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message 1: by [deleted user] (new)

How do new authors deal with the multiple potentials of time-consuming social media outlets...ie blogs, twitter, Amazon author's page, Facebook, etc? My publisher closed last month and now "I" am salesman for my hardcover and audiobooks...sure cuts into time for writing more books!! thanks! Liam


message 2: by Nina (new)

Nina Stone (ninastone) That's what I'd like to know!!


message 3: by Carla (new)

Carla René (carlaren) | 82 comments By treating it like a job.

Oh, and recently, more and more publishers who do contract you for books are requiring marketing plans to accompany your MS during submission, so it makes no sense to me that authors sign away 93% of their ebook royalties to publishers who expect that YOU market your own book anyway, when you could simply skip the publisher, keep your 70% eBook royalties from Amazon and make back your money.

I spend 16-hours a day, sometimes more, sitting here working all of those mediums. I take regular breaks from editing one book and writing another, to work the marketing. I have my regular blog fed into Goodreads.com and Amazon Author's pages automatically, as well as Facebook, through NetworkedBlogs.com. So that takes a lot of the work out of it, because when I make one blog post, it automatically gets fed to 4 other outlets, including Twitter.

If you haven't picked it up yet, invest $2.99 into "A Newbie's Guide to Publishing" by my friend, J.A. Konrath. He spent 3 years compiling his own blog posts into a solid one-stop book about the pros and cons of self-publishing, and how authors can make the most of their own marketing opportunities.

I also talk about this some, from a new perspective that's been called very refreshingly honest, at my own blog:

http://carlarene.blogspot.com

Take advantage of each of the Author's pages that is available to you. Study their features, learn how to make the most of their own marketing techniques. Then get involved in other sites that allow independent authors the chance to toot their own horn. There is Kindleboards.com , THE #1 place Kindle readers go to find new and exciting authors and books, then there's Nookboards.com/forum if you have a book on BN.com or have published through Pubit! or Smashwords.com . Get involved in the Amazon Discussion Community. There are PLENTY of threads available that allow you to promote your book in the fiction community. Barnes and Noble also has a discussion community. I've also added a store through my Facebook Fanpage through Payvment.com where customers can purchase my books without ever having to leave their Facebook page. I'm also contributing author at several sites so that's another way I get involved and get my name out there. I also make sure that on each site where I'm involved: Goodreads, Shelfari, my own web-site, my own blog, Facebook, etc., I have my books listed for sale on EACH of those sites, so my customers do not have to leave those pages in order to purchase my books. As a web-designer, I know if you let the customer leave your site, chances are high that they will get distracted with something else and not return. Why take that chance?

I also host other authors on my own blog. For instance, since Joe Konrath and I have known each other since 2000 (We met in the same critique group and I was his first web-designer when he landed his Hyperion book deal), he asked me to be a beta reader for DRACULAS, being released solely on Kindle on Tuesday, and in return, I posted a very funny and irreverent interview with two of its authors on my own blog, which in turn, received me a reciprocal link on theirs.

So, there's a LOT of networking involved. Right now, I'm hyping the release of my first full-length novel, The Gaslight Journal, in preparation for its Thanksgiving Day release, and luckily, I can utilise a lot of my contacts for that very purpose.

Of course, you still can't discount the value of sending mass mailings out to potential readers, to libraries, offering to do book-signings at bookstores and book-readings any place you can find an open mic, and contacting the local newspapers with a press release, offering to give them an exclusive interview if they will mention your book. Also works with the radio, too.

I'm a contributing guest columnist at 1stturningpoint.com and it's an entire community of both published and indie authors, as well as artists in general, so the colums are almost always geared at how to make the most of your opportunities.

