Georgette Heyer Fans discussion

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Heyer in General > Can you suggest

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message 1: by chinami (new)

chinami | 108 comments Is there any author who writes as good as Heyer and Austen?
I heard that the novels of Eve Edwards and Linore Burkard are good. Have anyone read it?


message 2: by Margaret (new)

Margaret | 542 comments I've never, personally, found any author that I liked as well as Heyer, but I think it partly depends on what you like Heyer for. One of the things I love most in her books is her used of language, for instance, and today's authors just don't write that way.

However, the authors that have come closest to satisfying my Regency hunger haven't been romance writers at all, but historical mystery writers, specifically Kate Ross and C.S. Harris with their detectives Julian Kestrel and Sebastian St. Cyr.


message 3: by MashJ (last edited Oct 25, 2010 06:12AM) (new)

MashJ | 28 comments Veronica wrote: "Is there any author who writes as good as Heyer and Austen?
I heard that the novels of Eve Edwards and Linore Burkard are good. Have anyone read it?"


I've never tried the two you mention. I think though that there are qualities of Heyer that are common to other authors of that time. I find a lot of modern authors are just too sparse on word count and having a decent plot seems to be very non-trendy at the moment unless you are reading thrillers!
So I agree with Margaret- it will depend on what you are looking for- if you are after a similar voice then quite a lot of pre and post war women writers in the UK have a not totally disimilar tone (Christie, Sayers, Kaye, Tey, PLaidy). Whereas if you are looking for historical romance no really similar writers immediately come to mind. You mention Austen and another of my favourite novelists of that period would be George Elliot- Middlemarch is a must read of the Victorian times.

Edit- I see that the authors you mention are both being published at the moment. If you want to try some other authors writing romance about similar periods maybe Mary Jo Putney, Jo Beverley, Mary Balogh, Liz Carlyle or Lisa Kleypas might suit. I like them but they are quite different to Georgette Heyer.


message 4: by chinami (new)

chinami | 108 comments Margaret wrote: "I've never, personally, found any author that I liked as well as Heyer, but I think it partly depends on what you like Heyer for. One of the things I love most in her books is her used of language..."

I like her writing for the beautiful language and here portrayal of the regency world, the fashion mainly.Every sentence is beautifully crafted that you cannot prevent from falling in love with the language,style, romance and comedy intended in the novel. I visualize the old world through her writing; i find it realistic and far more corroborating than today's regency romances.The novels of this decade have lost their essence and are more sensually inspired that you will scarcely come across a sentence that is longer than 15 words. The story lines are clothed under the regency banner and with not even the slightest hint of the genteel culture not to mention inferior and unfair interpretations of the period. Even if you call it fiction,the authors still can do away with the line by line sexual statements.
If only there were ppl who could actually write like Austen and Heyer.


message 5: by Ilze (last edited Oct 28, 2010 01:31PM) (new)

Ilze (ilzeval) Try Sherry Lynn Ferguson's 'Lord Sidley's Last Season'.

Lord Sidley's Last Season


message 6: by Karlyne (new)

Karlyne Landrum | 3895 comments I wonder if a modern-day Austen or Heyer would find a publisher? It seems that most publishers today cater to the quick read, to words of no more than two syllables with easy vocabularies suitable for the average 6th grader (I read once that today's newspapers are geared to the literacy level of 6th graders). Certainly, however, the smut that is so prevalent is certainly not suitable for 6th graders -or in my opinion, for anyone else looking for more than some cheap fantasy "romance" (how that poor word has been twisted!). I have quit reading authors who are still alive unless they come highly recommended by someone I trust, because I found their books so babyishly written and yet so "adult" in their sexual content. How do we convince writers and publishers that there is a market for quality novels?


message 7: by MashJ (last edited Oct 28, 2010 05:10PM) (new)

MashJ | 28 comments Karlyne wrote: "I wonder if a modern-day Austen or Heyer would find a publisher? It seems that most publishers today cater to the quick read, to words of no more than two syllables with easy vocabularies suitable..."

