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Amazon's Top SF&F Novels of 2010

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message 1: by Sean (new)

Sean O'Hara (seanohara) | 2365 comments It's November, which means its time for stores to start downsizing their Christmas displays to make room for Easter junk, and for people to start publishing their Top 10 of '10 lists. Here's Amazon's:

1.The Golden Age by Michal Ajvaz (Dalkey Archive Press)
2.How to Live Safely in a Science Fictional Universe by Charles Yu (Atlantic Books) [SF Signal's review]
3.Redemption in Indigo by Karen Lord (Small Beer Press)
4.The Half-Made World by Felix Gilman (Tor Books)
5.The Hundred Thousand Kingdoms by N.K. Jemisin (Orbit) [SF Signal's review]
6.The Orange Eats Creeps by Grace Krilanovich (Two Dollar Radio)
7.The Dream of Perpetual Motion by Dexter Palmer (Picador) [SF Signal's review]
8.Who Fears Death by Nnedi Okorafor (DAW)
9.The Fixed Stars: Thirty-Seven Emblems for the Perilous Season by Brian Conn (Fiction Collective 2)
10.Kill the Dead by Richard Kadrey (Eos)

Jeff VanderMeer, who compiled the list for Amazon, has his thoughts behind it here and here. There was also a thread on io9 where people complained about how they've never heard of any of these books.


message 2: by Tashfeen (new)

Tashfeen (tbhimdi) | 28 comments Lets see, I recognize one author and zero books, but then again, that isn't really surprising to me.


message 3: by dudeslife (new)

dudeslife | 9 comments The world seems to have lost sight of what a good Fantasy is..


message 4: by Dan (new)

Dan (daniel-san) | 101 comments Most of these seem like interesting and fun reads, and I'm glad it's not just another rehash of what the mainstream crowds have been reading. The one at the top, The Golden Age, sounds like one I could get into. I like weird, but thought-provoking stories, and this one sounds like it has plenty of both to go around.

I'd like to hear what other S&L readers think about the books in this list.


message 5: by [deleted user] (new)

Wow, that's an obscure list. Half of them aren't even in my regional library systems. Many aren't widely read here on GR either, so it's difficult to get any feel for why they were selected.


message 6: by Janny (new)

Janny (jannywurts) | 44 comments Sean wrote: "It's November, which means its time for stores to start downsizing their Christmas displays to make room for Easter junk, and for people to start publishing their Top 10 of '10 lists. Here's Amazon..."

Is this list a joke?
Very disappointing choices, in some ways - IMHO.


message 7: by Sean (new)

Sean O'Hara (seanohara) | 2365 comments VanderMeer, who compiled the list for Amazon, has a followup on his blog comparing his selections to the ones on Amazon.co.uk, which are pretty much a best-seller list. He also addresses critics like those in this thread:

"When I see a book title or author I don’t recognize on a year’s best list, my immediate reaction isn’t usually “WTF”, but instead, 'Excellent! A chance to find some new, shiny thing that I might love.'"


message 8: by Al (new)

Al | 159 comments Sean wrote: 'He also addresses critics like those in this thread: "When I see a book title or author I don’t recognize on a year’s best list, my immediate reaction isn’t usually “WTF”, but instead, 'Excellent! A chance to find some new, shiny thing that I might love.'"

Clearly VanderMeer was trying to bring the new and noteworthy to our attention. Commendable. Unfortunately, I find it hard to believe that all ten of these books are better than, say, the latest Wm Gibson or Banks or other more recognized authors. Since I usually try and figure out whether I'd like the unknowns on top 10 lists by comparing them to a few knowns his approach backfired.


message 9: by Stan (last edited Nov 10, 2010 02:33PM) (new)

Stan Slaughter | 359 comments New and noteworthy does not automatically imply Top SF&F Novel.

It just means "New and noteworthy"

P.S.

Just did a Google. #1 in the list was written in 2001, not 2010. It was just translated to English this year.

Also got a chuckle when one reviewer said

"..This book is a kind of travelogue of an island in the Atlantic peopled by islanders who conform to no known form of Eastern or Western civilizations. They seem to sit around all day and do nothing, except stare at different shapes and/or colors. They draw no distinction between reality (as we define it) and its representation, so that a mirror image of an object is as substantial as the object itself. Their religion consists of conferring visually and mentally with a variety of stains that are on the walls of their houses and official building..."

It sounds like the author is describing your average World of WarCraft/MMPOG gamer :)


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