There. That should get you started. ;)

Good-luck.


message 4: by J. (last edited Oct 16, 2010 07:55PM) (new)

J. Guevara (jguevara) | 3 comments Carla, well put. Excellent! The first lesson an indie learns; writing a novel ain't the half of it.It's not even a 10th of it. 16-hour days marketing, sounds about right; a little conservative maybe, but ballpark.
The next thing they learn is even with all the marketing in the world, if you don't have distribution, you ain't gonna sell diddly. And THAT is what you pay 93% for. (Unless, of coarse, you're Sarah Palin or minor #33, but that's another story.) The big boys have the inside track on distribution. Amazon's new premium program ($32, and worth it)has now expanded into wholesaling, and can get you on Ingram's catalog, which is where ALLLLL the bookstores order.
So, your self-publisher, or your vanity press if you were dumb enough to fall for that scam, takes 22%+, Amazon takes another 30%, Ingrams takes 40%, and you're right back to where you started. EXCEPT!!! it's your cover, your novel, your copyright.
But, if the sky should open up, a light shine down upon you, and by some miraculous parting of the Novel Sea your book happens to become a cult hit, the big boys will be knocking at YOUR door. Now you have a more level playing field to negotiate.
Until then, be consoled in the fact that you make more than an illegal dishwasher not covered by minimum wage. Or do you? :):)
As Carla so aptly said, "Good Luck"

j
www.jguevaranovels.com


message 5: by [deleted user] (new)

In other words, Carla, you have no life.:) Yep, I'm finding that out.


message 6: by Patricia (new)

Patricia Sands (patriciasands) | 9 comments Yup! I've joined the crowd! Carla thanks for all of the very helpful info. As you say, 16-hour days are the norm in this new world of social media marketing. One very cool thing about all this is the huge amount of support and tips the indie writing community offers each other. Onward!


message 7: by [deleted user] (new)

I don't know about others, but there are times I feel I'm either drowning in the sea of social media or spinning my wheels on the super highway.


message 8: by Patricia (new)

Patricia Sands (patriciasands) | 9 comments I'm there with you Shawn! I just posted a comment on your blog and then it appeared to vanish. Please let me know if you received it ... another one of the joys of all these sites is not knowing for certain if I've clicked on the correct choice.


message 9: by Justin (new)

Justin South (justinsouth) | 8 comments I agree with you, Carla. The math of the publishing game stinks. I don't shed a tear when I hear another of the greed driven dinosaurs has rolled over and died. Self published and marketed ebooks is the way of the future.


message 10: by William (new)

William Cooper (roguecooper) | 5 comments Social media can be a tricky thing. You need to find a balance between connecting with readers and promoting your work. If all you post are "Hey, buy my book" all day on these sites, people will ignore you and get annoyed quickly. But if all you post is how your neighbor's dog is annoying you, people will ignore you too. You need to balance they "Hey, I'm a real person too" posts with the "Go buy my book please" posts.

One thing I also want to stress is not all publishers leave you stranded on the marketing front. Any decent publisher should have a plan for marketing their books and you should always ask what that is before you sign the contract. I'd never sign a contract for 7% royalties and have the publisher tell me I have to do all the work myself. If I'm doing the work, I want the royalties for it. Never be afraid to turn down a contract if you don't feel comfortable with the terms. If your book is good, you'll be able to find another publisher.


message 11: by [deleted user] (new)

Patricia wrote: "I'm there with you Shawn! I just posted a comment on your blog and then it appeared to vanish. Please let me know if you received it ... another one of the joys of all these sites is not knowing fo..."

No, the comment didn't come through. Thanks for taking the time to read it.:)


message 12: by Petra X (new)

Petra X (petra-x) Justin wrote: "I agree with you, Carla. The math of the publishing game stinks. I don't shed a tear when I hear another of the greed driven dinosaurs has rolled over and died. Self published and marketed ebooks i..."

Obviously you're not a bookshop fan.

I would say that a very large number of people find pleasure in going to a library or bookshop and choosing their books that way. Ebooks don't offer that kind of pleasure.

