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Talk Genre > Discussion and New Releases! Do you love Young Adult Fiction?

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message 1: by Mandapanda (last edited Oct 14, 2010 10:08PM) (new)

Mandapanda If you love Young Adult fiction here is the place to talk about it. Great Aussie authors of YA include:

Margo Lanagan, John Marsden, Melina Marchetta, Isobelle Carmody and Sonya Hartnett. That's just a few. I'm sure there are heaps more. Post your recommendations here.

There is currently a discussion of the YA book, Genesis: The Chronicles of Rosie Black, in the Individual Book Discussion thread if you want to read it/join in. I should be finished my copy soon so if any of you guys want to read it send me a PM and I'll post it to you.


message 2: by Cheryl (new)

Cheryl (cherylllr) I love YA fiction, but in part because I can gloat that I'm *not* seventeen! Making dinner right now but I'll investigate your suggestions soon, tx.


message 3: by Carmel (new)

Carmel (CarmelF) | 5479 comments Mandy & Cheryl, I've read all of Melina's books except "Looking for Alibrandi" which I have a copy of but just haven't got to it yet, my favourite certainly was "On the Jellicoe Road" On the Jellicoe Road by Melina Marchettathis totally had me spellbound:)
As you'd know by now I'm a big fan of Cassandra Clare and also currently loving Beautiful Creatures (Caster Chronicles, #1) by Kami Garciawhich is a collaboration of Kami Gracia & Margaret Stohl & have just picked up the sequel Beautiful Darkness (Caster Chronicles, #2) by Kami Garcia. I've got the Hunger Games series by Suzanne Collins but need to read those, my daughter loved them and they're very popular. Also my daughter has just read two of Isobelle's books and said she wants to read more of hers, I think Murray recommended those one's:)Lots to read!!!
Cheers


message 4: by Kim Marie (new)

Kim Marie | 853 comments Thanks to my daughter I've discovered the YA genre recently. I was very impressed by Markus Zusak's The Book Thief and wondered why it had been given a YA classification. After reading the Modern Faerie Tale series I'm also looking forward to reading more books by Holly Black


message 5: by Mandapanda (last edited Oct 16, 2010 01:51AM) (new)

Mandapanda I was just eavesdropping on a conversation between Justin and Carmel (in the New Releases thread) on the YA age classifications.

I know when I was trying to add lots of Aussie books sold as YA into our group bookshelf it was hard to decide sometimes what went where. For me it wasn't so much the sexual innuendo that may have been present, it was more the story itself. I was amazed how many of the novels dealt with extremely dark and tragic events. Lots of abuse, suicide, loneliness etc.

I think Justin is right to question the incentive for marketing some of these books to teens (because they are a huge money market) and I think parents need to be ready to read YA books with their kids (especially with the 16 and under age group) so they can talk openly about storylines.

I know a few of the mums in this group talk about reading the books with their kids.

@ Surreality: From what I've read The Book Thief was marketed as an adult book in Australia but a YA in UK. Don't know why.


message 6: by Carmel (new)

Carmel (CarmelF) | 5479 comments Mandy wrote: "I was just eavesdropping on a conversation between Justin and Carmel (in the New Releases thread) on the YA age classifications.

I know when I was trying to add lots of Aussie books sold as YA ..."


You really hit the nail on the head Mandy. It's interesting when I go into,say for example Big W and they have the YA separate from the adult lit books, I'm astounded at some of the titles that are placed there. It even happens in my local library. I couldn't believe that they had Laurell K Hamilton's graphic novels in the YA section, as they are sexually graphic & the main character Anita is quite a busty/curvy woman. So I spoke to the librarian and they realised that a mistake had certainly been made and it was obvious that because it was in the form of a comic/grapic novel it was automatically pigeon-holed into a YA category.
I remember reading (yes, I admit it, Twilight series) and asking my daughter whether she thought the category of YA for that was suitable considering in the US that was from age 13 and she said "Mum I wouldn't let my 13 year old read this, it's to mature for that age" and I think she was 16 at the time.
I really believe it's all about the dollar which is a shame as surely we have a duty of care to our children! Interesting subject, this one!
Cheers


message 7: by [deleted user] (new)

I like to read the books my kids are reading. I find it tough to identify age appropriate books for my daughter she is 13 and goes through books at a furious rate. It's fortunate that one of the local book shops (the one I posted the photo of) specializes in children’s books. It's good to go in there and talk to the assistants. It gives you a bit of comfort.


