Sweeping Sagas discussion

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More books set in Australia?

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message 1: by Misfit (new)

Misfit | 478 comments Mod
I just found this Listmania on Amazon and thought it might be of interest,

http://www.amazon.com/Australia-histo...


message 2: by [deleted user] (new)

I'm liking the looks of English Passengers: A Novel.


message 3: by Misfit (new)

Misfit | 478 comments Mod
Michele wrote: "I'm liking the looks of English Passengers: A Novel."

I haven't looked at it that closely yet. Too busy reading today.


message 4: by Jill (new)

Jill Good morning. It's 8.00am Sunday here. What's the time difference with you guys?

That list looks great Misfit. It's amazing going over it how many 'Australian' novels I've read over the years. I really thought I hadn't read that many. Although I know in more recent years I haven't.


message 5: by Misfit (new)

Misfit | 478 comments Mod
Hi Jill, it's just going on 3PM here, but Daylight Savings time ends tonight (finally) and thus tomorrow it would be 2 PM.


message 6: by Marg (new)

Marg (margreads) | 128 comments Of those I have read Thorn Birds, The Secret River and Everyman's Rules for Scientific Thinking which was actually quite good. I tried to read Carpentaria but really, really struggled with it.

At one point I did start the Bryce Courtney book but didn't get very far.

Another suggestion might be All the Rivers Run by Nancy Cato, which is about the paddle steamers on the Murray River.

There is a series that I remember reading in my teens that I have been trying to think of that I loved at the time. I am thinking the author was Adam Kennedy but the synopsis on the books don't match up, so I will keep on thinking.


message 7: by [deleted user] (new)

So I picked up a library copy of English Passengers by Matthew Kneale (had no idea this one was a Booker finalist). The most common cover is this:



But I like the cover on mine much better (in fact, I luvs it):




message 8: by Misfit (new)

Misfit | 478 comments Mod
That cover makes me seasick


message 9: by Marg (new)

Marg (margreads) | 128 comments I know what you mean Misfit, but it is a much better cover than the first one! What year was it a Booker finalist?


message 10: by [deleted user] (new)

In 2000. That same year it won the Whitbread Book Award and the Miles Franklin Award.

Evidently, it gives Susan a run for her money with 20 different narrators, LOL.

I want to frame the cover and hang it up.


message 11: by Marg (new)

Marg (margreads) | 128 comments Well there you go. I didn't know it won the Miles Franklin, or rather I have it written down on a list somewhere at home but it didn't ring any bells in my poor brain!

Hmm, I am not 100% sure about books with numerous narrators. They have to be done really well or it annoys me.


message 12: by Misfit (new)

Misfit | 478 comments Mod
Marg wrote: "Well there you go. I didn't know it won the Miles Franklin, or rather I have it written down on a list somewhere at home but it didn't ring any bells in my poor brain!

Hmm, I am not 100% sure ab..."


I agree, Susan Howatch is one of the few who really master it.


message 13: by Marg (new)

Marg (margreads) | 128 comments Haven't read Susan Howatch yet.


message 14: by Misfit (new)

Misfit | 478 comments Mod
Marg wrote: "Haven't read Susan Howatch yet."

Oh, she's awesome, especially those three that parallel the Plantagenets. She'll break her books down into say five sections and each one is a different person's POV. You really get into their heads.

Penmarric by Susan Howatch Cashelmara by Susan Howatch Wheel of Fortune by Susan Howatch

They can be read in any order, the only relationship is the timeline of the Plantagenet parallels.


message 15: by Marg (new)

Marg (margreads) | 128 comments I intend to read her at some point or another. Too many books!


message 16: by [deleted user] (new)

Misfit wrote: "Marg wrote: "Haven't read Susan Howatch yet."

Oh, she's awesome, especially those three that parallel the Plantagenets. She'll break her books down into say five sections and each one is a diffe..."


