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Members' favorites & nostalgia > What Famous Children's Story Did You Miss Out on Until You Were an Adult?

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message 1: by ABC (new)

ABC (mary6543) | 341 comments I read the "Inkspell" series by Cornelia Funke and in it is talks about "The Brave Little Tin Soldier" As I read "Inkspell", I thought I HAVE NEVER HEARD OR READ THIS STORY! So I didn't know about the soldier, or his leg, or the ballerina.....

Anyway, I have made sure to read "The Brave Little Tin Soldier" to ds more than once!

Has this ever happened to you? A really important story or book that just sort of got left out of your reading while you were growing up?


message 2: by Eastofoz (new)

Eastofoz Yup! "The House that Jack Built" I had heard of but it was never read to me in it's entirety, same with the long version of "Old Mother Hubbard".

I had the Brave Little Tin Soldier in a Hans Christian Anderson collection. I loved that one :)


message 3: by ABC (last edited Nov 02, 2010 04:33PM) (new)

ABC (mary6543) | 341 comments I am trying to make sure ds hears the Hans Christian Andersen stories....like the real ending of "The Little Mermaid."

"Anne of Green Gables" was also left out of my youth. I didn't read the series until I was an adult and loved it. (Though I definitely won't force Anne on ds!)

We've done the long version of "Mother Hubbard." I don't know about "The House that Jack Built."


message 4: by Kathryn, The Princess of Picture-Books (new)

Kathryn | 6179 comments Mod
Kirei--I love your question! I'm going to put my thinking cap on because I feel certain this happened to me! I also relabeled the thread (hope that's okay) because I'm surprised more people haven't posted wondering if people thought it was JUST about the Tin Solder--I think your broader question is topic a lot of people will want to comment on ;-)


message 5: by Brenda (new)

Brenda | 192 comments The Tale of Peter Rabbit by Beatrix Potter and pretty much all of Winnie-the-Pooh I had the pleasure of reading these as an adult and sharing them with my son. I so would have loved them as a child as well.


message 6: by Lisa (new)

Lisa Vegan (lisavegan) | 1077 comments So many, it turns out. Winnie-the-Pooh and the other books in that series is one that comes to mind. I'm sure I'll think of others to add, but I'm in a hurry right now.


message 7: by Manybooks (new)

Manybooks | 8489 comments Mod
I only read the Little House on the Prairie books after I had started university, and as interesting as the books were, I was kind of taken aback at the way Native Americans were described. Also, I had watched the TV series, and so I was expecting Ma Ingalls especially to very tolerant, and in the books, I felt that she was quite intolerant at times. I know these books are childhood favourites for many, and I did enjoy reading them, but some parts bothered me quite a bit.


message 8: by ABC (new)

ABC (mary6543) | 341 comments I gave a collection of Beatrix Potter stories as a present this summer because I think all kids should have them!


message 9: by Kathryn, The Princess of Picture-Books (last edited Nov 05, 2010 07:48AM) (new)

Kathryn | 6179 comments Mod
I did not read The Wonderful Wizard of Oz or Alice in Wonderland as a child, and when I came to them as a "grown-up" I was not wowed. Though, I had seen the *movies* as a child and loved them. I wonder if I would have been more drawn to the books as a child??? Something tells me I would not have liked The Wonderful Wizard of Oz even then--the story was just too violent for me compared to the film. But, I know they are well-loved by so many, so maybe I would have joined as a young fan!


message 10: by Lisa (new)

Lisa Vegan (lisavegan) | 1077 comments Betsy-Tacy books here too! Except that I might have read Heaven to Betsy and Betsy in Spite of Herself when I was about 10, but when I read them recently, I didn't remember them, so maybe not. I still need to finish that series!


message 11: by Emily (new)

