Banned Books discussion

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General Questions About Banned And Challenged Books

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message 1: by Alyson Leigh (new)

Alyson Leigh (alyleigh123) | 2 comments This sounds like a wonderful group to be in. The book The Color Purple is a wonderful book I have read it and it is very good. Nave you read any. Books about the holocaust people seem to think they should be banned as well. They don't want people to be able to read them because the say it never happened. This is sad. There are people who lived through it but there aren't very many. I thin, rose would be great books to read. One of the ones I rad in school was number the stars. Please take this into consideration, thanks,

- Alyson


message 2: by Lori (new)

Lori (tyme2read) | 6 comments Alyson, I have just started to read books about the halolcaust in the past year. It is a topic I find difficult but I am glad I have started to read them. I just finished The Little Coat : The Bob and Sue Elliott Story, it was a good read and the closest to hit home for me yet as my grandparents were from Holland and never talked about it.


message 3: by Kelly H. (Maybedog), Big Kahuna, Ministry of Illicit Reading (new)

Kelly H. (Maybedog) (maybedog) | 623 comments Mod
I agree with you Grizzly Luver. It is very disturbing when people ban books for any reason but particularly to cover up something so horrific as the Holocaust.


message 4: by Pam (new)

Pam Williams I just found this group and I'm very interested in takes on banned books. I work in a middle school library and we are looking into having a book club for 8th graders featuring banned books.


message 5: by Wes, Grand Poobah, Ministry of Controversial Materials (new)

Wes (pricerightbooks) | 33 comments Mod
How do you determine a band book that is OK for them to read? Like would you let them read Lolita?


message 6: by Barbara (new)

Barbara Vazquez | 1 comments How does this banning work? In my country, Spain, we have nothing like that, except for those on the Catholic Church list, and nobody cares about it.


message 7: by Amanda (new)

Amanda M. Lyons (amandamlyons) Wes wrote: "How do you determine a band book that is OK for them to read? Like would you let them read Lolita?"

I'd say one should be at least 16 before they read Lolita. Its not as offensive as you'd think but I can see a younger kid being wierded out by it. Belinda by Anne Rice has a similar plot and kind of comes off better actually.


message 8: by Kelly H. (Maybedog), Big Kahuna, Ministry of Illicit Reading (new)

Kelly H. (Maybedog) (maybedog) | 623 comments Mod
Lolita is so complex that I don't think most people let alone children understand the subtext and subtle humor. I didn't get the majority of those things until I read the annotated version. But having done so, I think it's a masterpiece. No offense to Anne Rice but I doubt her book is a masterpiece. But it probably is a lot more accessible than Lolita.


message 9: by Lena (new)

Lena | 9 comments I doubt 8th graders would really understand Lolita. I'm surprised how many adults insist this is a love story, or that Lolita herself initiated or was somehow to blame for her stepfather being a sexual predator. So...I'm not sure kid's would understand that Herbert Humphrey is an unreliable narrator and therefore you can't believe the things he says.

There are lots of banned books that kids read in school--I had to read Catcher in the Rye which was banned for a long time. There are plenty of classic books for young people that were banned that a school would probably choose for 8th graders. I even heard that Speak by Laurie Halse Anderson is on banned book lists--I really think more kids should read that book. And it's very accessible.


message 10: by Kelly H. (Maybedog), Big Kahuna, Ministry of Illicit Reading (new)

Kelly H. (Maybedog) (maybedog) | 623 comments Mod
Barbara wrote: "How does this banning work? In my country, Spain, we have nothing like that, except for those on the Catholic Church list, and nobody cares about it."

I'm so sorry I missed this question. This group covers censorship all over the world but we do primarily talk about the challenging and banning of books in the US. Generally what happens nowadays is that a parent gets upset that their child has access to a book they deem inappropriate, usually in a library or school. They then complain to the governing bodies. Sometimes this works, usually it doesn't. I think it happens everywhere but we Americans are such media-hogs that everything is blown up into something huge and people like these censors get a lot more attention than they deserve and schools buckle to avoid negative publicity.


Awesomevegan (AKA JenReads) (awesomevegan) | 4 comments I am pretty new to reading banned/challenged books but I want to read a lot more of them. I read some in high school but more recently I have read:
Speak by Laurie Halse Anderson
Looking for Alaska by John Green
I am also working my way through the Harry Potter series.
I don't know if Alaska was a large scale banning or challenge but I know at least one school had a problem with a certain scene in it. I consider some of these books more appropriate for an older teen who would know about all this stuff already anyway. It is up to parents to know what their kids are reading. If anyone is interested John Green made a video talking about Alaska.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fHMPtY...

