Aussie Readers discussion

249 views
Talk Genre > Books for Children and Young Teens

Comments Showing 1-50 of 218 (218 new)    post a comment »
« previous 1 3 4 5

message 1: by Mandapanda (new)

Mandapanda One of our new Aussie Readers is dreaming about writing her own children's books and is interested in getting some recommendations. Let's talk all about children's literature in this thread. What children's books had a big effect on you? What do you read to your children?

My favourite children's author was Mary Grant Bruce.The books seem very old fashioned to me now. They were written in 1910 but I still remember being entranced by the stories of kids growing up in the Australian Bush.

A Little Bush Maid by Mary Grant Bruce


message 2: by [deleted user] (new)

There are some fabulous Australian kids authors. I have just added Mem Fox to the book shelves. Possum Magic by Mem Fox was probably my kids favourite book of hers, but she has written thousands.
Graeme Base also brilliant.
Emily Rodda
Pamela L. Travers with Mary Poppins
May Gibbs
The list is long I have just been browsing though our childrens-book shelves there are so many marvelous ones there it is hard to stop. :)


message 3: by Mark (new)

Mark (valiukas) Arnold the Prickly Teddy (Voyages) by Kym Lardner by Kym Lardner is one my kids loved when they were smaller.

As for ones from my own childhood... The Oath of Bad Brown Bill by Stephen Axelsen by Stephen Axelsen is great, and almost unobtainable these days.


message 4: by Belinda. (new)

Belinda. Hamilton (belindahamilton) | 23 comments She's from the land of the long white cloud, but Lynley Dodd has to be my absolute favourite children's author. It's going to be such a shame when my kiddo thinks she's too old to have them read to her anymore.
Nothing like reading with enough expression the cats come to see what the heck is going on at story time.


message 5: by Mandapanda (new)

Mandapanda Belinda. wrote: "Nothing like reading with enough expression the cats come to see what the heck is going on at story time..."

I love that image Belinda! :D


message 6: by Mandapanda (last edited Sep 29, 2010 02:06PM) (new)

Mandapanda Here's a link to our Children‘s Books Shelf in case you need some inspiration.

Plus here's the link to the Best Australian Literature For Children Goodreads listopia list. Take the time to vote for your favourites!


message 7: by Mandapanda (last edited Sep 29, 2010 02:35PM) (new)

Mandapanda Mark wrote: " As for ones from my own childhood, The Oath of Bad Brown Bill, by Stephen Axelsen is great, and almost unobtainable these days..."

That book looks so good Mark and the illustrations are scarily perfect! I found a little blurb that I added to the Goodreads listing:

~The Oath~

“Pure and simple, straight and neat I vow I’ll rob the folk I meet. Be they live or dead and dry I swear I’ll rob the folk I spy, And if I ever break this oath I’ll eat my boots! I’ll eat them both"!


See some of the illustrations here: http://stephenaxelsen.net/books/pictu...

You can get it from the National Library of Australia at:
http://catalogue.nla.gov.au/Record/27...

And there is also a secondhand copy available from Amazon US for $53!!


message 8: by Mark (new)

Mark (valiukas) Mandy wrote: "Mark wrote: "And there is also a secondhand copy available from Amazon US for $53!! "

I've got one in pretty decent condition, which I won't be parting with... I've seen them on Amazon around the $90-$100 mark.


message 9: by Cheryl (last edited Sep 29, 2010 07:11PM) (new)

Cheryl  (cherylllr) My son and I enjoyed Strange Objects and are reading Angel's Gate next, both by Gary Crew.


message 10: by Sarah (new)

Sarah | 3 comments Wow! So many great responses! Thank you for starting this thread, Mandy.

Gail, you're absolutely right about the brilliant Mem Fox. I've just read A Particular Cow by Mem Fox and while it didn't 'particularly' touch my heart like Possum Magic (Voyager Books) by Mem Fox , Wilfrid Gordon McDonald Partridge by Mem Fox , Wombat Divine by Mem Fox to name a few, it makes for a lovely read to a small child. The illustrations are fantastic (by Terry Denton) and are sure to bring a smile.


message 11: by Sarah (new)

Sarah | 3 comments Mandy wrote: "Belinda. wrote: "Nothing like reading with enough expression the cats come to see what the heck is going on at story time..."

I love that image Belinda! :D"


I agree!


message 12: by [deleted user] (new)

Sarah wrote: "Gail, you're absolutely right about the brilliant Mem Fox. I've just read A Particular Cow by Mem Fox..."