Local bookshops can be very helpful to local authors. I help with marketing (online), special displays, getting interviews etc. The bookshop wants to sell your book as much as you do and people living in an area will usually at least look at a book of an author living in their locality.


message 13: by Patricia (new)

Patricia Sands (patriciasands) | 9 comments You are right about that Petra. I've just returned from a bookstore visit with my husband and granddaughter which only adds to the pleasure as we browse together through our various areas of interest. Bookstores and libraries are my candy shops! Although my novel, The Bridge Club, is currently only available by ordering online, our local bookstore, The Book Mark (Toronto's oldest independent bookseller), took a look at it and agreed to carry it in their store. I could sell those copies myself but would rather have the honour of seeing it in that special shop. Hopefully in the end the shop and I will both benefit.

In the meantime I'm studying Carla's info in depth so I can get a handle on the social media marketing. Maybe then I can figure out why the message I left on Shawn's blog vanished!!! Arghhhhh!


message 14: by Carla (new)

Carla René (carlaren) | 82 comments I see that as nothing more than a matter of time.

This market hasn't reached its tipping point yet (don't even know if we're close), but when it does, things are going to shift and toss publishers around even more. They think they've been swept off their literary butts now....

I'd like to think libraries and reading rooms aren't bibliophiles, but rather a "racontuerophiles"--they love the reading act and the stories themselves, and not just holding a musty book in their hands. In which case, once they find a steady way of keeping up with the technology (for years now, you've been able to download some books through Streaming Media, via Windows Media Player--I keep my German under my tongue that way), they'll certainly be more than happy to provide it for their clients. I see the days coming when you can check out a Kindle or Nook with a 10-book download limit which gets wiped clean each time you turn it back in.

I think it's time for BN and Amazon to jump-start that train and begin donating those deviced to libraries.


message 15: by Carla (last edited Oct 17, 2010 02:09PM) (new)

Carla René (carlaren) | 82 comments Petra X wrote: "Justin wrote: "I agree with you, Carla. The math of the publishing game stinks. I don't shed a tear when I hear another of the greed driven dinosaurs has rolled over and died. Self published and ma..."

That wasn't even the half of my info, Patricia. But wanted to address one thing first before doing another infodump:

My first full-length novel, The Gaslight Journal, will hit DTP on Thanksgiving Day, and I couldn't be more excited. This book has been a ten-year-long labour of love, mostly not done sooner because of health and circumstances, and a lack of belief in myself as a writer.

I've LONGED to see it in print, smiling back at me from the bookshelves. However, I also long for it to sell as many copies as it can, and right now, for me, the quickest way of doing that will be through DTP.

Eventually, once I've amassed enough profit from it, I will then turn to CreateSpace and their POD, and actually have copies printed I can donate or autograph at book-signings. (Right now, I burn CDs with my current short-story collections in several formats [I use feedbooks.com ] and an autograph and some extra content.) I also hand out coupons for a discounted download with a code they can enter through Smashwords.com , as Amazon doesn't have this capability yet.

Here are the places one can promote books and get involved in writing/critiquing, which, for an indie author, is a BIG deal in knowing how to edit your own work. Do NOT discount the professional services of a freelance editor, because they can be much more objective, but do learn how to police your own work. Sometimes, it just comes out right the first time:

Author Communities to Join and to Promote Your Books:

-Mobileread.com
-Librarything.com
-Redroom.com
http://indiebooksblog.blogspot.com/
http://kindlehomepage.blogspot.com/
http://spaldings-racket.blogspot.com/
http://paperbackdolls.blogspot.com
http://www.kindleobsessed.com/
http://kindlecheapreads.com/
http://redadept.com
http://thecajunbooklady.com
http://theunreadreader.com
http://daileycheapreads.com
http://spaldingsracket.com
http://trishasbookshelf.blogshopt.com
http://kindle-author.blogspot.com
http://kindlereader.blogspot.com
http://twoendsofthepen.blogspot.com
http://tenasbookreview.com
http://rexreadingrobot.com
http://novelcritic.com
http://kindleobsessed.com
http://thefrugalkindle.blogspot.com
http://kindlehomepage.blogspot.com
http://forum.writersdigest.com
http://www.writingforums.org
http://www.theindiespotlight.com

I'll share more as I can.


message 16: by [deleted user] (last edited Oct 17, 2010 05:36PM) (new)

VERY helpful...didn't know about some of these...thanks! who out there can point me to some specific "thriller reader" blogs or sites? Liam www.terminalpolicy.com


message 17: by [deleted user] (last edited Oct 17, 2010 05:36PM) (new)

Carla wrote: "By treating it like a job.

