Q&A with author Margaret Coel discussion

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Writing in the mystery/crime genre

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message 1: by Margaret (new)

Margaret Coel | 20 comments Mod
Why did you choose to concentrate on writing in the mystery/crime genre and how does it affect your awareness or perspective of crime around you and in the world?


message 2: by Mallory (new)

Mallory (mallorybraus) | 1 comments Hi Margaret,

I'm a huge fan of the series! Reading your novels, it always seems so seemless--the way the mystery unravels throughout the book. I was wondering what your writer process may be for creating a believable mystery and then solving it in a realistic way? And how do you keep coming up with new and thrilling mysteries to solve?


message 3: by Little (new)

Little Fish | 1 comments I have been giving to the Wind River St Stephen's Mission for years, and when I read the back of one of your Mysteries, and it said Wind River Reservation, I just had to read your books.
I have enjoyed EVERY SINGLE ONE!
I would guess that your stories come from the many Story Tellings of the Shoshone and the Arapaho Peoples, am I right?
Edna Little Fish


message 4: by Margaret (new)

Margaret Coel | 20 comments Mod
Margaret wrote: "Why did you choose to concentrate on writing in the mystery/crime genre and how does it affect your awareness or perspective of crime around you and in the world?"

I love to read mysteries, so when I decided to write a novel, naturally I chose to write a mystery. It's not a decision I have ever regretted. I wrote history books before turning to mysteries, and believe me the two have a lot in common.


message 5: by Margaret (new)

Margaret Coel | 20 comments Mod
Margaret wrote: "Why did you choose to concentrate on writing in the mystery/crime genre and how does it affect your awareness or perspective of crime around you and in the world?"

Forgot to answer whether writing mysteries affects my awareness of crime around me. Definitely. Also, I'm always searching for new ideas in the true crime stories that appear in the newspapers. Some are useless, however because no one would ever believe somebody could be that stupid.


message 6: by Margaret (new)

Margaret Coel | 20 comments Mod
Mallory wrote: "Hi Margaret,

I'm a huge fan of the series! Reading your novels, it always seems so seemless--the way the mystery unravels throughout the book. I was wondering what your writer process may be for ..."

I do a lot of what I call "ruminating" about the story before I set out to write it, so I pretty much have things mapped out ahead of time. I also do a "road map," a loose --very loose--outline, then I delve in.
Usually when I'm in the midst of writing one novel, I will get the idea for the next. It's almost as if the novels trigger one another.


message 7: by Margaret (new)

Margaret Coel | 20 comments Mod
Little wrote: "I have been giving to the Wind River St Stephen's Mission for years, and when I read the back of one of your Mysteries, and it said Wind River Reservation, I just had to read your books.
I have en..."


Ideas for my books come from the newspapers, that is, from what is actually going on in Indian country, and from history. I'm intrigued by what has happened in the past and the way it continues to affect the present. But Arapaho stories have also given me a lot of good ideas. Wife of Moon came directly from an Arapaho story titled, The Woman Who Climbed to the Sky.


message 8: by Jan C (new)

Jan C (woeisme) | 3 comments Margaret wrote: "Margaret wrote: "Why did you choose to concentrate on writing in the mystery/crime genre and how does it affect your awareness or perspective of crime around you and in the world?"

I love to read ..."


I've read a couple of your books. I don't recall their titles off the top of my head. The one I enjoyed the most, I think, was one that involved a descendant or a diary of Sacajawea's.

I had first gotten involved in reading mysteries when one of my history professors in college recommended Josephine Tey's The Daughter of Time. Then I just started reading everybody.

Each of these books blends two of my faves - history and mystery.

I believe another book of yours addressed the problems of spousal abuse, particularly on the reservation. Or even just among the poor. I thought it was very effective.

Do you try and take things from the Native culture/past in your stories?


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