message 8: by Mandapanda (new)

Mandapanda Laurell K Hamilton is SO not YA! Graphic novels are a fast growing market (influenced by the success of manga and anime). But they are more for adults I think. More and more writers of popular adult book series are using that format. Sherrilyn Kenyon is another author who's publishing her Dark Hunter series in graphic novel form. They are a lot of fun but again just cause it's a comic doesn't mean it's for young kids.


message 9: by Carmel (new)

Carmel (CarmelF) | 5479 comments Gail, I also think it's a great bonding thing to have with your child. I know for my daughter and I we have developed a stronger relationship because of this common interest having lengthy conversations about characters and themes, it's fantastic:)
Cheers


message 10: by Carmel (new)

Carmel (CarmelF) | 5479 comments Mandy wrote: "Laurell K Hamilton is SO not YA! Graphic novels are a fast growing market (influenced by the success of manga and anime). But they are more for adults I think. More and more writers of popular adul..."

So you know why I kicked up a fuss. It was quite interesting when I first brought it up with the librarian she said she'd follow it up with the person in charge of setting the category, I think it was a few weeks down the track and I thought I'd check to see if they had acted on what they promised. As you can imagine I was a little annoyed when nothing had been done, so I spoke to them again and the librarian was a little disappointed nothing had happened so she went about ensuring the category was altered and as far as I know they're in the adult section. I'm sure though if I went to the library next week I'd find plenty more adult style magna/comic books in the YA section, but I suppose you have to be able to have faith in the decision makers that they'll do the right thing, can't be watching over their shoulder all the time!
Cheers


message 11: by Carmel (new)

Carmel (CarmelF) | 5479 comments Justin said:Oh Carmel, what you have said does not deter me in the least, in fact I'm delighted you agree with me. My characters are aged 18 to ~30, however, I decided to give one of the 18 yo's a mindset of a 16yo, so to introduce the quaintness and innocence of a mid teen groping with loneliness and typical heartfelt desires. You might like to read the excerpt from Chapters 18/19 on my site. Don't worry, it's a clean read and may be similar to Cassie's writings. I've enjoyed this chat with you and hope you will enjoy the read.
Regards, Justin

I'll certainly do that Justin and maybe read a little more, I'm an adventurous girl you know, ha:)
Cheers


message 12: by Justin (new)

Justin South (justinsouth) | 43 comments Carmel wrote: "Justin said:Oh Carmel, what you have said does not deter me in the least, in fact I'm delighted you agree with me. My characters are aged 18 to ~30, however, I decided to give one of the 18 yo's a ..."

Adventurous, I see. Well, I'll wait to see if I hear from you again. Lol. It seems the issue of YA ages is a concern among readers and in the market place. Like so many things, there is no doubt in my mind, YA lit is greed driven by the marketers and all sellers and lenders should preview the content of 'YA' categorised lit to determine it's correct shelving. If the marketers don't care, they stand at risk of the Government, maybe, one day applying the rating system to YA lit. Cheers


message 13: by Carmel (new)

Carmel (CarmelF) | 5479 comments I'm with you Justin & now I will read your work:) It's been lovely talking with you and I will give you some feedback and don't worry I'll be gentle:)
Cheers


message 14: by Hayley (new)

Hayley Lau Yep I'm a fan of YA, they often seem more accessible than adult fiction, and when I've dabbled in writing, it's been for the YA audience.

Has anyone heard of 16-year-old Aussie author Steph Bowe? Her first YA book was just released this year and I'm wanting to get my mitts on it - it's called Girl Saves Boy.

I followed her wonderful blog for a while, she was named a Triple J's Under 25er "smashing it" in their field. She's one to watch.


message 15: by Carmel (new)

Carmel (CarmelF) | 5479 comments Hayley wrote: "Yep I'm a fan of YA, they often seem more accessible than adult fiction, and when I've dabbled in writing, it's been for the YA audience.

Has anyone heard of 16-year-old Aussie author Steph Bowe? ..."


Hi Hayley, I haven't heard of her but by the look of GR's she averages a pretty good rating for a debut book, one to look out for as you say:)
Cheers


message 16: by Mandapanda (new)

Mandapanda Hayley wrote: "Has anyone heard of 16-year-old Aussie author Steph Bowe? ..."