Emily I missed out on a huge swath of fiction about everyday American life: writers like Beverly Cleary, Eleanor Estes, Lois Lowry (thinking particularly of her Anastasia books), as well as the Betsy Tacys, and probably many others. I guess I was an anglophile from an early age, and I generally was more drawn to fantasy.


message 12: by Janice (new)

Janice  Durante | 27 comments I missed out on The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe and Rebecca of Sunnybrook Farm, both of which I would have loved. I got to enjoy them as an adult, reading them to my daughters.


message 13: by Susanna (new)

Susanna | 1 comments Amazingly I missed out on Winnie-the-Pooh, and also Susan Cooper's terrific Dark Is Rising series and Lloyd Alexander's The Book of Three series.


message 14: by Lisa (new)

Lisa Vegan (lisavegan) | 1077 comments Chandra wrote: "A Wrinkle in Time. I think I started reading it too young and I didn't understand it and therefore didn't like it. It's another one on the Newbery list (I think...) "

Has never left my top 10 books from age 9 to today. I've read it more than 100 times, and I can say that about just 3 or 4 or 5 books. And, yes, it won the Newbery. Well deserved, in my opinion!


message 15: by Gloria (new)

Gloria | 12 comments My book club of 12 women, from forty-ish to sixty-ish, just read Wind in the Willows! Many of us had not read it as children and we doubted whether it would have appealed to us as children, even those who were avid readers! We also doubted (some teachers among us) whether kids would enjoy it today. This same group read Alice in Wonderland a few years ago and were surprised to discover all the political satire; probably not a children's book to begin with. There are some beautifully illustrated versions of both titles, which made them fun for sharing and comparing!
So, do we thank Disney for his kid-friendly make-overs, which at least create awareness with kids?


message 16: by Aleea (new)

Aleea | 3 comments I also missed out on the Beatrix Potter stories and The Dark Is Rising Sequence. I'd heard Peter Rabbit before but didn't read all of Potter's works until I was writing a paper on her in college. Similarly, I read The Dark is Rising randomly in middle school but didn't figure out it was a series until I was an adult. I really must be dense not to notice the other books right beside it at the library.

I also never read L.M. Boston's Green Knowe series or Elizabeth George Speare's The Bronze Bow as a child. Considering my track record so far, there are probably tons of books I've missed out on so far...

I just need to go straight through the Newbery list, lol.


message 17: by Shannon (new)

Shannon (sianin) | 129 comments I missed all of the Enid Blyton books until I had my own son.


message 18: by Manybooks (new)

Manybooks | 8489 comments Mod
I discovered the existence of the Green Know books (so far, I've only started reading the first of the series) quite by accident a few years ago. I was reading Jean Little's autobiography Little by Little: A Writer's Education, and she mentioned meeting Lucy Boston on a trip to England and that her house was/is supposedly one of the oldest still existing houses in the British isles. So, I found out who Lucy Boston was and ordered the first of the Green Knowe books from Amazon. But, it was Jean Little's autobiography that made me become aware of Lucy Boston, I had not heard of her before I read Little's autobiography.


message 19: by ABC (new)

ABC (mary6543) | 341 comments I missed out on Pippi Longstocking! It never appealed to me when I was a child. I am reading it to ds now and it is quite funny.


message 20: by Brenda (new)

Brenda | 192 comments I too missed out on reading Pippi Longstocking but plan to catch up on the book really soon. Is their an addition that is better than another? I really loved the movie.


message 21: by ABC (new)

ABC (mary6543) | 341 comments I think there are various editions of Pippi. The one I read has some racist bits in it (Notably: "Her skin was as dark as a slave-girl", or something like that.)

I think the IT version now is the Lauren Child versionPippi Longstocking Gift Edition which looks super cute and I assume has the offensive parts cut out.


message 22: by Brenda (new)

Brenda | 192 comments Lauren Child sure made Pippi look alot like her character Lola.


message 24: by [deleted user] (new)

I still haven't read Little Women.


message 25: by Lisa (new)

Lisa Vegan (lisavegan) | 1077 comments Jeannette wrote: "I still haven't read Little Women."