Is there any particular order in which they should be read?


message 17: by Misfit (new)

Misfit | 478 comments Mod
Marg wrote: "I intend to read her at some point or another. Too many books!"

I know, and all it takes is a new discovery to set me on a whole new path. Which is why I avoid challenges.


message 18: by Misfit (new)

Misfit | 478 comments Mod
Is there any particular order in which they should be read?

The chronological order as far as the Plantagenet parallels are Penmarric, Cashelmara and then Wheel of Fortune. Again, no relation otherwise. Penmarric is set in Cornwell. Cashelmara Ireland (for the most part). Wheel is set in Wales.

Oh, but I wish she had written one more and done the Wars of the Roses. Sigh...


message 19: by Misfit (new)

Misfit | 478 comments Mod
Michele, don't forget I did nab you a copy of Wheel so don't go a-buying it.


message 20: by [deleted user] (new)

Misfit wrote: "Michele, don't forget I did nab you a copy of Wheel so don't go a-buying it."

LOL - believe me, I won't forget that. But I'm pushing Penmarric up on the list. After English Passengers. And The Forever Queen. And a new book on the lost colony of Roanoke I just got. Sheesh.


message 21: by Misfit (new)

Misfit | 478 comments Mod
I know, it never stops. I was tempted to try Forever Queen, but I've already read the original.

Penmarric, oh what Howatch does with Henry and Eleanor. Richard and John. Arthur's death. Oh my.

Grrr, the copy I had from the lib was covered in crib notes telling me who was who. Grrr.


message 22: by Carey (new)

Carey (thetometraveller) | 109 comments Michele wrote: "So I picked up a library copy of English Passengers by Matthew Kneale (had no idea this one was a Booker finalist). The most common cover is this:



But I like the cover on mine much better (in f..."


I have this! In the cover you like!


message 23: by [deleted user] (new)

Carey wrote: "Michele wrote: "So I picked up a library copy of English Passengers by Matthew Kneale (had no idea this one was a Booker finalist). The most common cover is this:


Have you read it???


But I like the cover on mi..."



message 24: by Carey (new)

Carey (thetometraveller) | 109 comments Nope, haven't read it. It's on the shelf by my bed though, must mean I wanted to get to it...


message 25: by [deleted user] (new)

I'm starting it today, Carey, lol.


message 26: by Carey (new)

Carey (thetometraveller) | 109 comments You are so funny...I am reading Impartial Witness as fast as I can...determined to be done by tomorrow!


message 27: by Marg (new)

Marg (margreads) | 128 comments I just picked up English Passengers. It doesn't have the cool cover though.


message 28: by [deleted user] (new)

Marg wrote: "I just picked up English Passengers. It doesn't have the cool cover though."

Oh goody! I'm about 50 pages in and am surprised at how smartly this is written and that is has this much humor.


message 29: by Carey (new)

Carey (thetometraveller) | 109 comments You are making me want to join in and I have no idea how I'm going to manage it. Cut out sleep, maybe.


message 30: by Lori (new)

Lori Baldi Misfit wrote: "I know, it never stops. I was tempted to try Forever Queen, but I've already read the original.

Penmarric, oh what Howatch does with Henry and Eleanor. Richard and John. Arthur's death. Oh my.
..."


Susan Howatch is just about my favorite of all! The first that I read is Cashelmara followed by Penmarric. My history wasn't very good about the Plantagenet family at the time but the stories were incredibly good at the time. I don't want anyone to be put off of the stories because their history isn't up to par! Howatch's style is the best and I try so hard to find someone who can keep up but it's impossible. I've read everything she's written and it is all beautiful. What does everyone think of the Church of England series?


message 31: by Misfit (new)

Misfit | 478 comments Mod
Hi Lori, you know I haven't read that series. I think it parallels something else, but I can't recall what. The Ceasars or something?


message 32: by [deleted user] (new)

Misfit wrote: "Hi Lori, you know I haven't read that series. I think it parallels something else, but I can't recall what. The Ceasars or something?"

