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The Name of the Rose > Lost Literature

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message 1: by theduckthief (new)

theduckthief | 269 comments Mod
If the works of literature lost to time still existed, would they have any impact on our daily lives?


message 2: by Everyman (new)

Everyman theduckthief wrote: "If the works of literature lost to time still existed, would they have any impact on our daily lives?"

Doesn't that partly depend on whether you believe that ANY works of literature have impact on our daily lives? Make the case for that, and I'll make the case that if we discovered a lost manuscript from Aristotle or Dante or Milton or Austen or Shakespeare it would have an impact on our daily lives.


message 3: by Alex (new)

Alex It'd certainly have an impact on my life, but then...I'm a geek. I'd kill to read Shakespeare's Cardenio, the play he supposedly based off an episode in Don Quixote.


message 4: by theduckthief (new)

theduckthief | 269 comments Mod
What about "The Jungle" by Upton Sinclair? Because of his book, the US passed the Meat Inspection Act and the Pure Food and Drug Act. This made meat safer to eat; it was no longer diseased or being stuff with sawdust.


message 5: by Betty (new)

Betty (olderthan18) Alex wrote: "It'd certainly have an impact on my life, but then...I'm a geek. I'd kill to read Shakespeare's Cardenio, the play he supposedly based off an episode in Don Quixote."

I recently borrowed Arden Shakespeare's Double Falsehood, the play about which you're writing, from the city library. The contemporary title was probably "A History of Cardenio", William Shakespeare and John Fletcher Francis Beaumont performing it in 1613. The story is similar to the Cardenio one in Don Quixote.


message 6: by Alex (new)

Alex Interesting, Asmah! Have you read it yet?

I've heard previously that, assuming the play did exist, it was probably co-written with Fletcher. Doesn't bode well, since I loathed their collaboration on Henry VIII. But it's still really fun to think about. And I love the Cardenio story; it's one of my favorite episodes in Don Quixote.


message 7: by Everyman (new)

Everyman theduckthief wrote: "What about "The Jungle" by Upton Sinclair? Because of his book, the US passed the Meat Inspection Act and the Pure Food and Drug Act. This made meat safer to eat; it was no longer diseased or being..."

Fair enough. I was thinking of literature having an effect on the individual directly, not through society. But my question was maybe unfair, because I do agree that some works of literature can have direct impacts on individuals. I know, for example, that when I was young the Diary of Anne Frank had a tremendous influence on me, and that although I thought Uncle Tom's Cabin was turgid and almost unreadable, it had a tremendous impact on many people at the time.


message 8: by Alex (new)

Alex Interesting perspective on The Jungle here: six books your English teacher got wrong. It's not from the most authoritative of sources, and I haven't read it myself, so presented without judgment.


message 9: by theduckthief (new)

theduckthief | 269 comments Mod
I feel a little bad that Sinclair's message wasn't interpreted the way he wanted. But hey, he still had an impact on the public, even if they didn't all become Socialists.


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