Oh, and recently, more and more publishers who do contract you for books are requiring marketing plans to accompany your MS during submission, so it makes no sense to ..."


Love to hear from your experience...thanks!! Liam www.terminalpolicy.com


message 19: by [deleted user] (new)

just tasted each of them ...thanks! As one psychologist to another...Walker gets it!!! Liam www.terminalpolicy.com


message 20: by Carla (new)

Carla René (carlaren) | 82 comments He will love you to death once I tell him!


message 21: by Justin (new)

Justin South (justinsouth) | 8 comments Petra X wrote: "Justin wrote: "I agree with you, Carla. The math of the publishing game stinks. I don't shed a tear when I hear another of the greed driven dinosaurs has rolled over and died. Self published and ma..."
PetraX, your suggestion that I don't like bookshops was not my topic, nor is it correct.
I was referring to publishers, not bookshops. However bookshops, as you well know are a dying breed also and just what becomes of them in 20 or 50 years remains to be seen.
I believe that Amazon's sales of ebooks already equates to printed book sales, where both versions are offered, after only how many years? Ten? What is likely to happen in another 10 years after the momentum intensifies. And when authors' ebook publishers and self published authors, which the dinosaurs are too gutless to touch, become popular. Dinosaurs insult the market by accepting only 1.5% of submissions from new authors, preferring to stay safe with known authors, thus stultifying their own market place. The new breed of good ebook publishers and self publishing authors is providing new life to the book market and introducing a plethora of books for readers. (Mind you the quality of some mass ebook publishers is appalling. Their strategy is turnover, hoping one or two titles will stick, i.e., become best sellers.)
I refer you to the math, as stated by J in message 4, above:
So, your self-publisher, or your vanity press if you were dumb enough to fall for that scam, takes 22%+, Amazon takes another 30%, Ingrams takes 40%, and you're right back to where you started.
Not much of a return for 3.5 years work, in my case, or 10 years for Carla, is it?
The idea of publishers requiring the author to promote the book for a 93/7 income share is plain highway robbery, another insult. Roll over you greedy dinosaurs, the sooner you vanish, the better.
Now do you see my point, PetraX?


message 22: by Justin (new)

Justin South (justinsouth) | 8 comments Sorry Petra, I used the wrong quotation, I meant to use William's, message 10, above:
"I'd never sign a contract for 7% royalties and have the publisher tell me I have to do all the work myself."
Still the same result, either through a publisher or an extended bookshop distribution process.


message 23: by Petra X (new)

Petra X (petra-x) Justin wrote: " However bookshops, as you well know are a dying breed"

No I don't know. Just because you think so and say so, doesn't mean you can say that I know so. I posted a link from Bargain Book News earlier this year about the opening of something like 27 NEW indie bookstores in NY in the last year or two. I'm sorry I can't find the link now. It was either on the Goodreads blog or Feedback I think.

One thing about the explosion of self-publishing is that everyone now publishes their books. Some would never, even in an ideal world of publishers reading all manuscripts ever get their book in print and some of them will just say the dinosaurs are too gutless to publish my book. (I don't mean your book, just going from your words, I haven't read your book so I'm not referring to it or you in any way). So they publish it themselves and when the book fails to sell they blame the inability to get major publicity. For those people ebooks are a really, really good idea, much less outlay. Whether books that are really good and only get published in ebooks rise to the top and make money I don't know.

I don't agree at all with your figures. You are basically trying to say that you have to pay Amazon 30& and Ingram 40%, well its one or the other, you can't sell the same book in two places, so even accepting the rest of your figures your 7% is really an extra 30% or 40%.

