All Ears Audiobooks discussion

14 views
General Discussion > Banned Books Week - September 25th

Comments Showing 1-9 of 9 (9 new)    post a comment »
dateDown arrow    newest »

message 1: by Julie (new)

Julie (juliemoncton) | 248 comments Mod
Banned Books Week starts today! In the US, the last week in September is officially Banned Books Week to celebrate the freedom to read. It's also a great way to bring awareness to censorship. Here's a list of some of the most banned books (and audiobooks) of the decade:
- Harry Potter series - J.K. Rowling
- The Chocolate War - Robert Cormier
- Of Mice and Men - John Steinbeck
- His Dark Materials trilogy - Philip Pullman
- The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn - Mark Twain
- To Kill a Mockingbird - Harper Lee
- The Giver - Lois Lowry
- A Brave New World - Aldous Huxley
- 1984 - George Orwell

If you're interested in seeing more titles, check out the ALA (American Library Association) website - http://www.ala.org/ala/issuesadvocacy...


message 2: by Julie (new)

Julie (juliemoncton) | 248 comments Mod
Philip Pullman made this brilliant comment about censorship when asked if his latest book The Good Man Jesus and the Scoundrel Christ was offensive.

"It was a shocking thing to say and I knew it was a shocking thing to say. But no one has the right to live without being shocked. No one has the right to spend their life without being offended. Nobody has to read this book. Nobody has to pick it up. Nobody has to open it. And if you open it and read it, you don't have to like it. And if you read it and you dislike it, you don't have to remain silent about it. You can write to me, you can complain about it, you can write to the publisher, you can write to the papers, you can write your own book. You can do all those things, but there your rights stop. No one has the right to stop me writing this book. No one has the right to stop it being published, or bought, or sold or read. That's all I have to say on that subject."

I just love it!


message 3: by Tara (new)

Tara | 20 comments Hi Julie,

Regarding Banned book week - I had suggested to the person at the store that maybe you can list in a table format:

The book name/author
When published
when banned
Banned from e.g. elementary schools, from being published in the US etc.
Reason for ban
What organization banned it
When the ban was lifted

Some of the books I can see why they were banned in a certain time era etc. but others I really couldn't see the reason. So I was curious.

Terri


message 4: by Donna (new)

Donna (donnaweyer) http://flavorwire.com/121056/the-absu...

Boldtype's take on why some of the books are on the list... interesting read.


message 5: by Julie (new)

Julie (juliemoncton) | 248 comments Mod
Tara wrote: "Hi Julie,

Regarding Banned book week - I had suggested to the person at the store that maybe you can list in a table format:

The book name/author
When published
when banned
Banned from e...."


Hi Terri,

So glad you asked the question about why certain books are banned or challenged. The American Library Association keeps a database of challenges, and logs the reason for each book. In 2009, there were 460 challenged books. Most were challenged by parents because they felt the book was sexually explicit, unsuited to an age group, contained inappropriate language, displayed violence or homosexuality. For some of the books listed, I know why they were banned - e.g. Harry Potter was challenged because of witch craft (even in our store we get parents who won't let their children listen to fantasy books because of the references to devil worship) and His Dark Materials is considered anti-church. But I can't think of why James and the Giant Peach was challenged!

Thanks, Donna, for the Boldtype article - very interesting! One of the most outrageous examples of book banning that I've seen was for an illustrated version of Little Red Riding Hood. The reason was "misuse of alcohol" because a picture of the basket of goodies for her grandmother included a bottle of wine. When and where did this happen? California in 1989!!


message 6: by Lars (new)

Lars Guthrie | 91 comments Donna wrote: "http://flavorwire.com/121056/the-absu...

Boldtype's take on why some of the books are on the list... interesting read."


The best logic was 'Silas Marner.' Ah, the pleasures of forbidden fruit.


message 7: by Donna (new)

Donna (donnaweyer) Lars wrote: The best logic was 'Silas Marner.' Ah, the pleasures of forbidden fruit.


Isn't that just perfect! I was chuckling when i read that!

When i was in High School there was a stink raised about the classic "Kabloona" because there was some mild sexual innuendo at the end of the book. It was settled by having a second option available for the kids of objecting parents to read. Of course all the kids ended up reading it, with or without parent approval.


message 8: by Lars (new)

Lars Guthrie | 91 comments Donna wrote: "When i was in High School there was a stink raised..."

My story: I was working with a seventh grader who picked 'The Absolutely True Diary of a Part Time Indian' by Sherman Alexie from some books I recommended on her school reading list.

Her (shocked): 'There are some things in it that kids aren't supposed to read.'

Me (innocently): 'I didn't think of that. Well, let's look at some other choices.'

Her (anxiously): 'No, no...I want to read it!'


message 9: by Donna (new)

Donna (donnaweyer) Lars wrote: "Donna wrote: "When i was in High School there was a stink raised..."

My story: I was working with a seventh grader who picked 'The Absolutely True Diary of a Part Time Indian' by Sherman Alexie ..."


of course


back to top