I hope posting the link is okay. If not please let me know! Also am looking for recommendations of banned and challenged Young Adult, middle grade, children's books both modern and classics. I know the names of many but would to know what people think of them!


message 12: by David (new)

David | 9 comments Awesomevegan (AKA JenReads) wrote: "I am pretty new to reading banned/challenged books but I want to read a lot more of them. I read some in high school but more recently I have read:
Speak by [author:Laurie Halse Ander..."


I've got no problems with a link. I happen to agree with it and believe it has solid arguments.


Awesomevegan (AKA JenReads) (awesomevegan) | 4 comments David wrote: "Awesomevegan (AKA JenReads) wrote: "I am pretty new to reading banned/challenged books but I want to read a lot more of them. I read some in high school but more recently I have read:
[book:Speak|4..."


Thank you. I love John Green. Both of those brothers are probably some of the most intelligent men on YouTube. He is so smart and just makes so much sense. I read all but one of his books so far and I am excited for the next one. I think Alaska was the only one that has been challenged. If I am wrong feel free to correct me. Are any of the banned books on the group bookshelf a good match for me? I like John Green, young adult books, coming of age, self discovery, young love themes. I also enjoy dystopia and youth challenging the society norms. I enjoy nerdy main characters who feel like they don't quite fit in. Those are the characters I can connect with best. Thank you for this group! :)


message 14: by Donald (new)

Donald Armfield | 2 comments New to The group. Why band books if you don't like it then read something else. BAH!


Awesomevegan (AKA JenReads) (awesomevegan) | 4 comments Donald wrote: "New to The group. Why band books if you don't like it then read something else. BAH!"

We all agree with you! Welcome to the group. Do you have any favorite banned or challenged books you have read?


message 16: by Donald (new)

Donald Armfield | 2 comments Not sure if any of the books I have read. Have been banned or challenged


message 17: by Lisa (new)

Lisa James (sthwnd) Well, you can check to see if they have been by looking at various banned book web sites. This one was an eye opener:

http://www.onlinecollegedegrees.org/2...

This one is done by a publisher:

http://www.adlerbooks.com/banned.html


message 18: by Matt (new)

Matt | 2 comments I can honestly say I haven't laughed as hard as I did in a long time when I saw Fahrenheit 451 on a banned book list. Don't they see the the irony in censoring a book that deals with censoring books... classic.

People who make these decisions about what is a so-called banned book need to get their heads out of the sand. The majority of the books listed are more about not letting young children read them, than what negative affect they will have on the populace at large. Proper parenting should be all that is needed to eliminate these lists.


message 19: by [deleted user] (new)

I have been working to let the hunger games be aloud in libraries in elementary schools I read it in elementary and it still is my favorite book


message 20: by Amberly (new)

Amberly (introverted22) | 7 comments One of my favorite authors is Ellen Hopkins and I find it sad that parents don't want their teens reading her books when all she wants to do is help teach teens the dangers of drugs and sex. Parents don't realize that books for children and teens are meant to be as realistic as possible so we understand that people are going through what we are going through too. Ellen's books have helped me through so much and to ban them just because you don't want your child to know about these things is unrealistic. They probably already know about them anyway.

A great video of authors speaking about free speech:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WjpR0R...


message 21: by David (new)

David | 9 comments Right on, Amber! I am with you 100 percent. We need to trust our kids / teens with information and possibly help explain complex situations. Book banners think they are protecting their kids? Well the reality is that people grow up and become part of the world, and the better educated they are w/r/t different topics, the better decision makers they will become as they run into tricky situations in life. (At least that is my idealistic world view.)


message 22: by Amberly (new)

Amberly (introverted22) | 7 comments At the age of 13 my father started to trust me with books. I picked up the first book in the Gossip Girl series and saw how much sex and drinking was in it and told myself that it was a book I should read when I get older because I didn't understand much and found it gross. Most children and teens know what they should and shouldnt be reading and banning it is just going to make them want to read it more!


message 23: by Amberly (new)

Amberly (introverted22) | 7 comments I should have probably mentioned that I picked it up first when I was 13 and reread it at like age 15. It's actually pretty amazing how just a few years can mean all the difference.


message 24: by Clara (new)

Clara Lena wrote: "I doubt 8th graders would really understand Lolita. I'm surprised how many adults insist this is a love story, or that Lolita herself initiated or was somehow to blame for her stepfather being a se..."

