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Favorite Authors/Books/Series > Dave Robicheaux Series

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message 1: by Garret (new)

Garret (ggannuch) James Lee Burke James Lee Burke

This is a strong and skillful series. Burke beautifully captures the Louisiana landscape of New Iberia and New Orleans. In addition to this strong sense of place, the well written protagonist is given many dimensions, the language and style is lyrical, and many social and moral issues are delt with.

The audio additions are well read.

The latest book just came out: The Glass Rainbow by James Lee Burke The Glass Rainbow, I haven't gotten to this one yet. Has anyone read it?

Here is a link to a great interview with the author:
http://www.writersvoice.net/2010/08/j...


message 2: by Donna, Co-Moderator (new)

Donna | 2178 comments Mod
I recently read my first Burke book, Black Cherry Blues: A Dave Robicheaux Novel and I was really impressed by it. I know this one was a little different from most of the series since it is set a great deal in Montana but the character of Robicheaux is complex and interesting and I am looking forward to reading more in the series.


message 3: by Scout (new)

Scout (goodreadscomscout) | 1347 comments I haven't read that one yet, but I've read all the others. My favorite is Purple Cane Road. The next best thing to being in that area of Louisiana is reading one of Burke's books. Really complex characters, too. The first word that comes to mind in describing Clete is loyal. The second, self-destructive. Myriad others follow. Would you want a friend like Clete?


message 4: by James (new)

James Thane (jameslthane) | 123 comments The complexity of the characters is one of the things I love about this series. Would I like to have Clete for a friend? Well, maybe the next time I was in a bar fight! Otherwise, having him for a friend could be a full-time job...


message 5: by Tyler (new)

Tyler (alienlanes) | 18 comments I've read two James Lee Burke novels and they have pretty unsatisfying conclusions. Robicheaux and Purcell end up killing all the bad guys, pretty much all of them. I mean the writing is nice but that is more secondary to a good story for me. Killing off all the bad guys with no consequences seems to be a pretty weak way to conclude a story. I realize novels aren't meant to be completely realistic but this stretches it to the point of ridiculousness. So do most or all of the other novels end the same way?


message 6: by Erich (new)

Erich Sysak Burke is one of the best for sure. But Bob is right that Burke's plots fizzle out. But I still enjoy the characters, the language, and the history....


message 7: by Scout (new)

Scout (goodreadscomscout) | 1347 comments I asked the question about Clete because I think the complexity of relationships is something Burke pays attention to. If you accepted Clete (or anyone like him) as a true friend, it would be a blessing and a curse. If you put the blessings and the curses on a scale, which way would the scale tip? You can apply this to any relationship. You know you've struck gold when it doesn't matter to either of you which way the scale is tipping at the moment. The important thing is the constancy of the relationship. Robicheaux is a character who understands this.


message 8: by Barbara (last edited Sep 18, 2010 02:03PM) (new)

Barbara (cinnabarb) | 8062 comments Bob wrote: "I've read two James Lee Burke novels and they have pretty unsatisfying conclusions. Robicheaux and Purcell end up killing all the bad guys, pretty much all of them. I mean the writing is nice but t..."

This is a little deceptive Bob because sometimes a character that is "killed" is resurrected in a later book. Kind of depends on the cause of "death" ;) I can understand how you feel but, to me, it's kind of satisfying that the bad guys get it in the end.


message 9: by Garret (new)

Garret (ggannuch) Scout wrote: "I asked the question about Clete because I think the complexity of relationships is something Burke pays attention to. If you accepted Clete (or anyone like him) as a true friend, it would be a bl..."

I would agree.

In an audio interview I listened to (possibly the one I linked to above) Burke says that he intends Purcell as the other half of Robicheaux. But your observations about the relationship as written are excellent.

Their relationship was strained over a 2 or 3 book time frame and Robicheaux states at one point that he had given up on Clete. But obviously that ended up being a blip in the road.

If I remember correctly Clete is left out of both movies. I missed his presence in those films. I hope that Tommy Lee Jones' future films of the novels put Clete back into the story.



He certainly livens things up, provides comic relief and adds a dimension to the


message 10: by Garret (new)

Garret (ggannuch) Barbara wrote: "Bob wrote: "I've read two James Lee Burke novels and they have pretty unsatisfying conclusions. Robicheaux and Purcell end up killing all the bad guys, pretty much all of them. I mean the writing i..."

Certainly a lot of the bad guys get it but not literally all. Dave and Batiste save the dirty politician near the end of one of the stories, for example.

Some people complain about the violence and the number of murders in each book. I never found either bothersome, distracting or unreal. There is basis in fact to not only some of the characters but also to the story lines. The latest novel is based on a series of ongoing and unsolved murders in Louisiana.


message 11: by Tyler (new)

Tyler (alienlanes) | 18 comments Just when Robicheaux kills a ton of people and there are seemingly no consequences.


message 12: by Kathleen (new)

Kathleen (missbelgravia) | 12 comments Garret -- I've seen "In the Electric Mist" but didn't know there was another Dave Robicheaux movie. Which other book was made into a movie?


message 13: by Jan C (new)

Jan C (woeisme) | 35310 comments Heaven's Prisoners - http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0116508/. I wasn't aware there was a movie of In the Electric Mist.


message 14: by Garret (new)

Garret (ggannuch) Tommy Lee Jones mentioned in an interview that he has the film rights to Dixie City Jam by James Lee Burke Dixie City Jam


message 15: by Kathleen (new)

Kathleen (missbelgravia) | 12 comments Thanks Jan and Garret. Nice to know there are two more to look forward to seeing.


message 16: by Donna, Co-Moderator (new)

Donna | 2178 comments Mod
Well I just added the 2 movies to my ever growing Netflix queue. Thanks for the information.


message 17: by Jan C (new)

Jan C (woeisme) | 35310 comments I just came across this short story originally published in Esquire in 2006. http://www.esquire.com/fiction/fictio...

It was on their fiction site. Not Dave Robicheaux but James Lee Burke.


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