Though she is a Kiwi, the absolute all time favourite for my kids when they were little were
Pamela Allen books including,Who Sank the Boat, Belinda,Mr Mcgee Goes to Sea fantastic. I took the kids to the Opera House to see a play based on a compelation of her books it was fabulous.


message 13: by Jan (new)

Jan (auntyjan) And don't forget Jeannie Baker Window by Jeannie Baker Home (Horn Book Fanfare List (Awards)) by Jeannie Baker Where the Forest Meets the Sea by Jeannie Baker The Hidden Forest by Jeannie Baker The Story of Rosy Dock by Jeannie Baker Millicent by Jeannie Baker Grandmother by Jeannie Baker
and Colin Thompson How To Live Forever (Red Fox Picture Books) by Colin Thompson Looking for Atlantis by Colin Thompson The Last Alchemist by Colin Thompson The Paradise Garden by Colin Thompson Castles by Colin Thompson The Tower to the Sun by Colin Thompson

All of these are absolute visual delights...in How to Live Forever, Thompson's attention to detail is amazing...worlds opening up inside drawers, strange book titles...these books are works of art for all ages.


message 14: by Cheryl (new)

Cheryl  (cherylllr) (First, thanks for helping me find this topic again, Jan, I got confused because I'm in too many groups. :)

My 14 yo son and I finished Angel's Gate and enjoyed it very much. A murder mystery, plus an exploration of the meanings of family and of freedom. Have any of you read it? In my library it's shelved as 'juvenile' but we don't think it's a good fit for anyone under age 12 or 13. And the author was a high-school teacher, so I get the impression he was writing for teens.

Also, I had fun with my recent read of Mary Poppins and the first sequel. I think they age well and are still easy enough to read even for younger children. If you've been dithering about whether to read them I recommend you do.


message 15: by Jan (last edited Oct 05, 2010 07:08PM) (new)

Jan (auntyjan) Matt, what are the ages of your children? My daughter loved the Lemony Sicket series, reading them in her early teens.


message 16: by [deleted user] (last edited Oct 05, 2010 07:18PM) (new)

Hmmmmm maybe they do need to be read at an older age. My kids never really liked Lemony Snicket either which surprised me a lot. I gave them the first couple when they were 9 or 10. They liked the movie.


message 17: by [deleted user] (new)

Ahhhh no. That is so cute, I feel his pain.


message 18: by Mandapanda (new)

Mandapanda Your kids sound like lots of fun Matt! My niece only found out Santa wasn't real last year (age 9). She rang me up as soon as her mother told her and in a voice like she was telling me someone had died she said "Did you hear about Santa?" It's so hard not to laugh:D


message 19: by [deleted user] (new)

Ha, my kids are a bit slow. My daughter found out in her 12th year. The hubby then spilled the beans to my son (the big party pooper). Christmas and Easter etc. have never been quite the same. ::sigh::


message 20: by Jan (new)

Jan (auntyjan) You could also try reading them The Lion the Witch and the Wardrobe series. Then re-introduce Lemony Snicket three years from now...the two older ones should be ready for it by then. Don't worry, they'll reach adolescence before you've entirely emerged from it!


message 21: by Cheryl (new)

Cheryl  (cherylllr) I definitely believe in encouraging children to remain as innocent as they want to be for as long as they want to be. Plenty of time later to be serious and cynical. My sons are v25, v22, and 14, and are all striking a good balance between being still loving and yet independent.

(by v25, v22, I mean that they're about to have their birthdays so it hardly pays to mention their current age)


message 22: by Ashleigh (new)

Ashleigh (ashleigj) Andy Griffith
Isobelle Carmody
Paul Jennings
Robin Klein

The best Aussie Children Writers I can remember!!


message 23: by Cheryl (new)

Cheryl  (cherylllr) My library had in stock lots of picture books by Mem Fox, one my Colin Thompson, and none my Jeanne Baker. I'll have to go hunting for more in Inter-Library Loan (ILL).

Do you-all have good libraries? So many of ours were founded by Andrew Carnegie; I don't know if we'd have such a good system without him. Do you have good ILL systems?


message 24: by Mandapanda (new)

Mandapanda Cheryl wrote: "My library had in stock lots of picture books by Mem Fox, one my Colin Thompson, and none my Jeanne Baker. I'll have to go hunting for more in Inter-Li..."