I had to read that my freshman year of high school, though I had read it a few years prior to that


message 25: by Rachel (new)

Rachel | 18 comments Hi all! New to the group but very interested in the topic. Hoping to get to The Catcher in the Rye some time this year. Read 100 Banned Books: Censorship Histories of World Literature a while ago. A very good reference for why some past books have been banned.


message 26: by [deleted user] (new)

So, hi everyone. I want to read Mein Kampf this year. Don't think I am a Nazi or anything but I think this is just one of those books you have to read once in a lifetime. Just like the Bible, or the Origin of Species. I got the book digital but yesterday I printed it (886 pages!) because I don't like reading from a screen. Mein Kampf is the only book in the Netherlands (where I live) that you aren't allowed to sell. Read it is ok, and sharing it with others is also ok, but selling it isn't ok. I don't support Hitler's ideas but I am just interested in how this man decided to do what he did.


message 27: by Cindy III (new)

Cindy III Aurelia wrote: "So, hi everyone. I want to read Mein Kampf this year. Don't think I am a Nazi or anything but I think this is just one of those books you have to read once in a lifetime. Just like the Bible, or th..."


I wouldn't think that. I'm interested in reading it too. Problem is finding the time. My English teacher mentioned this book and said it explains how he was able to do what he did.


message 28: by Susan (new)

Susan Ashcraft (sashcraft) | 11 comments Main Kampf is worth the time to read. It's unsettling but I've never understood why it's been banned...but then I don't like being told what I can can't read. The holocaust is horrible but it happened and banning Mein Kampf isn't going to change that .


message 29: by Rachel (new)

Rachel | 18 comments My friend in high school mentioned reading Mein Kampf for the same reasons but got paranoid it would get her put on some sort of government watch list. Remember, she was in high school. I think it's important to understand the past so that we don't repeat it.


message 30: by Susan (new)

Susan Ashcraft (sashcraft) | 11 comments I agree!


message 31: by [deleted user] (new)

Well, good to hear people who support me. Rachel, I recognize the feelings your friend had. I want to go to New York next month and therefore I don't dare to read the book now, afraid that maybe 'they' find out and I won't get a visum. Bit paranoid, but still. Good to hear I can freely tell I am going to read this book


message 32: by Vanessa (new)

Vanessa | 7 comments LOL, that's a funny story Rachel, although I do understand your friend's paranoia :) Aurelia, lots of people have read Mein Kampf, as I'm sure you will find out when you read the reviews for it here and elsewhere. I haven't had a chance to read it myself since my TBR list is really long, but you have nothing to worry about, because, like I said, people of all walks of life have read that book for many purposes.


message 33: by Carolyn (new)

Carolyn Vana (goodreadscomcarolyn_vana) | 2 comments I am new to the site and stumbled upon your discussion as I am writing a paper for my Access to Information class about censorship of books in public schools. Any insights or incidents you may know of would be welcome and appreciated!
For me banning a book is a green light to reading it!


message 34: by Rachel (new)

Rachel | 18 comments Carolyn, may i ask where you are going to school?


message 35: by Ruby (last edited Apr 27, 2012 02:00PM) (new)

Ruby Emam (goodreadscomruby_emam) I recommend
The Little Black Fish. This book is for Young Adults and progressives and it is about freedom and justice and shows a path to achieve those goals. Here is a part of the will of a Kurdish freedom-fighter in Iran, Farzad Kamangar (published in Washington Times under the title: Iran hangs a little fish)

QUOTE:
In his final letter from prison, Mr. Kamangar related the Iranian story “The Little Black Fish,” written in 1967 by the dissident teacher Samad Behrangi, which tells the story of a little fish who defies the rules of his community to embark on a journey to discover the sea. Through many adventures, the little black fish finds freedom, but also an untimely death. “Is it possible to be a teacher and not show the path to the sea to the little fish of the country?” he wrote. “Is it possible to carry the heavy burden of being a teacher and be responsible for spreading the seeds of knowledge and still be silent? Is it possible to see the lumps in the throats of the students and witness their thin and malnourished faces and keep quiet? … I cannot imagine witnessing the pain and poverty of the people of this land and fail to give our hearts to the river and the sea, to the roar and the flood.”
UNQUOTE

& a link: http://www.washingtontimes.com/news/2...


message 36: by Susan (new)

Susan Ashcraft (sashcraft) | 11 comments I read the editorial and was incredibly moved. I have added The Little Black Fish as a to-read. I'm very interested in reading the book.


message 37: by Ruby (new)

Ruby Emam (goodreadscomruby_emam) I am looking forward to your comments.


message 38: by Susan (new)