I think you're speaking of the Starbridge Series. Here's the wik description:

This series of six books sets out to describe the history of the Church of England through the twentieth century. Each of the six books is self-contained, and each is narrated by a different character. However, the main protagonist of each book also appears in the other books, allowing the author to present the same incidents from different viewpoints.

The action of all six books centers around the fictional Anglican diocese of Starbridge, which is supposedly in the west of England, and also features the Fordite monks, a fictional Anglican monastic order. The cathedral and ecclesiastical hierarchy at Starbridge are based on the real-life Salisbury.

The first three books of the series (Glittering Images, Glamorous Powers, Ultimate Prizes) begin in the 1930s, and continue through the World War II. The second three (Scandalous Risks, Mystical Paths, Absolute Truths) take place in the 1960s.

Glittering Images is narrated by the Reverend Dr. Charles Ashworth, a Cambridge academic who undergoes something of a spiritual and nervous breakdown after being sent by the Archbishop of Canterbury to secretly investigate possible sexual transgressions in the household of the Bishop of Starbridge. Ashworth is helped to recover, and to realize the source of his problems, by Father Jonathan Darrow, the widowed abbot of Grantchester Abbey of the Fordite Monks.

Glamorous Powers follows the story of Jonathan Darrow himself as he leaves the Fordite Order at age sixty following a powerful vision. He then must deal with his adult children's problems, address the question of a new intimate relationship, and search for a new ministry. His particular crisis surrounds the use and misuse of his charismatic powers of healing, and his unsettling mystical visions, or "showings".

Ultimate Prizes takes place during World War II. It is narrated by Neville Aysgarth, a young and ambitious Archdeacon of Starbridge from a working class background in the north of England. After being widowed and remarried, he too undergoes something of a breakdown but is rescued by Jonathan Darrow.

Scandalous Risks follows Aysgarth to a Canonry of Westminster Abbey and back to Starbridge, where he becomes Dean of the Cathedral and Ashworth becomes Bishop. It is narrated by Venetia Flaxton, a young aristocrat who risks great scandal by beginning a relationship with the married Aysgarth, her father's best friend.

Mystical Paths follows Nicholas Darrow, son of Jonathan, as he narrowly avoids going off the rails prior to his ordination while investigating the mysterious disappearance of Christian Aysgarth, eldest son of the Dean Aysgarth.

Absolute Truths comes full circle and is narrated by a much more elderly but still troubled Charles Ashworth, thirty one years after we first encounter him in the first of the books.


message 33: by Marg (new)

Marg (margreads) | 128 comments I think I am going to start reading Walkabout (the next Outback book) over the weekend.


message 34: by [deleted user] (new)

Marg wrote: "I think I am going to start reading Walkabout (the next Outback book) over the weekend."

Okey doke, Marg....I've got two more to finish and I'll probably start it on Monday or so!


message 35: by Carey (new)

Carey (thetometraveller) | 109 comments Just started Walkabout today, so far I like it better than the first two.

I hesitate to add this series...but does anyone else have them? The Exiles (The Australians, Vol. 1) by William Stuart Long

There are twelve in The Australians series and the author, William Stuart Long, is a pseudonym for Vivian Stuart. She was a very proflific British writer under various names.


message 36: by [deleted user] (new)

Carey wrote: "Just started Walkabout today, so far I like it better than the first two.

I hesitate to add this series...but does anyone else have them?The Exiles (The Australians, Vol. 1) by William Stuart Long

There are twelve in T..."


dang you....no I don't have them, but now I'll be getting them. I'll start Walkabout tomorrow!


message 37: by Marg (new)

Marg (margreads) | 128 comments Carey wrote: "Just started Walkabout today, so far I like it better than the first two.

I hesitate to add this series...but does anyone else have them?The Exiles (The Australians, Vol. 1) by William Stuart Long

There are twelve in T..."