Thanks for the recommendation Hayley! Always glad to hear from people who've read and enjoyed a book.:)


message 17: by Cheryl (new)

Cheryl (cherylllr) I'm discussing this issue of mature themes in YA lit in another group and folks definitely have different reactions. I'm in favor of a MG (middle grades) classification for ages 11 to 14 or so but it seems to be used only by some school libraries.

Teens are, I've been told by teachers, often drawn to the darker and more mature works because they're in the process of learning about the reality of the world that they're going to be entering soon - but I'd rather that 14 and unders don't read those yet.

Best bet, everyone agrees, is to keep an eye on your kids, and read (or at least skim) what they're reading, no matter how old they are! If you can discuss it with them, so much the better. :)


message 18: by Mandapanda (new)

Mandapanda Here's a msg from group member Nomes:

Hey :)

I'm only just figuring out getting around here (apart from setting up my own shelves :)

I set up a list for people to vote on for our Favourite Aussie YA Books of all time. I chucked up a heap of books from my shelves that I love but it'd be cool if people had more they could add their faves as there's a lot more goodness that isn't on there (such as Gabriel Nix - whom I haven't read yet but I've heard his brilliant, and Isobelle Carmody, Anthony Eaton, Kristy Murray, and I'm sure loads more.

PLus I only can put up a max of 100 - And I've read loads more than that ;)

Even if you'd like to vote on what's there it's be awesome - kind of like our own Aussie top books for teens :)

Favourite Aussie YA Books


message 19: by Cheryl (new)

Cheryl (cherylllr) Even more additions to my to-read shelf....


message 20: by Tracey (new)

Tracey Alley (TraceyA) | 485 comments My older sister has two teenage girls who are both voracious readers and have been since they were six or seven but she always checks out the content herself first because some books, as has been mentioned, are labelled YA when they are definitely not. I think since Harry Potter was such a huge cross-market success that a lot of writers and publishers are eager to try and capture both markets.

I can recommend Maisy Mayby Aussie author Naomi Kramer as a good mid-level teen book and Jason Lett's, not an Aussie, has written a great series The Synthesis that is also YA.

My own books have been read by an older teen audience and they've enjoyed it so I've labelled it as YA appropriate but I think all parents should be keeping an eye on what their kids are reading - better to be safe than sorry


message 21: by Mandapanda (last edited Nov 06, 2010 11:47PM) (new)

Mandapanda Teenagers have their say

The shortlist for the 2010 Inkys has been announced. The teenage literature awards are run by the State Library of Victoria's Inside a Dog website and voted for online by readers.

There is the Golden Inky for an Australian book, the Silver Inky for an international book, and the Creative Reading Prize for a young person's creative response to a book they love.

Voting closes November 9. Awards ceremony, November 25. Details at The INKYS

Going Bovine by Libba Bray
When Cameron finds out he's sick and going to die, he embarks on the mother of all road trips through a twisted America to find out how to live and what matters most.

Guardian of the Dead by Karen Healey
A gripping fantasy set on the shifting boundary between what is real and what is legend. Can Ellie discover a power she never knew she possessed?

Leviathan by Scott Westerfeld
Aleksandar Ferdinand, prince of the Austro-Hungarian Empire, is on the run. His own people have turned against him. All he has is a small, loyal crew of men.

Liar by Justine Larbalestier
Micah Wilkins admits she's a liar. But will murder be enough of a reason to stop lying? An extraordinary and original story that will have you grasping for the truth until the very last page.

Raw Blue by Kirsty Eagar
Set in Sydney's northern beaches, Raw Blue traces Carly's story as she recovers from the traumatic events of schoolies week two years earlier. A must-read for older teens.

Shiver by Maggie Stiefvater
For years, Grace has watched the wolves in the woods behind her house. One yellow-eyed wolf-her wolf-is a chilling presence she can't seem to live without.

The Sky is Everywhere by Jandy Nelson
Seventeen-year-old Lennie Walker, bookworm and band geek, plays second clarinet and spends her time tucked safely and happily in the shadow of her fiery older sister, Bailey.

Stolen by Lucy Christopher
Told in a letter to her captor by 16-year-old Gemma, Stolen explores the influence that a really wild and remote space can have on the inner development of a young woman.

