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HISTORY OF RELIGIONS > ORIENTAL ORTHODOXY

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message 1: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (last edited Nov 14, 2014 01:59AM) (new)

Bentley | 44167 comments Mod
This is the thread which will be devoted to the discussion of the history of Oriental Orthodoxy and related topics.


The Patriarchs

Oriental Orthodoxy is the faith of those Eastern Christian churches which recognize only the first three ecumenical councils—the First Council of Nicaea, the First Council of Constantinople and the First Council of Ephesus.

They rejected the dogmatic definitions of the Council of Chalcedon held in AD 451 in Chalcedon.

Hence, these Oriental Orthodox churches are also called Old Oriental churches, Miaphysite churches, or the Non-Chalcedonian churches, known to Western Christianity and much of Eastern Orthodoxy as Monophysite churches (although the Oriental Orthodox themselves reject this description as inaccurate, having rejected the teachings of both Nestorius and Eutyches).

These churches are in full communion with each other but not with the Eastern Orthodox churches. Slow dialogue towards restoring communion began in the mid-20th century.

Despite the potentially confusing nomenclature (the word "Oriental" being synonymous with "Eastern"), Oriental Orthodox churches are distinct from those that are collectively referred to as the Eastern Orthodox Church.

The Oriental Orthodox communion comprises six churches: Coptic Orthodox, Ethiopian Orthodox, Eritrean Orthodox, Syriac Orthodox, Malankara Orthodox Syrian Church (Indian Orthodox Church) and Armenian Apostolic churches.

These churches, while being in communion with one another, are hierarchically independent.

The Oriental Orthodox Churches and the rest of the Church split over differences in Christological terminology. The First Council of Nicaea (325) declared that Jesus Christ is God, that is to say, "consubstantial" with the Father; and the First Council of Ephesus (431) that Jesus, though divine as well as human, is only one being, or person (hypostasis).

Twenty years after Ephesus, the Council of Chalcedon declared that Jesus is one person in two complete natures, one human and one divine. Those who opposed Chalcedon likened its doctrine to the Nestorian heresy, condemned at Ephesus, that Christ was two distinct beings, one divine (the Logos) and one human (Jesus).

(Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Orienta...)


Includes the following Churches

* Coptic Orthodox
* Ethiopian Orthodox
* Eritrean Orthodox
* Syriac Orthodox
* Malankara Orthodox Syrian Church (Indian Orthodox Church
* Armenian Apostolic Church



message 2: by Jill (new)

Jill Hutchinson (bucs1960) Exactly what is Oriental Orthodoxy? It is often confused with Eastern Orthodoxy (such as Russian or Greek). This short description explains the religion;

Oriental Orthodoxy is the faith of those Eastern Christian churches which recognize only the first three ecumenical councils—the First Council of Nicaea, the First Council of Constantinople and the First Council of Ephesus. They rejected the dogmatic definitions of the Council of Chalcedon held in AD 451 in Chalcedon. Hence, these Oriental Orthodox churches are also called Old Oriental churches, Miaphysite churches, or the Non-Chalcedonian churches, known to Western Christianity and much of Eastern Orthodoxy as Monophysite churches (although the Oriental Orthodox themselves reject this description as inaccurate, having rejected the teachings of both Nestorius and Eutyches). These churches are in full communion with each other but not with the Eastern Orthodox churches. Slow dialogue towards restoring communion began in the mid-20th century.

Despite the potentially confusing nomenclature (the word "Oriental" being synonymous with "Eastern"), Oriental Orthodox churches are distinct from those that are collectively referred to as the Eastern Orthodox Church. The Oriental Orthodox communion comprises six churches: Coptic Orthodox, Ethiopian Orthodox, Eritrean Orthodox, Syriac Orthodox, Malankara Orthodox Syrian Church (Indian Orthodox Church) and Armenian Apostolic churches. These churches, while being in communion with one another, are hierarchically independent.

The Oriental Orthodox Churches and the rest of the Church split over differences in Christological terminology. The First Council of Nicaea (325) declared that Jesus Christ is God, that is to say, "consubstantial" with the Father; and the First Council of Ephesus (431) that Jesus, though divine as well as human, is only one being, or person (hypostasis). Twenty years after Ephesus, the Council of Chalcedon declared that Jesus is one person in two complete natures, one human and one divine. Those who opposed Chalcedon likened its doctrine to the Nestorian heresy, condemned at Ephesus, that Christ was two distinct beings, one divine (the Logos) and one human (Jesus). (Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Orienta...)



message 3: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)

Bentley | 44167 comments Mod
Thank you Teri


message 4: by Jill (new)

Jill Hutchinson (bucs1960) I hate to admit it but I had never heard of Oriental Orthodoxy....I know Greek and Russian and Eastern but Oriental was new to me. I am now informed!


message 5: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)

Bentley | 44167 comments Mod
Thank you Teri


message 6: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)

Bentley | 44167 comments Mod
Thank you Teri for all of the adds on the Religion threads.


message 7: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)

Bentley | 44167 comments Mod
This thread is not about the Eastern Orthodox Group of churches.

Are Orthodox Churches the same as Eastern Orthodox Churches?

Not all Orthodox Churches are 'Eastern Orthodox'.

The 'Oriental Orthodox Churches' have theological differences with the Eastern Orthodox and form a separate group, while a few Orthodox Churches are not 'in communion' with the others.

Not all Churches in the Eastern tradition are Orthodox - Eastern Churches that are not included in the Orthodox group include the Eastern Catholic Churches.

The Eastern Orthodox Churches

The nominal head of the Eastern Orthodox Churches is the Patriarch of Constantinople. However, he is only first among equals and has no real authority over Churches other than his own.

There are 15 'autocephalous Churches', listed in order of precedence.

Churches 1-9 are led by Patriarchs, while the others are led by Archbishops or Metropolitans:

1. Church of Constantinople (ancient)
2. Church of Alexandria (ancient)
3. Church of Antioch (ancient)
4. Church of Jerusalem (ancient)
5. Church of Russia (established in 1589)
6. Church of Serbia (1219)
7. Church of Romania (1925)
8. Church of Bulgaria (927)
9. Church of Georgia (466)
10. Church of Cyprus (434)
11. Church of Greece (1850)
12. Church of Poland (1924)
13. Church of Albania (1937)
14. Church of Czech and Slovak lands (1951)
15. The Orthodox Church in America (1970)

The Orthodox communion also includes a number of 'autonomous Churches':

1. Church of Sinai
2. Church of Finland
3. Church of Estonia*
4. Church of Japan*
5. Church of China*
6. Church of Ukraine*
7. Archdiocese of Ohrid*


message 8: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)

Bentley | 44167 comments Mod
Oriental Orthodox-Roman Catholic Interchurch Marriages and Other

Oriental Orthodox-Roman Catholic Interchurch Marriages and Other by Standing Conference of Oriental Orthodox by Standing Conference of Oriental Orthodox (no photo)

Synopsis:

A resource for priests and families entering into interchurch marriages of Roman Catholics and Oriental Orthodox, specifically Syrian and Armenian.


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