Eva Ibbotson may suit you but personally I read plenty of books by, er, dead authors and one of the good things about good reads is being lead towards those authors. Another great thing is amazon marketplace (and all of the other second hand bookshops online) etc where you can track down out of print books at sensible prices.

I do think though that it is fatal to look for "books similar too" - enjoy each individual book and author for what they offer. Genre reading has its place (especially for some not too challenging escapism) so if you want to go off and read plenty of Scandinavian crime authors they are all there (I have have had a phase of this!!) but eventually they tend to start blending into one.

As for unsuitable content I would have to mention Elliot (I read Adam Bede recently and that had a fairly brutal plotline ) and also Richardson - both of whom were criticized for the content of their books when they were published. Walter Scott was thought to be too lightweight (as was Jane Austen)! Coming from the UK I'm not sure what age a sixth grader is but personally I was reading books like The Mayor of Casterbridge and Anya Seton's Katherine at about 11. They were what was available at home and both were pretty adult although in different ways.

I take your point about sexual content and selecting authors who's work you prefer without this is fair enough. Personally I can't read anything with children being hurt- so I have had to send quite a few crime books to the second hand shop after getting a few pages in and finding it's about a child murder.

Would Austen and Heyer find a publisher- yes, I hope so- but their books wouldn't be the same because anything written in 2010 has a very different background to something written in 1810 or 1950. Like you I am not taken with a lot of current authors but of course the wheat has been sorted from the chaff in books from earlier periods being republished now. For a superbly written contemporary "romance" try Vikram Seth's "A Suitable Boy". I'm pretty sure there are some long sentences in that one & no sex!


message 8: by AMythicalBeast (new)

AMythicalBeast | 3 comments As Ilze suggested, I tried Sherry Lynn Ferguson's works. Problem was that I could only read a few chapter exerpts, since her books are mostly hardbacks and very expensive (20 to 30$). I couldn't find her ebooks on Amazon and find it frustrating that they are so hard to lay hands on.


message 9: by Ravneet (new)

Ravneet (rkkr) | 8 comments @Karlyne

I totally agree with you. I was shocked when I first read a historical romance written by a contemporary author because I wasn't expecting explicit sexual scenes. In my ignorance I had assumed that modern day novels would resemble the sweet romances of Austen and other classical writers. But I can't completely bash on today's romance novels because I do enjoy some of them that offer characters with depth and solid, interesting plots. Many, however, use this general formula to define romance: Strong, unexplainable sexual attraction + physical beauty = love at first sight followed closely by true love.


message 10: by MashJ (new)

MashJ | 28 comments I think that there may be a clean reads group on goodreads that may be of interest to some people.


message 11: by chinami (new)

chinami | 108 comments Ravneet wrote: "@Karlyne

I totally agree with you. I was shocked when I first read a historical romance written by a contemporary author because I wasn't expecting explicit sexual scenes. In my ignorance I had as..."


Neither did i expect detailed explanation of sexual scenes.When it's between Money or superior writing, most of today's romance writers(doesn't include paranormal fiction) pick the former one; as long as it brings them large returns, they don't care about the content.They give an illusion of 18th-19th century England as a backdrop and occasional mention to the titles of the heroes who happen to be the most scandalous in the town; perhaps they got confused the regency era for medieval era or 21st century.Not that their entire standpoint is wrong, the possibility of being true is equal to that of being inaccurate;bottom line is that there is shortage in the amount of research. Sadly there are people who read books replete in sexual stuff, only that this has narrowed down to a handful of those who give more importance to language and content. Even the titles seem too cheesey, most of the time i end up wondering whether I'm reading a regency romance or 21st century love story; the one distinguishing factor is that there are no mentions of new-age gadgets. :D


message 12: by Deanna (new)

Deanna (stackshavemercy) | 5 comments Ilze wrote: "Try Sherry Lynn Ferguson's 'Lord Sidley's Last Season'.

