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message 1: by [deleted user] (last edited Oct 19, 2010 09:47PM) (new)

Myna Madness

Tip tip tap tip tap tip tap tap tip,
mongrel things, they’re on the roof again
driving me insane with their boisterous
fighting, the water hose disperses them
for a short time as they retreat to nearby
powerlines, where, through their satanic,
yellow patch eyes, watch my every move,
if I walk towards them they warn each other
with that annoying aaark! aaark! aaark!
before, fleeing a slight distance further,
as if they know, how much they frustrate me,
why?, why did our academic genius’s
introduce these feathered devil’s disciples,
when, Mr. and Mrs. Average could have
told them the outcome, you don’t need
a degree to see the destruction, and death,
of native birdlife accruing each day.
Cunningness, out shines the fox,
breeding, out does the rabbit,
area's inhabited, out strips the toad,
they tease, provoke and strut with boldness
as they start to return, while I,
move back inside.

Tip tip tap tip tap tip tap tap tip.

MONGRELS !!!!!!!

David J Delaney
20/10/2010 ©


message 2: by [deleted user] (new)

This would be an amusing poem if it weren't so accurate. ::sigh::

I wonder has there ever been an introduced species that has been successful, and solved a problem. Or is it only the environmental disasters that we hear about?


message 3: by Janet (new)

Janet | 32 comments David, I really like the story of this poem. Okay, I have heard of a myna, but never seen one. Are they similar to ravens? Why were they introduced, by your lot of brilliant bureaucrats?


message 4: by [deleted user] (new)

G'day Gail & Janet, thank you for your comments.

Janet, here is a link.

http://www.abc.net.au/science/article...


message 5: by [deleted user] (last edited Oct 19, 2010 07:39PM) (new)

This is the Indian Myna

[image error]

Here is an article that explains the problem. Pest control was why they were introduced. Isn't that always the case?

http://www.abc.net.au/science/article...


message 6: by Mandapanda (new)

Mandapanda If only we could teach them to kill cane toads!


message 7: by Janet (new)

Janet | 32 comments David wrote: "G'day Gail & Janet, thank you for your comments.

Janet, here is a link.

http://www.abc.net.au/science/article..."


Gail "cyborg" wrote: "This is the Indian Myna



Here is an article that explains the problem. Pest control was why they were introduced. Isn't that always the case?

http://www.abc.net.au/science/article......"


David, Cute bird! I just knew that if I waited a couple of minutes you would, as always, provide me with a link. Thank you. Just loved that poem.


message 8: by [deleted user] (new)

Mandy wrote: "If only we could teach them to kill cane toads!"

Now that would be a useful thing.


message 9: by [deleted user] (new)

Thanks Janet, they do look cuter 'not breathing' (-:


message 10: by [deleted user] (new)

I've just 'touched' it up a little.


message 11: by Janet (new)

Janet | 32 comments David wrote: "Thanks Janet, they do look cuter 'not breathing' (-:"

Oh, now that was mean!


message 12: by Janet (new)

Janet | 32 comments David wrote: "I've just 'touched' it up a little."

Janet wrote: "David, I really like the story of this poem. Okay, I have heard of a myna, but never seen one. Are they similar to ravens? Why were they introduced, by your lot of brilliant bureaucrats?"

Gail "cybo control was why they were introduced. Isn't that always the case?

http://www.abc.net.au/science/article......"


After reading the article I have changed my mind about this bird. Still cute, but what a major pest. Watch out for those mites getting in your house, David.


message 13: by [deleted user] (new)

No worries Janet, I regularly check for possible nesting sites, they don't last long around my place. (-:


message 14: by Janet (new)

Janet | 32 comments Glad to hear it. So do you exterminate them, so to speak?


message 15: by [deleted user] (last edited Oct 20, 2010 05:07PM) (new)

They are very hard to "get a hold of" unless you have the right trap, they are, to coin a phrase "as cunning as a fox". I have found a couple of nests over the years, 1 had some very young chicks in it, so all went into a sealed plastic bag then into the rubbish bin, the older birds eventually get the idea it's not the place to be & keep a wide berth. (-:


message 16: by Janet (new)

Janet | 32 comments You have some really wild things going on in Australia. What about the bugs (mites) though, from the birds. Had any of those in your house? As you have probably heard New York is getting overrun with bedbugs. Is Australia experiencing the same dilemma?


message 17: by [deleted user] (new)

G'day Janet, I think so many factors go into why, where & how people end up with mites & I believe hygiene is a huge factor, here in Cairns I remember not so long ago our motels & resorts had a plague of bedbugs & they had no real answer to, why!

As far as bird mites go, we have had no trouble with mites at home, as soon as I detect a nest (of any kind) in the guttering or roof area's I remove them then spray a little dettol (antiseptic) on the area. we had a couple of 'sunbirds' or honeyeaters make a nest on a piece of rope (I puposely strung up for their use) near our patio, after the chicks 'left the nest' I sprayed the nest with dettol then quite some time later the birds returned to 'nest' again with no effects from the spray.


message 18: by Janet (new)

Janet | 32 comments Sunbirds, honeyeaters: I will have to look into your birds. Here in NY we have the usual run of the mill birds. Florida has some beauties though. Well, I guess this whole thread is "going to the birds". So thank you for all that info.


message 19: by [deleted user] (new)

At least the birds are improving as the dicussion moves on. :)


message 20: by [deleted user] (new)

G'day Gail, sure is. (-:

Janet, here is a link to our sunbirds.

http://www.google.com.au/images?hl=en...


message 21: by [deleted user] (last edited Oct 20, 2010 08:49PM) (new)

This is one of my favourite garden birds.

eastern spinebill

Not quite as pretty as the sun bird but I think they are exquisite.


message 22: by [deleted user] (new)

Yes, very nice looking birds, colouring is very similar to the Chestnut breasted mannikin.

http://www.birdphotos.com.au/Chestnut...


message 23: by Janet (new)

Janet | 32 comments David wrote: "G'day Gail, sure is. (-:

Janet, here is a link to our sunbirds.

http://www.google.com.au/images?hl=en......"


Well, I must say the sunbirds are lovelier than our Florida birds.


message 24: by Janet (new)

Janet | 32 comments Gail "cyborg" wrote: "This is one of my favourite garden birds.

..."


What a lot of cuties. Loved looking at them.


message 25: by Janet (new)

Janet | 32 comments Gail "cyborg" wrote: "At least the birds are improving as the dicussion moves on. :)"

I agree. Thank you all for showing me your gorgeous birds. I just can't imagine all the interesting, intriguing birds, and animals there are in Australia.


message 26: by [deleted user] (new)

It's our pleasure to share a few of them with you Janet. :)


message 27: by [deleted user] (new)

Here you go Janet.

http://www.google.com.au/images?hl=en...

Enjoy (-:


message 28: by Janet (new)

Janet | 32 comments Gail "cyborg" wrote: "It's our pleasure to share a few of them with you Janet. :)"

Again, thank you, Gail.


message 29: by Janet (new)

Janet | 32 comments David wrote: "Here you go Janet.

http://www.google.com.au/images?hl=en......"


So glad I commented on your poem, David, and that it led to all these lovely and interesting things.


message 30: by Mandapanda (new)

Mandapanda Janet wrote: "David wrote: "Here you go Janet.

http://www.google.com.au/images?hl=en......"


Thanks Janet, I've been enjoying your conversations and pictures too!:)


message 31: by Janet (new)

Janet | 32 comments Mandy wrote: "Janet wrote: "David wrote: "Here you go Janet.

http://www.google.com.au/images?hl=en......"


Fantastic stuff! Thank you so much.


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