Swerve by Phillip Gwyne
One of the country's finest young cellists, 16 year-old Hugh Twycross has a very bright future. A future that has been mapped out by his parents, his teachers, by everybody, it seems, except Hugh Twycross.

Will Grayson, Will Grayson by David Levithan and John Green
One cold night, in a most unlikely corner of Chicago, two teens—both named Will Grayson—are about to cross paths.

Going Bovine by Libba Bray Guardian of the Dead by Karen Healey Leviathan (Leviathan, #1) by Scott Westerfeld Liar by Justine Larbalestier Raw Blue by Kirsty Eagar Shiver (The Wolves of Mercy Falls, #1) by Maggie Stiefvater The Sky Is Everywhere by Jandy Nelson Stolen A letter to my captor by Lucy Christopher Swerve by Phillip Gwynne Will Grayson, Will Grayson by John Green


message 22: by Angela (new)

Angela (dilaby) You know they call all these vamp, were and angel books YA novels, but I don't think the authors realise that us older crew love to read them too. Infact, since Twilight (yes the dreaded 'T' word, LOL) YA novels have grown in popularity in the older generation so much. I'm only 32 but I relive my younger views reading these books. They make you younger reading them, make you fall in love for the first time again and again. I spoke to a lady in Kmart the other day who looked about 70 and she was yacking to me about how she loves them all. So you are never too old to read them. :D


message 23: by [deleted user] (new)

Do they call them YA so we know they are safe to choose for teens to read? I find it difficult to find appropriate things for my daughter to read. I look to the YA books for help.


message 24: by Angela (new)

Angela (dilaby) I think the YA novels are a lot safer for teens. They have romance but don't go into the hot and heavy stuff. Some of them also seem to involve teen issues, and not just the easy ones. Some can be harsh and uncomfortable issues, like abuse, rape etc. Again they don't go into great detail, but I have read some that mention these things. I know it can be worrying to let your kids read this type of stuff but it is out there and truthfully, I think there are times when we need to unwrap the bubblewrap we put around our kids. The love triangles are a popular theme in YA novels too, but who doesn't love a good love triangle. Books are a good escape and increase the imagination, so when my two get to the right age they will be allowed to read their mum's YA collection. LOL


message 25: by [deleted user] (new)

My daughter is only 13 so I'm still trying to preserve her innocents, probably more for my benefit than hers. She is growing up so fast. (Literally, she has grown 3 inches in the last month or so.)


message 26: by Carmel (new)

Carmel (CarmelF) | 5479 comments Gail "cyborg" wrote: "My daughter is only 13 so I'm still trying to preserve her innocents, probably more for my benefit than hers. She is growing up so fast. (Literally, she has grown 3 inches in the last month or so.)"

I certainly think books like Twilight & even Cassandra Clare's series should be read by 15 yrs & up. I certainly felt (& I'm sure I've already commented previously) that the themes in at least the Twilight series were to mature for what is classified in the US as YA. It's a marketers dream, money, money , money!
Cheers


message 27: by Cheryl (new)

Cheryl (cherylllr) My son is 14. I agree that there's a big gray area between protecting a child's innocence and wrapping her in bubblewrap. There are lots of good books for 'middle grades' but the trick is to find them.

A couple of other groups I belong to help, and it helps that I read most books before my son sees them. However, he just came home asking me to get Leviathan from the library and I've no interest in it - I hope it's ok for him! Have any of you read it?


message 28: by Carmel (new)

Carmel (CarmelF) | 5479 comments Cheryl wrote: " There are lots of good books for 'middle grades' but the trick is to find...However, he just came home asking me to get Leviathan from the library and I've no interest in it - I hope it's ok for him! Have any of you read it?
"


Cheryl, I agree that finding the correct age appropriate book for your child can take a little searching, but I'm sure there are plenty out there. My daughter who is a little older than your son attempted to read Leviathan but found the speampunk genre didn't suit her style of book to read, but that being said, I have heard plenty of good reports on this book (ratings are favourable also.)Perhaps have a read of those GR reviews to gauge whether you think it's appropriate. Certainly in the Cassandra Clare google group I'm in, many have said Leviathan was well written and worth having in your reading list:)
Cheers


message 29: by Jenny (new)

Jenny | 114 comments Gail said: 'Do they call them YA so we know they are safe to choose for teens to read?'