Lord Sidley's Last Season"


Added! Thanks for the tip.


message 13: by MashJ (last edited Feb 26, 2011 02:13PM) (new)

MashJ | 28 comments I have checked both the groups and the listopia and typing in clean reads may get you some of the way towards the sort of books you are looking for. Unfortunately the list on the listopia looked very generic to me (does Stephanie Meyer HAVE to be included on every list!!)- maybe the groups are better.

Veronica- I totally agree- historical accuracy is the biggest bugbear for me. I recently picked up a book where a regency heroine strolls into a pub whilst the hero is having a pint and a game of darts. Aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaagh.

Of course some books written in the nineteenth century were racier than others and many others had allusions. If you think about it a fair few of the nineteenth century classics were about affairs- Anna Karenina, Madam Bovary, The Age of Innocence. Plenty of other books featured illegitimacy but I do take your point that many people prefer the bedroom door to stay closed. My current classic read is Pamela and I can only say that the allusions are endless and I'm not convinced I'll finish this book if the plot doesn't move on in some way.

BTW I cannot recommend Edith Wharton highly enough for those who like their historic reads without a guaranteed HEA.

Anna Karenina by Leo Tolstoy Madame Bovary by Gustave Flaubert The Age of Innocence by Edith Wharton Pamela Or Virtue Rewarded (Oxford World's Classics) by Samuel Richardson


message 14: by chinami (new)

chinami | 108 comments Mshj wrote: "I have checked both the groups and the listopia and typing in clean reads may get you some of the way towards the sort of books you are looking for. Unfortunately the list on the listopia looked v..."

I read Anna Karenina and i do have Madame Bovary with me, I'll read it. thanks


message 15: by Teresa (new)

Teresa Edgerton (teresaedgerton) | 151 comments Clare Darcy wrote Heyer-esque Regency romances. Most of them are not especially good, but Regina and Cressida are. I would recommend those, if you can find them.


message 16: by Peregrina651 (new)

Peregrina651 (peregrina651peregrinations) | 37 comments AAARRRGGGHHHH!! I agree with you all!!! I am not a prude but I am so sick of the sophomoric soft core porn (well, isn't it??)that the publishers have been pushing on us for years--and yes, I blame it on the publishers. The requisite 3 excruciatingly explicit scenes have become trite to the point of boring and gratuitous to the point of irrelevance and yet they continue to publish the same dross month after month, year after year. No wonder I keep re-reading GH and other older authors. Thank you TV and movies; all we want today is action and dialogue.


message 17: by chinami (new)

chinami | 108 comments Peregrina651 wrote: "AAARRRGGGHHHH!! I agree with you all!!! I am not a prude but I am so sick of the sophomoric soft core porn (well, isn't it??)that the publishers have been pushing on us for years--and yes, I blame ..."

well put.


message 18: by Barbara (last edited Mar 05, 2012 10:19PM) (new)

Barbara (sema4dogz) | 435 comments Mshj said " BTW I cannot recommend Edith Wharton highly enough for those who like their historic reads without a guaranteed HEA"

And the complete works of EW are available on Kindle. Priced NOTHING!

PS I;m not sure what a 'guaranteed HEA' is, sorry .


message 19: by Karlyne (new)

Karlyne Landrum | 3895 comments I don't know what "HEA" is, either. I can think of a few words that would fit, but they just crack me up and I don't think they're right!


message 20: by Hannah (new)

Hannah (hannahr) Karlyne wrote: "I don't know what "HEA" is, either. I can think of a few words that would fit, but they just crack me up and I don't think they're right!"

HEA = Happily Ever After

Would love to know your "alternatives"!


message 21: by Barbara (last edited Apr 22, 2012 10:36PM) (new)

Barbara (sema4dogz) | 435 comments Kate said "Ooh, I will give that (Pat Barkers Regeneration Trilogy) a try. I confess my attraction to the history of WWI was really the result of Rilla of Ingleside. The attitudes in the US vs. those in Canada or England are quite interesting - not that the US was a lot better at understanding conscientious objection. "