I liked the first part of Walkabout more too. A bit into part 2 now and I am a bit afraid that our characters are about to be put through the wringer emotionally in more ways than one.


message 38: by Carey (new)

Carey (thetometraveller) | 109 comments Michele, did you ever finish English Passengers?

I picked up a copy of The Given Day by Dennis Lehane this afternoon, have you read that one? I know you like his books, I've never read one.


message 39: by [deleted user] (new)

Carey wrote: "Michele, did you ever finish English Passengers?

I picked up a copy of The Given Day by Dennis Lehane this afternoon, have you read that one? I know you like his books, I've never read one."


I didn't, Carey....had to return it to the library, but figured I'd get it again at some point and finish it. It wasn't bad, I just got distracted with some other buddy reads at the time.

I do have a copy of The Given Day....haven't read it but would love to read it with you! I love, love, love his Kenzie/Geranno series to death and I'm just getting ready to start the latest new release of that series, Moonlight Mile. I'm excited for The Given Day since it's more HF and a stand alone!


message 40: by Carey (new)

Carey (thetometraveller) | 109 comments I sat on the jumpseat the other day with a flight attendant who raved about The Given Day. He's from Boston and said it was fantastic to learn the history of the area where ge grew up. He talked me into it! And then I found a copy today for 99 cents


message 41: by Carey (new)

Carey (thetometraveller) | 109 comments Can I bring the Maisie books with me at the end of the month? Or I'll be happy to send them if you want them sooner!


message 42: by [deleted user] (new)

Carey wrote: "Can I bring the Maisie books with me at the end of the month? Or I'll be happy to send them if you want them sooner!"

Oh don't waste postage....wait till end of month!


message 43: by [deleted user] (new)

Okay, Marg & Carey, in an unfortunate twist of events, it turns out that Walkabout is the only book of the series I do NOT have. So read on valiantly and I will find a copy and catch up later....


message 44: by Carey (new)

Carey (thetometraveller) | 109 comments That stinks! You'll be glad to know that even after being married thirty years David still thinks Alexandra is dazzlingly beautiful. I'm still annoyed by it. :)


message 45: by Misfit (new)

Misfit | 478 comments Mod
Michele wrote: "Okay, Marg & Carey, in an unfortunate twist of events, it turns out that Walkabout is the only book of the series I do NOT have. So read on valiantly and I will find a copy and catch up later...."

I won't be getting to it soon either so we can be behind together :)


message 46: by [deleted user] (new)

Misfit wrote: "Michele wrote: "Okay, Marg & Carey, in an unfortunate twist of events, it turns out that Walkabout is the only book of the series I do NOT have. So read on valiantly and I will find a copy and cat..."

Oh good....I found a copy on BookMooch and it's sent, but will take a couple weeks to get here, I assume.


message 47: by Misfit (new)

Misfit | 478 comments Mod
OK, I'm sure I saw this one in the library catalog so I'll put a hold in a week or so.


message 48: by Carey (new)

Carey (thetometraveller) | 109 comments The Wall Street Journal has a column called "Booklover" and today's was about Australian authors...they recommended two HF books set in Australia:
The Secret River by Kate Grenville The Secret River by Kate Grenville and
True History of the Kelly Gang by Peter Carey True History of the Kelly Gang by Peter Carey (about 19th century bushrangers).

Has anyone read either or have any interest in reading them?? Both look good to me.


message 49: by [deleted user] (new)

I've heard of the Peter Carey book....is it really fiction?


message 50: by Marg (new)

Marg (margreads) | 128 comments I've read The Secret River and thoughtit was quite good. There is also another book by Kate Grenville called The Lieutenant. The books aren't related except by subject in that they are set at colonisation of Australia. She is releasing a third book with this setting this year.

I haven't read True History of the Kelly Gang, although the story of the Kelly gang is part of Australian legend now, but I have read one other book by Peter Carey. He is more literary fiction than genre fiction but it would be interesting to read the book I think.


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