Jeannette, You really must rectify that situation. ;-)

Well, I feel that way about most of the books people have mentioned in this thread, and definitely about all the books I've yet to read.


message 26: by [deleted user] (new)

Lisa wrote: "Jeannette wrote: "I still haven't read Little Women."

Jeannette, You really must rectify that situation. ;-)

Well, I feel that way about most of the books people have mentioned in this thread, an..."


It's funny, because my daughter just read it, maybe two years ago, after much insisting on my part. She enjoyed it so much she read it a second time immediately following the first read. I do have it on my list.


message 27: by Lisa (new)

Lisa Vegan (lisavegan) | 1077 comments Jeannette, It's one of my childhood favorites and I've continued to enjoy it with every reread.


message 28: by Manybooks (new)

Manybooks | 8489 comments Mod
Lisa wrote: "Jeannette wrote: "I still haven't read Little Women."

Jeannette, You really must rectify that situation. ;-)

Well, I feel that way about most of the books people have mentioned in this thread, an..."


I agree with Lisa, read the book, it is excellent, and I'm sure you won't be disappointed. I also find that with every reread, I get something more and something different from the book.


message 29: by Lisa (new)

Lisa Vegan (lisavegan) | 1077 comments Gundula wrote: "I also find that with every reread, I get something more and something different from the book. "

Me too!


message 30: by Shannon (new)

Shannon (sianin) | 129 comments Interesting. I was given Little Women when I was young and I could not get into it. I never finished and it I never felt compelled to try it again as an adult - an honestly I cannot remember anything about it. Perhaps I will try it one of these days.


message 31: by [deleted user] (new)

Thanks, Shannon! Now I don't feel so alone. :)

I do like the movie versions of the story, so I really think I should read it some day. My daughter loved all of the funny parts with Laurie and his pals -- she likes humorous stories.


message 32: by Leigh (new)

Leigh (leighb) I re-read Wind in the Willows as an adult. I still liked it but it's amazing how adult perceptions will change how you view a book.


message 33: by Diana (last edited Dec 22, 2010 06:28PM) (new)

Diana I wasn't born in the states and came when i was 8 years old and read adult classics to learn the language, so I missed out on all the picture book classics like The Story of Ferdinand by Munro Leaf and Corduroy by Don Freeman , luckily though Russia has it's own version of Winnie-the-Pooh! (he's a little more rough around the edges)


message 34: by MashJ (new)

MashJ | 5 comments A Wrinkle in Time


message 35: by Aleea (new)

Aleea | 3 comments Diana, I have to know - How is Pooh rough around the edges in the Russian translation? :)

I've just remembered another book I didn't read until, well, this summer: Five Children and It.

I'm a bad kid-lit connoisseur. Shame on me :P


message 36: by Manybooks (new)

Manybooks | 8489 comments Mod
Aleea wrote: "Diana, I have to know - How is Pooh rough around the edges in the Russian translation? :)

I've just remembered another book I didn't read until, well, this summer: [book:Five Children and It|4518..."


Well, I saw the movie version of "Five Children and It" and I still have not managed to read the book. Usually, I try to read the book before watching the movie, but this time I didn't.


message 37: by Mir (new)

Mir | 60 comments Lucy Boston, LM Montgomery, Enid Blyton, Maud Lovelace -- well, Montgomery and Lovelace I knew about and didn't have any interest in. The other two weren't available at my library. I read Daddy-Long-Legs as a teen and don't think I would have liked it earlier -- I wasn't very patient with stories that didn't have a lot of action.


message 38: by MashJ (new)

MashJ | 5 comments Aleea wrote: "Diana, I have to know - How is Pooh rough around the edges in the Russian translation? :)

I've just remembered another book I didn't read until, well, this summer: [book:Five Children and It|4518..."