Hi Kate I moved over here as I though we might be getting too far off topic on Barrren Corn et al. Anyway, I do hope you can manage to get Pat Barker , I think you will really like her. Speaking of WW1, I just read - I must confess with some dogged ploughing in the really detailed parts - Eternal France by Norah Lofts and Margery Weiner. Weiner is a straight historian, Lofts is my utter favourite author- see our Fans Of .. group here on Goodreads if you are interested.
It's a history of France from Revolution to WW2 and whilst it has nothing about CO in it, it's account of WW1 is very moving indeed. Nothing touches Grave's Goodbye To All That of course, but as a history, it's pretty good.


message 22: by Kate (new)

Kate (kwolicki) | 43 comments Barbara said "Eternal France by Norah Lofts and Margery Weiner. Weiner is a straight historian, Lofts is my utter favourite author- see our Fans Of .. group here on Goodreads if you are interested.
It's a history of France from Revolution to WW2 and whilst it has nothing about CO in it, it's account of WW1 is very moving indeed. Nothing touches Grave's Goodbye To All That of course, but as a history, it's pretty good. "
Thank you! I will try both of those. Also thank you for moving the thread, it definitely belongs over here.


message 23: by Barbara (new)

Barbara (sema4dogz) | 435 comments Thanks Kate - now I feel we can expand as much as we like without annoying anybody.


message 24: by Louise Sparrow (new)

Louise Sparrow (louisex) | 458 comments I would recommend Clare Darcy, her books are very much in the same vein as Georgette Heyer.

Though they're not as good as Heyer, they are definitely not sexual romps. I don't know why when a romance book is written for adults now, it has to be explicit.

I don't really mind in some cases and as others have said, I'm not a prude, but on the whole I'd rather have a plot.


message 25: by Yue (new)

Yue | 44 comments I did not read it yet, but I read great reviews about Edenbrooke


message 26: by Amanda (new)

Amanda | 7 comments Ilze wrote: "Try Sherry Lynn Ferguson's 'Lord Sidley's Last Season'.

I have now read 4 of Sherry Lynn Ferguson's novels based off of this recommendation and I had to report back and say what an excellent recommendation it was!! This author is now officially locked in as my second favorite to Georgette Heyer. Cute, clean and clever. That's all I ask and am usually disappointed...but Ms. Ferguson seems to have the formula down. I sincerely hope she has more books in the works. I haven't been this excited about an author since I first discovered Heyer 5 years ago! Go read her books...enjoy!

Also, I wanted to mention that I have read Edenbrooke and it was just so-so for me....there was one really great scene...but not written cleverly enough for my taste. For what it's worth...


message 27: by Suzanne (new)

Suzanne | 20 comments Danse de la Folie is one of the most enjoyable books I've read in a while.

Sarah Eden's written a few really good clean Regency novels.

Edenbrooke was pretty good, but not great. It lacked depth, IMO.


message 28: by Teresa (new)

Teresa Edgerton (teresaedgerton) | 151 comments If you like the eighteenth century settings as well as the Regency, and are not set on social comedy along with the romance, there are a few books by Rafael Sabatini that might fit: Scaramouche, and Venetian Masque. Vanity Fair by Thackeray has great Napoleonic era social comedy, but it's not romantic because the heroine is not at all sympathetic, nor meant to be. Sticking with older books, The Scarlet Pimpernel by Baroness Orczy has a strong romantic element along with all the swashbuckling.

And if I might insert a small plug: if you like fantasy combined with (chaste) romance and adventure in an eighteenth century setting, you might check out my own Goblin Moon.


message 29: by Amanda (new)

Amanda | 7 comments Just read Danse de la Folie...it was lovely!!! I recommend it as well.


message 30: by Courtney (new)

Courtney (cakt1991) Julie Klassen is a good one. She writes in the same vein as Heyer...very Austen inspired. I like The Maid of Fairbourne Hall by Julie Klassen . It's a good combination of the romance and mystery, if you like that sort of thing.


message 31: by Sophie (new)

Sophie | 104 comments Definitely want to read some of hers! They look great! And they are regency romances - perfect!


message 32: by Tracy (new)

Tracy Can anyone tell me if there are any GH novels where the story takes place during Christmas or New Years? Not necessarily the entire story, either, but I enjoy reading a few holiday season stories this time of year: the literary equivalent of watching "It's a Wonderful Life" I suppose.


message 33: by Hannah (new)

Hannah (hannahr) Tracy wrote: "Can anyone tell me if there are any GH novels where the story takes place during Christmas or New Years? Not necessarily the entire story, either, but I enjoy reading a few holiday season stories t..."