Morning Cheryl! I love my local library. It's huge with a great selection of books and the staff are very friendly. There's a little local art gallery next door so I always get my art fix every time I visit. I don't know what system they use but there are a few librarians among the group members so hopefully they'll be able to tell us.


message 25: by Jan (last edited Oct 09, 2010 05:48PM) (new)

Jan (auntyjan) Make sure you spell it correctly as some computers won't recognise it if you don't. It's Jeannie Baker



I'd be surprised if they didn't have any. Window by Jeannie Baker Where the Forest Meets the Sea by Jeannie Baker The Hidden Forest by Jeannie Baker The Hidden Forest by Jeannie Baker The Story of Rosy Dock by Jeannie Baker Millicent by Jeannie Baker Grandmother by Jeannie Baker


message 26: by Cheryl (new)

Cheryl  (cherylllr) Ok, Jeannie. They didn't have any on the shelf when I was there, but I was able just now to order three, spelling her name carefully, tx. :)

I also loved The Paradise Garden and ordered four more picture-books by Thompson.


message 27: by Mandapanda (new)

Mandapanda Jan wrote: "Make sure you spell it correctly as some computers won't recognise it if you don't. It's Jeannie Baker
I'd be surprised if they didn't have any.Window by Jeannie Baker[bookcover:Where the For..."


Jan you're getting very clever adding book links to your posts now. You must be getting the hang of Goodreads!:)


message 29: by Dee-Ann (new)

Dee-Ann | 644 comments My 15 year old son is hooked on the John Marsden Tomorrow sereis, but he is taking a break and upon my recommendation is reading 'The Hobbit' by JRR Tolkien and he is enjoying it like I did!


message 30: by Mandapanda (new)

Mandapanda I read The Hobbit: Or There and Back Again at about age 12 or 13 and just fell in love with it. I've re-read it many many times in my life and never got tired of it. Same with Lord of the Rings.

Another one that we all loved as kids was Harry the Dirty Dog!


message 31: by Dee-Ann (new)

Dee-Ann | 644 comments Mandy wrote: "...Another one that we all loved as kids was Harry the Dirty Dog! ..."

I loved this book too, but it does not seem to do much for my younger children ... I recall that my eldest liked it however.


message 32: by [deleted user] (new)

Harry the Dirty Dog was the very first library book I borrowed from the school. :D


message 33: by Jan (last edited Oct 10, 2010 10:37PM) (new)

Jan (auntyjan) Has anyone mentioned Andy Griffiths
and Just Tricking!
All his books are great fun, probably best suited to 8-12 year olds. Just Tricking! by Andy Griffiths


message 34: by Ashleigh (new)

Ashleigh (ashleigj) ^^ yeah I mentioned books by Andy Griffiths.
He's a good writer. the books always made me laugh


message 35: by [deleted user] (new)

Also for the 8-12 year olds you can't go past The Rangers Apprentice series The Ruins of Gorlan (Ranger's Apprentice Series #1) by John Flanagan by John Flanagan. There are 9 books released in the series so far. A new one is coming out on 1st November, I have placed an order already. :)


message 36: by Cheryl (new)

Cheryl  (cherylllr) Jan wrote: "Has anyone mentioned Andy Griffiths
and Just Tricking!
All his books are great fun, probably best suited to 8-12 year olds.Just Tricking! by Andy Griffiths"


Are the "Just..." books anything like a series? Our marvelous goodreads librarians are working very hard to make sure readers can easily stay on top of sets of books that belong together, and should be alerted if a reader who reads one "Just..." book would want to read the others, especially if it helps to read them in a certain order.


message 37: by Jill (new)

Jill | 8 comments I loved Little Women, Tom Sawyer, What Katie Did and Did Next and Black Beauty. They are old fashioned now, but such good books.


message 38: by Mandapanda (last edited Oct 11, 2010 11:37PM) (new)

Mandapanda Jill wrote: "I loved Little Women, Tom Sawyer, What Katie Did and Did Next and Black Beauty. They are old fashioned now, but such good books."

Yes I loved Little Women too. Have you seen that book March by Aussie author Geraldine Brooks. It's the story of the absent father and it won a Pulitzer Prize.


message 39: by [deleted user] (new)

I loved Enid Blyton's books and The Silver Brumby books.


message 40: by Janelle (new)

Janelle | 37 comments My 12 year old daughter has just finished the 'Once', 'Then' and 'Now' trilogy by Morris Gleitzman. My 10 year old son loves the 'Toad' series by the same author :)

As a child I loved the 'My Naughty Little Sister' series by Dorothy Edwards, and the 'Anne of Green Gables' books by Lucy Maud Montgomery.


message 41: by Sandy (new)

Sandy Hyatt-James (sandyhyatt-james) I used to read the 'Milly Molly Mandy' (Joyce Lancaster-Brisley) stories to my daughter when she was little. She grown up now, but is still saving them to read to her children, one day.


message 42: by Mandapanda (last edited Oct 13, 2010 09:13PM) (new)

Mandapanda Sandy wrote: "I used to read the 'Milly Molly Mandy' (Joyce Lancaster-Brisley) stories to my daughter when she was little. She grown up now, but is still saving them to read to her children, one day."