I heard a fascinating radio programme (BBC Radio 4) about the Russian version of Pooh recently. I think that I am correct in saying that it wasn't attributed to AA Milne but was exactly the same story but Russianised. Am I correct Diana?


message 39: by MashJ (last edited Dec 30, 2010 02:38PM) (new)

MashJ | 5 comments Gundula wrote: "Aleea wrote: "Diana, I have to know - How is Pooh rough around the edges in the Russian translation? :)

I've just remembered another book I didn't read until, well, this summer: [book:Five Childr..."


Sometimes some of the older classics are easier to get into via the screen version. I think that 5 children and it maybe in that category and also maybe The Railway Children (sniffle) and Swallows and Amazons. My 4 year old absolutely ADORES Swallows and Am'zuns.


message 40: by Mir (new)

Mir | 60 comments Oh yeah, Swallows and Amazons was another one I hadn't read until this year -- thanks to this group, in fact!


message 41: by Manybooks (new)

Manybooks | 8489 comments Mod
Mshj wrote: "Gundula wrote: "Aleea wrote: "Diana, I have to know - How is Pooh rough around the edges in the Russian translation? :)

I've just remembered another book I didn't read until, well, this summer:..."


For "Five Children and It" I actually only realised that the movie was based on a book "after" I had seen the movie. I generally like most books better than the movie versions, like with "Little Women" there have been some very good movie versions, but none of them are on par with the book, which is one of my all-time favourite books.


message 42: by Sandysconnected (new)

Sandysconnected | 5 comments Alice in Wonderland!


message 43: by Manybooks (new)

Manybooks | 8489 comments Mod
Sandysconnected wrote: "Alice in Wonderland!"

I tired reading this as a child and I found it much more enjoyable rereading it when I was an adult.


message 44: by Sandysconnected (new)

Sandysconnected | 5 comments My confession is that I was working as a night staff at a treatment center, and one of my overnight duties was to return the kids' library books to the agency library and shelve them. While I was doing this, I saw Alice, and thought...hmmmm....we were allowed to check out books, and the night shift was looooooooong, so really, that's the only reason I finally got to it.


message 45: by Lisa (new)

Lisa Vegan (lisavegan) | 1077 comments I never much liked Alice until someone gave me an annotated edition:

The Annotated Alice: Alice's Adventures in Wonderland & Through The Looking Glass

Even then, I only liked it, but I do recommend one of the annotated editions.


message 46: by Mir (new)

Mir | 60 comments Funny coincidence, Lisa, I was just reading Caitlin Kiernan talking about how much she loved Annotated Alice.


message 47: by Lisa (new)

Lisa Vegan (lisavegan) | 1077 comments Miriam wrote: "Funny coincidence, Lisa, I was just reading Caitlin Kiernan talking about how much she loved Annotated Alice."

Interesting. I didn't love it, but it helped me like it quite a bit but not enough to constantly reread as I did with books back then.


message 48: by Skylar (new)

Skylar Burris (skylarburris) I never read any Enid Blyton as a child, but read two to my daughter.


message 49: by Manybooks (last edited Jan 11, 2011 01:22PM) (new)

Manybooks | 8489 comments Mod
Abigail wrote: "Skylar wrote: "I never read any Enid Blyton as a child, but read two to my daughter."

Yes! Blyton is definitely a famous children's author I completely bypassed as a child, and discovered as an ad..."


And, I read Enid Blyton in German (the St. Clare's Series). I never realised how different (changes, extra books etc.) from the originals the German versions were, until I read the St. Clare's series in the original, in English; it shocked me and in some ways, I'm still in shock.


message 50: by Skylar (new)

Skylar Burris (skylarburris) ] Of course, part of that is being an American, I think...

I certainly read C.S. Lewis and Roald Dahl and other English authors as a child. But Blyton never made a big impact in the U.S., for some reason. (Not sure why.) I didn't even hear of her until I was an adult.


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