I don't know about her regency romances, but Heyer has a murder mystery set at Christmas:

Envious Casca Envious Casca by Georgette Heyer


message 34: by Tracy (new)

Tracy Hannah wrote: "Heyer has a murder mystery set at Christmas"

That's wonderful! My mom gave me a copy of Envious Casca a few months ago, but I didn't know it was set during the holidays! Thanks Hannah!


message 35: by Hannah (new)

Hannah (hannahr) Tracy wrote: "That's wonderful! My mom gave me a copy of Envious Casca a few months ago, but I didn't know it was set during the holidays! Thanks Hannah!"

You're welcome. Let us know what you think of it!


message 36: by Chris (last edited Jan 18, 2013 12:48PM) (new)

Chris I wanted to make a few suggestions:

I came to Heyer after reading “A Civil Campaign” by Louis McMaster Bujold. She called it a comedy of manners and I read somewhere that it was a homage to Heyer. After that I had to read all the Heyer books too, which I loved.

A Civil Campaign is a science fiction and part of the Miles Vorkosigan series. It might stand on its own but the entire series is excellent (in my opinion) and A Civil Campaign is definitely THE highlight. And the closest to Heyer’s style I’ve ever found. The entire series starts off with “Shards of Honor”.

Two other books by Bujold that are excellent are “The Curse of Chalion” and “Paladin of Souls”. These are medieval fantasy and I find them extremely satisfying. She’s got a great writing style – definitely not 6th grade.

Then I just discovered some Regency e-books at my library, which I’m enjoying. They are by Joan Wolf and apparently from the 1980s. There are more by her but these I’ve read so far:
- Fool’s Masquerade
- A London Season
- A Double Deception


message 37: by Amanda (new)

Amanda | 7 comments Chris, are these books clean like Georgette Heyer's? I am very interested and have loved almost all the recommendations on this thread. But I just got burned reading a book called "Ambersley"...which was such a great book and was really loving it but then out of nowhere came an explicit love scene. Not something I appreciate at all! I thought it would be easier to ask than discover for myself...if you wouldn't mind letting me know! Thanks!


message 38: by Chris (last edited Jan 16, 2013 11:28AM) (new)

Chris Hi Amanda, none of these have any explicit love scenes.

Bujold has a lot of male fans too, including all the males in my family. Just don't get her Sharing Knife series. Those are explicit.


message 39: by Ellen (new)

Ellen | 1 comments Amanda wrote: "Ilze wrote: "Try Sherry Lynn Ferguson's 'Lord Sidley's Last Season'.

I have now read 4 of Sherry Lynn Ferguson's novels based off of this recommendation and I had to report back and say what an ex..."


I've also gone and read Sherry Lynn Ferguson's novels after reading this recommendation, and I have to agree that she has become my favourite after Heyer! Lord Sidley's Last Season was lovely, as was Quiet Meg.


message 40: by Amanda (new)

Amanda | 7 comments Ellen wrote: "Amanda wrote: "Ilze wrote: "Try Sherry Lynn Ferguson's 'Lord Sidley's Last Season'.

I have now read 4 of Sherry Lynn Ferguson's novels based off of this recommendation and I had to report back and..."



I wonder if she'll write anymore!!


message 41: by Kit (new)

Kit Kilroy Teresa wrote: "The Scarlet Pimpernel by Baroness Orczy has a strong romantic element along with all the swashbuckling"

I've read the Scarlet Pimpernel so many times the book fell apart!


message 42: by HJ (new)

HJ | 948 comments Kit wrote: "Teresa wrote: "The Scarlet Pimpernel by Baroness Orczy has a strong romantic element along with all the swashbuckling"

I've read the Scarlet Pimpernel so many times the book fell apart!"