Publishing with Booksurge or other Amazon affiliates is expensive and you can't get on Ingram with some of them for true. But there are other publishing programs that don't take anything like that amount. I buy directly from self-publishing companies, like Xlibris, on books that I've previously bought on Ingram and have sold well. I also buy from PGW which represents many very small indie publishing houses, but no one ever considers these publishers, just the big names.

A book that is Booksurge-published by a local author and selling very well for me sells on Amazon at $16.99. The author wholesales it to me at $10 (I buy a box of 20 at a time) and she is making at least a $1,000 a month, not a huge amount, but not negligible either. She has her books on her website, on about half-a-dozen other websites, in many places in Florida where she lives now, sells in non-traditional places like beach bars and now only works part-time (as an accountant) so she can work on her second book. I gave her book to Macmillan's and they were interested to talk to her, but she says she is making money and controlling it herself and it works for her. Her ebook sales are negligible. Her experience isn't general, but then neither may yours be.

People find things in bookstores and libraries that they don't find online. Its hard to get your book on someone's screen. A good bookbuyer will have interesting selections people don't think of. Also of course your interest is in written books, but a lot of people buy art books, architecture, do-it-yourself books, cookery books and big children's picture books and none of these can be adequately replaced by electronic media.

My sales have not been affected at all by ebooks, as yet. Kindle doesn't work here - I think you have to be in the US or UK for that. I have been asked to bring in B&N's Nook (it must work here) but only by two people.

What happens in 20 or 50 years down the road for books? What happens in 20 or 50 years in any sphere? Difficult in a world where the technology changes so fast to predict even what sort of vehicle will transport us around let alone the nature of bookselling.


message 24: by Carla (new)

Carla René (carlaren) | 82 comments *My sales have not been affected at all by ebooks, as yet. Kindle doesn't work here - I think you have to be in the US or UK for that.

Your profile says you're in Miami. Why won't it work there?


message 25: by Petra X (new)

Petra X (petra-x) I am actually in the Caribbean, see my profile. I don't choose to give away my exact location for security issues. Miami is my second home anyway, at least for shopping.


message 26: by Carla (new)

Carla René (carlaren) | 82 comments Obviously, I DID see your profile, which is how I gleaned you were in Miami.


message 27: by [deleted user] (last edited Oct 18, 2010 04:41AM) (new)

No one can deny the publishing industry has changed and is changing. The main thing is every author - no matter their choice - needs to get as much information about all aspects of the business as possible. Ideally before jumping in, unlike some of us who got caught in this whirlwind and were forced to learn on the job.


message 28: by Justin (new)

Justin South (justinsouth) | 8 comments Hi Petra
Thanks for your informative comments.
I'm pleased for you that your bookshop flourishes in your Caribbean location. And I'm happy to see that your Booksurge self published local author is faring well from her own endeavours.
I have not suggested ebooks will replace all printed genres of books, but it is inevitable, they will certainly continue to erode sales of printed fiction.
Enough on this, I have a novel I wish to continue writing.
Good luck, best wishes and may your cash register ring regularly.
Cheers from down under.
Justin


message 29: by Kevin (last edited Oct 26, 2010 06:03PM) (new)

Kevin Klehr (goodreadscomkevink) | 102 comments Thanks to everyone for posting to this forum. I've learned a lot. My novel is self published by a UK company, but I live in Australia, so the internet, blogs and social media is pretty much all I have. I am pleased that one bookstore will stock my title locally, but for others it's not cost effective to import.

Thanks for the contacts, Carla, and thanks to J for the advice about Amazon's premium package which I am trying to find out more about.

Some other advice I would love if anyone can steer me in the right direction is popular book blogs (say 800+ followers) that might be interested in giving away a gay romance novel set in the Afterlife.

