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Previous Book Clubs > The World is Blue by Sylvia Earle

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message 1: by M (last edited Sep 15, 2010 02:05PM) (new)

M (wwwgoodreadscomprofilem) | 337 comments Although we have started The Monthly History's of Science " of September 2010 with Richard Dawkins's book The Selfish Gene: 30th Anniversary Edition ( we'll read it all the month) and which is the poll's winner, a lot of books written by great scientists have been nominated by the group's members.

Among them The World Is Blue by Sylvia Earle, the 2009 TEDPrize's winner.The History of Science's book club will read and discuss her book from September 15 to October 15, 2010.

Sylvia Earle has written a wish for the blue ocean

“I wish you would use all means at your disposal — films! expeditions! the web! more! — to ignite public support for a global network of marine protected areas, hope spots large enough to save and restore the ocean, the blue heart of the planet.” (Sylvia Earle’s Wish)

And you, have you a wish for The Blue Ocean ......


message 2: by Marieke (new)

Marieke I used to participate in "Beach Cleanups." it was amazing how much trash we picked up when at first glance the beach appeared clean. I have many wishes for the ocean, but one is for the ocean to stop being a place to dump things. I think we need to stop producing so much trash and waste. We need to do a better job disposing the waste we do produce. I'm looking forward to reading what Sylvia Earle has to say about this and what solutions she proposes.

has anyone read this book or started it?


message 3: by Marieke (new)

Marieke I haven't gotten very far in the book so I don't have any comments on it yet. But i saw this article about coral reefs and thought it would be relevant to this discussion.


message 4: by Leilani (new)

Leilani (spanishviolet) | 2 comments I'm alternating it with other, lighter reads. Reading more than one section at a time is too grim. Fascinating, but grim.

She makes excellent use of literary & cultural references to highlight our attitudes toward the oceans.


message 5: by Kirsten (new)

Kirsten | 282 comments I just started this book and I'm finding it to be fascinating thus far. I spent four years of school reading books like this, so I guess I'm still in practice. I like to read 4-5 books at once, though, so it might take me a bit to work through it.


message 6: by Marieke (new)

Marieke Kirsten wrote: I like to read 4-5 books at once, t..."

ha! i'm glad i'm not the only one! :D

i started this book in earnest just the other day and am having trouble putting it down even though i do feel like i'm being whacked over the head with really upsetting information. like leilani said, fascinating, but grim...very grim. i think it will take me a while to process all of it.

incidentally, today i saw this National Geographic article about the seafood crisis, which is very much related to this book.


message 7: by M (last edited Oct 09, 2010 03:21PM) (new)

M (wwwgoodreadscomprofilem) | 337 comments Marieke wrote: "I haven't gotten very far in the book so I don't have any comments on it yet. But i saw this article about coral reefs and thought it would be relevant to this discussion."

The article you have selected for the discussion is relevant, Marieke. During the group community past's discussions and specially for "2010, The Year of Biodiversity" we have presented this great but endangered species, corals.


message 8: by M (last edited Oct 09, 2010 03:24PM) (new)

M (wwwgoodreadscomprofilem) | 337 comments Marieke wrote: "Kirsten wrote: I like to read 4-5 books at once, t..."

ha! i'm glad i'm not the only one! :D

i started this book in earnest just the other day and am having trouble putting it down even though i ..."


Sylvia Earle's book " The World Is Blue" is an eloquent book about the situation we know in the oceans. It's always difficult to see the reality that we, humans, have created.
Thanksfully," The World is Blue " is also a message for hope and an urgent book to read. There's a lot of scientists working around the world to increase our knowledge on biodiversity, life in the oceans. I hope that all these new discoveries will help us to live on Earth.
I'm particularly thinking at an international expedition " Tara Oceans " which lived France for more than one year, working in collaboration with American, European Universities and a lot of institutions around the world, to increase our knowledge on oceans's marine biodiversity.
You can follow the expedition at " Tara Oceans " website (in French and English)
" Tara Oceans " is a project of " 2010, The International Year of Biodiversity "

http://oceans.taraexpeditions.org/en/...


message 9: by Kirsten (new)

Kirsten | 282 comments Kirsten wrote: I like to read 4-5 books at once, t..."

ha! i'm glad i'm not the only one! :D

You're definitely not. If I read just one book at once, I get bored and can't focus on it, so I have to read many to focus on all of them. If that makes sense at all...