Did you ever read any of the sequels? What did you think of them?


message 43: by Ellen (new)

Ellen | 89 comments Put Lord Sidley's Last Season on my Kindle. Thanks for the recommendation. I am really looking forward to reading it.


message 44: by Jaima (new)

Jaima | 140 comments Kit wrote: "Teresa wrote: "The Scarlet Pimpernel by Baroness Orczy has a strong romantic element along with all the swashbuckling"

I've read the Scarlet Pimpernel so many times the book fell apart!"


I loved that one! I also really enjoyed her book, "The First Sir Percy".


message 45: by Regina (last edited Apr 09, 2013 08:41AM) (new)

Regina Sirois I think that Dodie Smith is neck and neck with Heyer and Ibbotson. I also discovered a debut historical fiction writer this year and realized that she is posting on this board! How appropriate. Jaima Fixsen wrote Fairchild and I thought it was as hilarious and authentic as an Austen, and just as clean and respectable. I would recommend it to Heyer fans.


message 46: by Yue (new)

Yue | 44 comments I've recently read Lord Sayer's Ghost, which I found very similar to Georgette, or at least, has a "Georgette's air". Regency, with an 'amused rake', smart heroine, clean romance, mystery, action...


message 47: by QNPoohBear (new)

QNPoohBear | 1393 comments Jude Morgan comes the closest to Jane Austen/Georgette Heyer hybrid. I loved Indiscretion. Old writers Daisy Vivian and Clare Darcy are good. Marion Chesney (not super clean but nothing graphic) is very funny and she includes a lot of period details and language. You might like Marion Devon, Susan Caroll and some of the other older writers. Barbara Metzger is my favorite of the Signet and Zebra paperback era Regency writers followed by Carola Dunn and Carla Kelly.

I just transferred reviews from my blog http://bluestockingmusings.blogspot.com

check out my book list to see what looks good. I like funny, comedy of manner stories a la Georgette Heyer.


message 48: by Anne (new)

Anne | 265 comments Qnpoohbear wrote: "Jude Morgan comes the closest to Jane Austen/Georgette Heyer hybrid. I loved Indiscretion. Old writers Daisy Vivian and Clare Darcy are good. Marion Chesney (not super clean but nothing graphic) is..."

I will have to check some of those authors out, thank you a lot! ;) I am always so eager to find authors that write similar to what Georgette Heyer and Jane Austen have written!


message 49: by Jaima (last edited Nov 20, 2013 08:41PM) (new)

Jaima | 140 comments Qnpoohbear wrote: "Jude Morgan comes the closest to Jane Austen/Georgette Heyer hybrid. I loved Indiscretion. Old writers Daisy Vivian and Clare Darcy are good. Marion Chesney (not super clean but nothing graphic) is..."

I just discovered Carla Kelly! I've read about 8 so far, and most of them I enjoyed. I absolutely loved Mrs. Drew Plays Her Hand and Miss Whittier Makes a List. Are there any you specifically recommend?

Mrs. Drew Plays Her Hand by Carla Kelly Miss Whittier Makes a List by Carla Kelly


message 50: by QNPoohBear (new)

QNPoohBear | 1393 comments Jaima wrote: "Qnpoohbear wrote: "Jude Morgan comes the closest to Jane Austen/Georgette Heyer hybrid. I loved Indiscretion. Old writers Daisy Vivian and Clare Darcy are good. Marion Chesney (not super clean but ..."

I've only read Carla Kelly's novellas but enjoyed them.
You would like Carola Dunn too. Her books are very funny. If you like funny Regency love stories I like Judith Nelson. Her books are old and out of print but I managed to track some down. Barbara Metzger is my favorite old Regency author. Her books approach screwball comedy.

Mary Robinette Kowal writes amazingly detailed Regency set fantasy novels. Shades of Milk and Honey is like Sense and Sensibility but slightly darker. She's not so funny as Georgette Heyer but she knows how to build her world and create memorable characters.


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