Most of the popular blogs are chic lit based, and a couple of others who I thought might be interested haven't returned my emails. Any suggestions?


message 30: by Susan (new)

Susan Roebuck (sueroe) | 9 comments Hi, I'm new to this discussion and I'm fascinated by all you say. Promoting your new book is a full-time job is absolutely true. It's slow work and almost as painful as the rejections in the submission circuit!
Carla, your links have been wonderful. This discussion has given me more information just while I've been reading it than I've gleaned in the past two months since my book was published.
Sue


message 31: by Grace (new)

Grace Elliot (httpwwwgoodreadscomgraceelliot) | 11 comments Thank you Carla for the contact list ...boy that's going to keep me busy for a while.
Best of luck with your books.
Grace x


message 32: by John (new)

John  Royce (john_royce) Great discussion, glad to have found this group. So it's not just me struggling to be effective in social media and not be overwhelmed!

I'm not sure how long I can do 16-hour days on just promoting/networking ... I have the thing about eating and sleeping.

One thing that helps me to deal is to focus on only a few sites, and then have a few other 'satellites' You have to pick what you like and just work on being real with folks. (The whole 'authors must promote their own books' thing is hilarious in a macabre way because the sites you need to promote on go out of their way to keep you from doing just that.)

Best advice I could offer as to what works: find a few friends and fans, enjoy communicating with them and learn what works for you, then expand efforts ... nothing is a homerun but if you are having at least SOME fun it will go better.


message 33: by Grace (new)

Grace Elliot (httpwwwgoodreadscomgraceelliot) | 11 comments It's such a steep learning curve!
I would never have believed how much time marketting takes up. The 'up' side is that I have made so really lovely friends along the way, and I suspect it has made me more outgoing. On the 'down' side - I have to discipline myself to work on my next novel first, before I go online or the time just disappears....


message 34: by [deleted user] (new)

I'm grateful for the help of my husband and daughter because I could not do all the prep for each release in the series, write, make arrangements for festivals and conventions and deal with online marketing.

We have a board in the den with 4 months worth of scheduling, divided into duties and they both have outside jobs!


message 35: by Grace (new)

Grace Elliot (httpwwwgoodreadscomgraceelliot) | 11 comments Wow! That's what I call organised!
The good thing I'd take from that Shawn, is that it sounds as though you have some excellent marketting opportunities.
How long has it taken you to build them?
Grace x


message 36: by [deleted user] (new)

Grace, just this year. My first book came out in January, the second in September. Two more are slatted for next year.

I added two more convention/festivals to attend next year. I find them more productive and beneficial than book signings. Hopefully, I can get my daughter to dress up in costume again. She was a big hit, as were the promo videos we made.

I write YA fantasy, btw. If you care to take a look, my website is . . .

http://www.allonbooks.com


message 37: by Kevin (new)

Kevin Klehr (goodreadscomkevink) | 102 comments Has anyone used http://bookblogs.ning.com/ ?

I stumbled across it and made a profile but as yet, am not sure how helpful it is or what the best way to utilise it is.


message 38: by Grace (new)

Grace Elliot (httpwwwgoodreadscomgraceelliot) | 11 comments Yep, I have a profile on Book Blogs. The jury is still out on how useful it is. The most helpful thing its done is put me in touch with some fellow bloggers when I was looking for blogs to post on for a 'blogathon.'
Apart from that I usually post a sentence or two and link to my 'main' blog when I update that twice a week.
The way I look at it is that it takes hardly any time to update and even if it brings in one or two new followers then that's time well spent.
Hope that helps,
Grace

http://graceelliot-author.blogspot.com


message 39: by Kevin (new)

Kevin Klehr (goodreadscomkevink) | 102 comments Thanks for those other tips Jack and to Grace for the pov on Book Blogs.

