daughters (who have just had an 11th Circle of Hell named in their honor by the Vatican), I wouldn't trade my life now for another kick at the cat.

Joe Cool? Hardly... I just never bought into all of the posturing, head games, staking out territory, and attempts at imposing some sort of teenage caste system by my classmates. Can't understand why so many kids do. Everyone's different I guess.

Which begs the question: if high school was so great, why have I never attended one of my class reunions?


message 30: by Jaimie (new)

Jaimie (jez476) | 664 comments Because high school reunions are for people to show off how great their lives are now, if they are great. It's just a continuation of the high school games.

The caste system and cliques in my high school was weird. It seemed like the more unique you were the more popular you were. The drama club was the largest club in the school, we had at least 100 members. We could even letter in drama (and I did). We had jocks from the football and wrestling teams and cheerleaders in the drama club. The more socially mistfit of us took the stagecraft class and were doing the behind the scenes stuff for our production. I did both that and the acting too but hung around with all the stagecraft people. I've always wanted to write a book about all that but I could never get a good story going.


message 31: by Joanne (new)

Joanne (bonfiggi) I never went to any high school reunions, but in June of this year I went to my 50th. A guy that had a crush on me in HS was dressed in a Hawaiian shirt covered in scantily clad ladies. He kept winking at me. Fui. The food was dull, and the entertainment was an Elvis impersonator. They opened with a prayer that mentioned Jesus about 20 times, and all the groups that clung together in HS were still clinging. I don't care how long I live, I will never go to another. I'm a grown-up damn it.


message 32: by Heather (last edited Nov 12, 2010 10:56AM) (new)

Heather Lapinsky | 9 comments To me, being a grown up has given me the ability to actually listen to people when they talk. To hear their advice and recognize that they mean well, even if the words they say are stupid. I wasn't able to do that as a know-it-all-teenager.

As for the reunion thing- I skipped my 5-year, 10-year, and 15-year reunions. My husband and I decided to give our 20-year a try this coming summer, though. We've been together since I was 12, and know all the same school people, but he's in the Army and we've always been very far from home. I'm starting to think deciding to go is a mistake!


message 33: by CoolAmadeus (new)

CoolAmadeus (madnessvp) | 2 comments ...when you start talking in numbers.


message 34: by smetchie (new)

smetchie | 4034 comments I've wanted to post in this thread since it started but I just can't. I don't think I identify as an adult.


message 35: by RandomAnthony (new)

RandomAnthony | 14536 comments If your high school years are your best, why bother to go on living?

The only people I know who would consider high school the best years of their lives are living like they still think they are back there...pathetic.


Yes, this was what I was trying to say. I mean, even if you have a great high school experience, if you're a seventeen year old, and you hear an older person say this, what does that mean of the future, you know?

My oldest son, now in sixth grade, is way different than I was then, in a good way, I think. He wants to get involved in everything...sports, drama, etc. I'm glad he does...he loves school. Except for his math teacher, who's a bitch.


message 36: by Dr. Detroit (new)

Dr. Detroit | 6033 comments RandomAnthony wrote: "If your high school years are your best, why bother to go on living?

The only people I know who would consider high school the best years of their lives are living like they still think they are b..."


My 13-year-old too, too RA.


message 37: by Sarah (new)

Sarah | 13815 comments smetchie wrote: "I've wanted to post in this thread since it started but I just can't. I don't think I identify as an adult."

I mostly do when I'm paying bills or taking myself to the dentist.


message 38: by Michele (new)

Michele bookloverforever (lovebooks14) | 1970 comments admitting YOU made the mistake or did the wrong thing.


message 39: by Jim (new)

Jim | 6485 comments Welcome to TC Michele. Thanks for jumping in.


message 40: by Michele (new)

Michele bookloverforever (lovebooks14) | 1970 comments being able to spend ALL your discretionary income on books..picking out your own books to boot with no one looking over your shoulder saying "do you really want to spend money on THAT?"


message 41: by Sarah (new)

Sarah | 13815 comments I was thinking about that with regards to chocolate bars the other day.

I remember crossing Broadway in my coolest t-shirt (it had a leopard on it, from the Bronx Zoo) when I was ten years old and going into the convenience/party store for some stickers and looking at the candy bars and thinking "someday I'll be able to buy a Snickers whenever I want." I think I have bought about three in my entire life since then.


message 42: by Sally, la reina (new)

Sally (mrsnolte) | 17347 comments Mod
RandomAnthony wrote: "I'm glad he does...he loves school. Except for his math teacher, who's a bitch. "

I wonder if any of my students' parents think I'm a bitch.


message 43: by Michele (new)

Michele bookloverforever (lovebooks14) | 1970 comments I was in a bookstore the other day (I know--outmoded way to buy books these days), a little boy about 6 wanted 2 books but mom said only one..she left and I told him to cheer up when he grew up he could buy as many books as he could afford.


message 44: by Lobstergirl, el principe (new)

Lobstergirl | 24388 comments Mod
Flossing.


message 45: by Michele (new)

Michele bookloverforever (lovebooks14) | 1970 comments Lobstergirl wrote: "Flossing."

flossing without someone asking you if you did it.


message 46: by Michele (new)

Michele bookloverforever (lovebooks14) | 1970 comments I can remember the first time I acted as an adult. My then husband was in the hospital in Alabama with a serious case of septicemia. I was in a new town, did not know anyone as I had just moved there 1 wk previously...I went to pour out my woes into my mom's or dad's ears...and stopped. Because what could they do? they were in NH both of them worked full time and could not come down and keep me company. So, I didn't call them because they would only be able to worry long distance. That's the day I grew up.


message 47: by Jan (new)

Jan | 241 comments In what context are you using this? Do you mean not having someone telling you that you have to floss or having to floss to save whatever teeth you have left?


message 48: by janine (new)

janine | 7715 comments i floss, but i don't identify as an adult.


message 49: by Kristina (new)

Kristina | 136 comments I think the first time I really felt like an adult was when we got a new washer and dryer. I was ridiculously excited.


message 50: by JennyGrace (new)

JennyGrace  M. Dealing with annoyingly bratty 14-year-olds, like me


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