Susan Ashcraft (sashcraft) | 11 comments I read the Little Black Fish. The story is very strong and really pushes the aspects of thinking for yourself, and doing for yourself; as well as questioning those in authority. I can certainly see why some (and I do mean just some) people, religions, governments and so forth would have a real big problem with this. Honestly I think it is powerful piece of work. I really think this is a story worth reading.


message 39: by Ruby (new)

Ruby Emam (goodreadscomruby_emam) HI, Susan. Thanks for your comments. Did you guess who The Little Black Fish was?


message 40: by Ljubica (new)

Ljubica (ljubicatodorovic) | 3 comments Re: Mein Kampf. I have Mein Kampf on my bookshelf and have read bits of it here and there over the years (I have not been able to just sit down and read the whole thing). I consider it a very long "rant", I must say. Much of it is very hard to tolerate... Hitler's hatred for certain peoples and certain things is very unnerving and sad; however, I don't think it is fair to ban the "book" just because of the opinions held within. It is a piece of (horrible) human history and it should be something we can all access... if only to understand what a madman writes/thinks about.


message 41: by Susan (new)

Susan Ashcraft (sashcraft) | 11 comments Ljubica wrote: "Re: Mein Kampf. I have Mein Kampf on my bookshelf and have read bits of it here and there over the years (I have not been able to just sit down and read the whole thing). I consider it a very long ..."

Thats why I read it, I wanted to try and understand how someone could hate as much as he did. And while it is definitely a rant, there were certain areas where I could almost feel the lure he would have had...it really creeped me out! He really knew how to play to an audience.


message 42: by Ljubica (new)

Ljubica (ljubicatodorovic) | 3 comments Susan wrote: "Ljubica wrote: "Re: Mein Kampf. I have Mein Kampf on my bookshelf and have read bits of it here and there over the years (I have not been able to just sit down and read the whole thing). I consider..."

Yes, I do agree... sometimes, it seemed as though he had good ideas on how to run a country... but then the horrible stuff would creep in (like the hatreds of people & things) and I would be scratching my head thinking, "Why?"


message 43: by Mary (new)

Mary Lowry (mlowry57) | 2 comments I am new to this group. I have so many books on my list to read right now, but I know a few of them are on the Banned Book List. This list, by the way, is compiled by the American Library Association. Books are put on the list because they have been challenged in a community or school. It is amazing to read the books that have been put on this list over the years. When Harry Potter was first published, it made the list!


message 44: by Susan (new)

Susan Ashcraft (sashcraft) | 11 comments Welcome to the group Mary. It really is amazing to see what books have made the list and the reasons why.


message 45: by Ruby (new)

Ruby Emam (goodreadscomruby_emam) Hi, everyone. I would like to inform you that my second book which is also a translation of another one of Samad behrangi’s banned books, is now available on Kindle.
"24 Hours Between Dream & Reality" is an intriguing story for all ages, which has many underlying political messages for progressive readers. It focuses on the need for an educational system that would orient children within their own world enabling them to play a useful part to take a lead in solving their problems. It is filled with hope, stamina for life, need for education and awareness; portraying realities of life.
It is also an in-depth study of unemployment and the devastating impact of financial problems in the lives of children.
The reason behind banning of this book is that it shows a path to freedom, equality and justice.
http://www.amazon.com/dp/B007XINRWU


message 46: by Drakonflight (new)

Drakonflight | 1 comments Hello! I'm new and introducing myself. I think its interesting to find out what books have been banned and why.


message 47: by L (new)

L (dochavock) | 4 comments Greetings All,

I too am new and introducing myself. I have piles of books for fun but feel I need to read other books of more substance on occasion and would like to join the group in learning what books are banned and read and discuss them with you guys.

What book are you reading next?

LMS


message 48: by Jordan (new)

Jordan Connell (tinkerer) | 1 comments I am also new. I read a book that was banned at my school, A Child Called It. It was really an interesting book.


message 49: by Teresa (new)

Teresa | 1 comments A Child Called It was banned?! Agreed, the events and themes are horriffic and not suitable for the under 13 set, but I am shocked. The sequel is equally good, but the third was an "eh" for me.


message 50: by Kelly H. (Maybedog), Big Kahuna, Ministry of Illicit Reading (new)

Kelly H. (Maybedog) (maybedog) | 623 comments Mod
I believe A Child Called It was challenged once or twice but the big issue it has faced is whether or not it's a true story. My take is that it is true but through the b&w filter of a child and an author with something to prove. His feelings for his mother are abnormal for a child in that situation. Most children in abusive situations, no matter how horribly they are treated, want their parents to love them and will do anything for approval. The exceptions generally have attachment issues.


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