Something to look into in more detail.


message 40: by Grace (new)

Grace Elliot (httpwwwgoodreadscomgraceelliot) | 11 comments HI Kevin,
BRAIN WAVE!!
I looked at the stats for my blog
(http://graceelliot-author.blogspot.com )
Yesterday out of 26 visit, 3 came from the Book Blog site. This doesnt sound a lot but 3 referrals was the second most common event (most was from Facebook =8) and it equalled the number of visitors from Twitter.
NO visitors at all from Authors Den!
Interesting....
Grace x


message 41: by Kevin (new)

Kevin Klehr (goodreadscomkevink) | 102 comments Thanks Grace. I'm in the middle of a rock and a hard place at the moment. My marketing is taking time away from me writing my second book, but it's oh so necessary!


message 42: by Susan (new)

Susan Roebuck (sueroe) | 9 comments Hey Kevin - I'm in the same boat. Someone said keep your time 80/20 (80% promotion, 20% writing, or the other way round) but it's so difficult. I don't have anyone from BookBlogs - I also have difficulty posting comments on there - it won't let me! I did a Friday Giveaway Blog Hop (you can see the link on my blog: my link text) but I didn't get to work on it like I should. I got about four new followers though with the little I did.
Grace, a blogathon sounds great. I'll look into it. And thanks for the suggestions of other sites. We need this, badly.
SueX


message 43: by Susan (new)

Susan Roebuck (sueroe) | 9 comments I've had an epiphany. I'm doing it all wrong. HELP! If you go to my blog: http://lauracea.blogspot.com and do the poll, you'd help me out tons.


message 44: by Kevin (new)

Kevin Klehr (goodreadscomkevink) | 102 comments Susan wrote: "I've had an epiphany. I'm doing it all wrong. HELP! If you go to my blog: http://lauracea.blogspot.com and do the poll, you'd help me out tons."

Thanks Susan. So far I've done a Facebook ad and created a site for the book, but also made my own trailer - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xfPVMj... - sent out numerous press releases to press and bookstores, and worked hard to research blogs that might give my book away.

One thing I still have to is secure a guest spot at a festival or a reading night. There maybe something in the works but I have to wait and see.

Results - Sent out several books to interested parties, so far one review with a few more pending. My trailer is up for voting at http://yougottareadvideos.blogspot.com/. Three book giveaways including Goodreads. A wonderful interview on a genre podcast. Have even filled in questionaires for indie sites that help promote your book, but as yet, they haven't.

Still to do - More guest spots. Research new publishers who are sold via Inghram wholesalers and try to get a second edition out there more readily available. More reviews.

One of my drawbacks is that my book is available in the Northern Hemisphere and I'm at the other end of the equator.

Today I'm drafting the plotline for my novel's sequel. I've got a bit more free time now to use to my advantage.


message 45: by Susan (new)

Susan Roebuck (sueroe) | 9 comments Kevin - you're working so hard and I do hope it all works out for you. I thought about a book trailer and asked an artist I know if she'd do one. Trouble is, she charges around $200. So I asked the publisher who said they had no evidence that book trailers are worthwhile. I'm interested about the voting you got for yours. Like you I'm not in the States (where my book's sold), so that does make it more difficult. Good luck anyway.
Sue


message 46: by Grace (new)

Grace Elliot (httpwwwgoodreadscomgraceelliot) | 11 comments Kevin - making a book trailer is actually very easy.
Will a little help from my 13 year son - i had great fun making one.
I used Windows Media maker and as a technophobe I was pleasantly surprised. Definately perfectly possible to make your own.
View mine (link) on my blog.
http://graceelliot-author.blogspot.com


message 47: by Susan (new)

Susan Roebuck (sueroe) | 9 comments Oh Grace, I love your blog and only now I discover you wrote "A Dead Man's Debt" - I'm dying to read that and now I'm going to put it on my must reads. Ummm...I'm not a technophobe and can't find the trailer :-(
I see you like cats though so I'm going to follow you.
Sue


message 48: by Grace (new)

Grace Elliot (httpwwwgoodreadscomgraceelliot) | 11 comments Susan, I replied to Kevin by accident, didnt I?
I recently tidied up the blog and its now behind the half-man's face on the RHS.
So glad you're intrigued by ADMD...always glad to find another cat lover.
How are you getting on with making your trailer?


message 49: by [deleted user] (new)

Help requested from fellow authors. My year-old thriller novel could break easily into 20-30 page smaller ebooks, and I now own the copywrite. Suggestions for the fastest way to get these into the current markets? Thanks! Liam www.terminalpolicy.com


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