I like this book. Could just be me, but I think the gloom and doom is there, but that there is definitely a hopeful "this is what we can/need to do" message in there too. Gloom and doom definitely has it's place, though. Obviously the oceans are being trashed and if the author were rosy about it, then people would like "oh look, everything's fine". That being said, I think sometimes environmental types could use to be a little less dramatic. (I have an ES degree, I can say that from personal experience) I like the mix this book brings to the table.


message 10: by Marieke (new)

Marieke Kirsten, it's great to have someone with strong background knowledge contributing to this discussion! i'm just a "concerned citizen" for lack of a better description of myself. however, a friend of mine, who happens to be a conservation biologist specializing in fish, was excited to hear that i would be reading this book. she said that sylvia earle is a great communicator and since delving into this book, i totally agree. despite the "gloom and doom-ness" of much of what she presents to us, i feel inspired to keep reading and learning more about all of these problems.

this might be a hard question for you, kirsten, since you have a background in environmental science...but i'm wondering what things everyone is learning...what information is totally new or presented in a way that impresses you more profoundly than before you read this book?


message 11: by Marieke (new)

Marieke Kirsten said, If I read just one book at once, I get bored and can't focus on it, so I have to read many to focus on all of them. If that makes sense at all...

INDEED!!


message 12: by Marieke (new)

Marieke Michelle said I'm particularly thinking at an international expedition " Tara Oceans " which lived France for more than one year, working in collaboration with American, European Universities and a lot of institutions around the world, to increase our knowledge on oceans's marine biodiversity.
You can follow the expedition at " Tara Oceans " website (in French and English)
" Tara Oceans " is a project of " 2010, The International Year of Biodiversity "


this is really interesting, michelle--i wasn't aware of this expedition. i LOVE imaging technology so i'm looking at that part of the website right now. there is a lot of information about plankton, and to answer my own question above, i think i am most struck by plankton's role in how Earth functions. I'm not finished with Sylvia Earle's book yet, but already i want to know more about plankton. today i saw this article about it.


message 13: by Kirsten (new)

Kirsten | 282 comments I always learn things wherever I go and whatever I read. Part of what I learned and am constantly trying to learn to do better is communicate what I know in a way that people who do not have a degree similar to mine can understand. It helps me at my job and in my life. People don't like being talked down to, and they're more likely to listen if the person speaking says things they can follow and understand, and I think this book did a great job of that.

Side note: I spent my summer working in fisheries research, so conservation biology about fish is right up my alley.

I really enjoyed reading this book. It was a quick read for me, and one I'd recommend to others.


message 14: by M (last edited Oct 16, 2010 01:10PM) (new)

M (wwwgoodreadscomprofilem) | 337 comments Marieke wrote: "Michelle said I'm particularly thinking at an international expedition " Tara Oceans " which lived France for more than one year, working in collaboration with American, European Universities and a..."

Thanks for the add of this interesting article about plankton, Marieke. We have to learn a lot about the oceans. Sylvia Earle's book is a first step to increase our knowledge. Here's an another link about life in the oceans and plankton
http://www.wired.co.uk/news/archive/2...

It's a good idea to follow " Tara Oceans ",too. I also add the link of IPBES , the international platform on Biodiversity which was created a few months ago.

http://ipbes.net/

and of course, Sylvia Earle's website " Mission Blue "

http://ocean.nationalgeographic.com/o...


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