That's pretty much it, Gail. Publishers are incredibly anal when it comes to kids' and YA fiction, which is, in part, why I put all mine on hold to tackle an adult novel. When my YA novel, The Ice-cream Man went through editing - 5 editors, would you believe! - you would not believe all the hoo-ha over every little thing that might upset someone. Talk about writing in a strait-jacket! Most of my teen characters' language had to be modified; it's a wonder any of them sound real.

The main reason for this attitude is that the biggest buyers of kids' fiction in this country are school librarians and for the most part they are as straight as they come with regard to their charges' reading matter. However, for the big-wigs among us, John Marsden for one, anything seems to go. I'm all for equality for all, so this aspect of publishing drives me to despair at times.


message 30: by Naomi (new)

Naomi Kramer (nomesque) | 66 comments Gail "cyborg" wrote: "Do they call them YA so we know they are safe to choose for teens to read? I find it difficult to find appropriate things for my daughter to read. I look to the YA books for help."

I think YA, at its heart, is simply a collection of books with teen main character(s), written primarily for teens to read.

I wrote Maisy May with teens in mind, knowing full well that the subject matter might turn parents off. It's not, in my opinion, anything a teen shouldn't read - a bit of swearing, some descriptive but not steamy 'sex' scenes, questioning of standard morality and authority. In other words, stuff that most teens are thoroughly involved in. But when asked, I do suggest that parents read it first. Many people don't share my opinions on what makes suitable YA reading.

YA authors do have more responsibility on their shoulders, though. If you aim for realism, for example, it's got to be carried through. No sex/drugs/passivity/stupidity with a magic happy-ever-after.


message 31: by [deleted user] (new)

Naomi wrote: "No sex/drugs/passivity/stupidity with a magic happy-ever-after. "

All YA have to have a happy-ever-after?


message 32: by Carmel (new)

Carmel (CarmelF) | 5479 comments Naomi wrote: "But when asked, I do suggest that parents read it first. Many people don't share my opinions on what makes suitable YA reading.
.."


Naomi, I've found that having read many of the books my youngest daughter (she's now 18) has read, has had a wonderful bonding affect to our relationship. It's opened up so many discussions between us about teens & their challenges, eg bullying, friendships, values, fears, etc.
I gather it would be extremely difficult to find a happy medium as a writer broaching these subjects without pushing the boundaries into what is perhaps too mature for the lower age group amongst YA readers. I don't envy your task, as it's hard enough being a parent of one, let alone writing for one!
Cheers


message 33: by Naomi (new)

Naomi Kramer (nomesque) | 66 comments Gail "cyborg" wrote: "Naomi wrote: "No sex/drugs/passivity/stupidity with a magic happy-ever-after. "

All YA have to have a happy-ever-after?"


Sorry, what I was trying to say is: if your characters are indulging in all sorts of dangerous behaviour in the interests of 'keeping it real', it's more important in YA to make sure that some sort of realistic consequences happen. Not in a 'you stuff up, you die horribly' object lesson kind of way, mind. Just - not glamourising stupidity, or reinforcing in your audience the idea that nothing bad can ever happen to them, I guess. Make sense?


message 34: by [deleted user] (new)

Yep, sorry, got it. I was just reading it wrong, it makes sense now. :)


message 35: by Naomi (new)

Naomi Kramer (nomesque) | 66 comments Carmel wrote: "I gather it would be extremely difficult to find a happy medium as a writer broaching these subjects without pushing the boundaries into what is perhaps too mature for the lower age group amongst YA readers. I don't envy your task, as it's hard enough being a parent of one, let alone writing for one!"

Yup. Although I have it easier than many, in a sense - I'm not writing for print or for a publisher, so I don't need to worry about conforming to specific rules. I write that series for older teens, and base it on what I'd be comfortable with my own teen reading - and what I would've liked to read at that age. :-)


message 36: by Carmel (new)

Carmel (CarmelF) | 5479 comments Naomi wrote: "I write that series for older teens, and base it on what I'd be comfortable with my own teen reading - and what I would've liked to read at that age. :-)..."

I'll have to check them out Naomi:)
Cheers


message 37: by Jenny (new)

Jenny | 114 comments Gail said: 'All YA have to have a happy-ever-after?'

A: Unless you're John Marsden.


message 38: by Mandapanda (new)

Mandapanda The winner of the Prime Minister's Literary Award for YA fiction (announced on Nov. 8th) is Confessions of a Liar, Thief and Failed Sex God.