God that brings back memories! My mother used to read that to me. I just remembered a poem/nursery rhyme they read to me as well, I don't know if anyone else knows it?

There was a little girl, who had a little curl
Right in the middle of her forehead,
And when she was good, she was very, very good,
But when she was bad she was horrid.

She stood on her head, on her little trundle bed,
With nobody by for to hinder;
She screamed and she squalled, she yelled and she bawled,
And drummed her little heels against the winder.

Her mother heard the noise, and thought it was the boys
Playing in the empty attic,
She rushed upstairs, and caught her unawares,
And spanked her, most emphatic.


They used to say that line When she was good she was very very good but when she was bad she was horrid to me a lot! I must have been a naughty child. LOL


message 43: by Sarah (new)

Sarah (sorcha-sidhe) As a teen I loved the Pagan Series by Catherine Jinks. They introduced me to medieval history and I've been obsessed ever since, and they were so much fun to read. Still are, even as an adult. :)
~S.


message 44: by Regan (last edited Oct 13, 2010 10:52PM) (new)

Regan (mollytornado) Mandy wrote: "Sandy wrote: "I used to read the 'Milly Molly Mandy' (Joyce Lancaster-Brisley) stories to my daughter when she was little. She grown up now, but is still saving them to read to her children, one d..."

I remember that poem. :D My mum said the first verse to me a lot too because she thought it described me perfectly, haha. I also actually used to sometimes get a 'curl in the middle of my forehead' depending on how my fringe was behaving that day.

Oh, the memories! :P


message 45: by Sandy (new)

Sandy Hyatt-James (sandyhyatt-james) I remember the poem too, Mandy. My parents used to apply it to me when I was growing up!

Has anyone heard the song:

Milly Molly Mandy, sweet as sugar candy, pretty little eyes of blue?

I used to sing it to my daughter. I got it up on Youtube the other day, it took me right back!


message 46: by Mandapanda (new)

Mandapanda Sandy wrote: "I remember the poem too, Mandy. My parents used to apply it to me when I was growing up!

Has anyone heard the song:

Milly Molly Mandy, sweet as sugar candy, pretty little eyes of blue?

I used..."


No I've never heard that song! It's cute.:)


message 47: by Cheryl (new)

Cheryl  (cherylllr) Fringe? Bangs? I too had untamed hair over by forehead and I loved this verse. I didn't know about the other two stanzas - Thank You!


message 48: by Mandapanda (new)

Mandapanda Cheryl wrote: "Fringe? Bangs? I too had untamed hair over by forehead and I loved this verse. I didn't know about the other two stanzas - Thank You!"

Yes fringe = bangs. And from another thread I wonder how you guys developed the word 'fall' for autumn? Language is such an interesting thing...


message 49: by Mandapanda (last edited Oct 22, 2010 03:25PM) (new)

Mandapanda Carmel wrote: "Mandy wrote: "Cheryl wrote: "Fringe? Bangs? I too had untamed hair over by forehead and I loved this verse. I didn't know about the other two stanzas - Thank You!"
And from another thread I w..."


A lot of people worry about that. It has been mentioned in other threads as well. I think with globalisation and the introduction of new technology it is inevitable that the english language will 'homogenise' to some extent but I don't think we'll lose our way of speech altogether. Are there some Aussie shows your kids can watch. As I've mentioned somewhere else in this group I love that kids show 'Lockie Leonard' which is based on one of Tim Winton's books. It is PERFECT in a very Australian way!:D

EDIT: Actually the Americanisation of Australian English is such an interesting and controversial subject. I've found several great articles for anyone interested in learning more:

http://www.convictcreations.com/cultu...
http://www.ironbarkresources.com/arti... (this might sound a little anti-American, sorry to our US friends in the group, but I think it's worth including to demonstrate the passionate response people have when their national identity is threatened.)
http://eng.anarchopedia.org/Australia...
Did you know that we have an Australian National Dictionary Centre: http://www.anu.edu.au/ANDC/index.php

And did anyone know that 'truck' is an American word? Apparently we're supposed to be saying 'lorry', LOL.


message 50: by Cheryl (new)

Cheryl  (cherylllr) Language diversity is a good thing. I do hope y'all don't blur to American, so to speak...


« previous 1 3 4 5
back to top