Confessions of a Liar, Thief and Failed Sex God by Bill Condon


message 39: by Christine (new)

Christine | 27 comments I am 24 and I absolutely love YA Fiction. I (along with millions of others at the moment) am really enjoying all the new vampire, werewolf, angel books.

I havent come across many aussie authors though so thanks for the suggestions!

My favourites at the moment are the Cassandra Clare books, house of night series, vampire academy, Eragon books.

I thought the Isobelle Carmody books were fantastic - I am waiting for the last books of hers to come out. I am glad I am only just reading them - I can't imagine having to wait years for a series to finish! :)

I do agree with what people are saying about the YA/adult classification. It seems like it is all getting muddled.


message 40: by Carmel (new)

Carmel (CarmelF) | 5479 comments Christine wrote: "My favourites at the moment are the Cassandra Clare books
I havent come across many aussie authors though so thanks for the suggestions!..."


Christine, love Cassie's books also:) Can I suggest to you if you haven't read Melina Marchetta has some great aussie YA books, my favourite being On The Jellicoe Road by Melina Marchetta and also for more mature reads Saving Francesca by Melina Marchetta & sequel The Piper's Son by Melina Marchetta.
Cheers


message 41: by Mandapanda (new)

Mandapanda Christine wrote: "I havent come across many aussie authors though so thanks for the suggestions!..."

Check out our YA shelf in the Aussie Readers bookshelf too!

http://www.goodreads.com/group/booksh...


message 42: by Janelle (new)

Janelle | 37 comments I am definitely in a YA reading season at the moment, I can't get enough of them. Some stand out books I've been devouring include:
Raw Blue by Kirsty Eagar, The Sky Is Everywhere by Jandy Nelson, If I Stay (If I Stay, #1) by Gayle Forman - just to name a few.


message 43: by Cheryl (new)

Cheryl (cherylllr) Usually one of the reasons I love YA is because they tend to be more concise (read, 'short' :). However, I was recently persuaded to read a huge book, first of a trilogy, called. The Name of the Wind. Marketed usually to adults, I think it'd be wonderful for any adventurous reader age 15 up. Believe it or not, over 600 pp and not one wasted word. Wonderful story, characters, world, concepts.... I recommend it to anyone who's enjoyed Harry Potter, or Narnia, or just about any fantasy or fairy tale.


message 44: by Carmel (new)

Carmel (CarmelF) | 5479 comments Cheryl wrote: "Wonderful story, characters, world, concepts.... I recommend it to anyone who's enjoyed Harry Potter, or Narnia, or just about any fantasy or fairy tale. ..."

I've got this on my TBR list but certainly intend for me daughter to read it, I think she would love it going by the synopsis of the novel.
Cheers


message 45: by Cheryl (new)

Cheryl (cherylllr)


message 46: by Cheryl (new)

Cheryl (cherylllr) I put it on my wishlist, Stephanie.


message 47: by Carmel (new)

Carmel (CarmelF) | 5479 comments Cheryl wrote: "I put it on my wishlist, Stephanie."

So did I Cheryl/Stephanie, my list of books to read is going quickly!!
Cheers


message 48: by Tahlia (new)

Tahlia Newland (tahliaN) | 90 comments I like YA fantasy because the storylines aren't as convoluted as adult fantasy and they're mostly set, at least partially in the real world. That makes them easier to realte to.

I think there should be two categories. One for teens (ie 13-17) and one for young adults (18 plus) . We need to have a line where the more adult themes come in. There's a big difference between the 13-15 yr age group and the 16-17 age group.


Cassandra Clare is my favorite YA author. Some say I write like her too. What a great compliment.


message 49: by Carmel (new)

Carmel (CarmelF) | 5479 comments Tahlia, I so agree with you re the splitting of the youth reading groups. So much is happening to children's brains during that growing period, can be a bit of a nightmare for parents to provide the appropriate level for their children. Standardising YA age levels is a long way off though, as marketing/money rules the roost!
Glad to see another Cassie Clare fan, love her series and apparently she's coming to Aust in April next year when COFA's comes out.
Cheers


message 50: by Janelle (new)

Janelle | 37 comments Just finished Beatle meets Destiny by Gabrielle Williams today - 5 stars! Another great Aussie YA fiction for the bookshelf :)


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