Love Inspired Historicals discussion

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Do you remember....

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message 1: by Jennifer (new)

Jennifer (jennafraugh) | 4102 comments who taught you to read and how they did it? We were discussing it in my reading class the other day...why some people were turned off by reading and others loved it. It all came down to how their teachers and parents taught and encouraged them,etc... Just wondering.


message 2: by Jennifer (last edited Sep 11, 2010 09:07AM) (new)

Jennifer (jennafraugh) | 4102 comments And when I mean by how they did it; was it with round robin reading with a textbook,did they let you pick the book, did they teacher you letters and words first or just throw a paragraph in front of you and then break it down. It could help me in my class next week! Thanks.


message 3: by JanetTronstad (new)

JanetTronstad Author Tronstad | 2759 comments Mod
Jennifer -- that's a good question. I can't specifically remember learning, but I suspect it was very young. My mother taught in a one-room schoolhouse in a rural area (three families in the school) and she didn't have day care for me so I was there too at a young age (probably three) --I'd guess that's when I learned. I'm sure I was jazzed to be there with the older kids. I have always loved to be read to and my mother did that as well. I've always felt sorry for people who don't like to read.


message 4: by Ausjenny (new)

Ausjenny | 4954 comments I cant remember that far back. But i know mum and dad and even my brother whos over 4years older read to me before I ever learnt to read. When we went to school I think we learnt our letters and I remember taking words home to learn we had the Dick and Dora readers. they had a cat called fluff and a dog called nip.
I still have them somewhere I think (it is possible they went when I moved) I do remember we learnt by phonics and learnt to sound out words like c a t. I remember learning the different sounds and words that go with those sounds.
I do think the love of reading comes from way before you go to school with being read to as a baby or infant etc. We also didn't have tv so didnt have shows like seaseme street although I remember some of the discussion about it not being the best as it taught the ABC not the sounds of abc.


message 5: by Heidi (last edited Sep 13, 2010 12:31PM) (new)

Heidi | 985 comments It's odd, but I don't remember learning the skill sets required to learn to read at all. I know that my mom read to me, and my dad made up wonderful stories for me. She has also told me that I knew how to read prior to entering school. However, I do remember that in school we would be read to, learned to sound out words we didn't know, as well as reading on our own in our school books to expand on our reading skills.

I think that I liked being read to best. I still love to listen to books on tape once in awhile in fact. I can recall our teacher in third or fourth grade reading to us daily from The Island of the Blue Dolphins, and just laying my head on the desk as I played out the story in my mind. It made me want to read all the more because I wanted more scenes like the ones in that book dancing through my head! It is one of my favorite memories of my school years in fact :)


message 6: by Heidi (last edited Sep 12, 2010 11:17AM) (new)

Heidi | 985 comments Janet Tronstad wrote: "Jennifer -- that's a good question. I can't specifically remember learning, but I suspect it was very young. My mother taught in a one-room schoolhouse in a rural area (three families in the scho..."

A one room schoolhouse, and your mom the teacher at it, wow! What a wonderful history, and probably great memories, you have Janet! :)


message 7: by JanetTronstad (new)

JanetTronstad Author Tronstad | 2759 comments Mod
Heidi -- I was very young so I don't remember much but a sense of coziness about it.


message 8: by Barbara (new)

Barbara | 518 comments As others have mentioned, I entered Kindergarten already loving books because I was read to every day and was already recognizing many words. As far as actual instruction, it was a combination of phonics and memorizing certain sight words. We were one of the last groups to use the Dick and Jane readers in our area. Also, my mom read all the time and I saw her example.


message 9: by Jennifer (new)

Jennifer (jennafraugh) | 4102 comments If you can't remember it's usually cause it came fairly easy to you. That's what all my professors say. The more you were surrounded by it at a younger age, the more you enjoy it.


message 10: by Ausjenny (new)

Ausjenny | 4954 comments I did love reading but I also struggled with it. like spelling. I still have trouble spelling.
I have a friend who helped with support for kids who need extra help at school. She helped with the spelling and would say picture the word in your head and they would just look at her. When she told me I said huh?
I didn't get what she was saying either. seems some people can visualise the words in there head where others like me just cant see them.
Spelling has always been a problem with me and even now there are words I need to sound out to try and work out what they are. I use to love reading but my reading age would have been below my actual age.
I tried reading Anne of Green gables at 12 but it was just to old for my reading age. (I read and reread enid byton till I was well into my teens.)
It did get better in high school
I do think the phonics way we learnt is much better than how they have been teaching here up til recently (where you write like it sounds but doesn't matter if its spelt wrong)
If I had learnt like that I would have had no hope!
Not sure how its been done in America.


message 11: by Patsy (new)

Patsy | 217 comments I don't exactly who taught me to read and how. Had to be just by going to school. We didn't have kindergarden back then so I was 5 when I started school. (Because of late birthday) We didn't have books at home when I started school that I can remember. My parents didn't have a lot of education. We lived in the country and they worked pretty hard. (Life was tough then..I just didn't know it.)I'm so thankful the Lord gave me a love of reading, which I have pasted down to my daughters. By the way, when I started school and started writing I used my left hand. The teacher didn't want any lefthanders because she wanted all the papers on our desk slanted in the same position as she went down the rows. She slapped my hand with a ruler and made me use my right hand. I use my right hand for writing, but there are some things I still do with my left hand. ( I love to see a left handed person write).


message 12: by Jennifer (new)

Jennifer (jennafraugh) | 4102 comments Ausjenny wrote: "I did love reading but I also struggled with it. like spelling. I still have trouble spelling.
I have a friend who helped with support for kids who need extra help at school. She helped with the sp..."


Yeah, if you can visually see it, then you have no problem spelling. Some people are just made that way, where others have to work for it.

Of course there were those who loved reading when younger, but never had teachers along the way that encouraged that or made it fun. Kinda sad when you think about it. They say that how much a person develops with reading and writing determines how well they do successfully in society. Kinda interesting how everything comes down to those two subjects.


message 13: by Jennifer (new)

Jennifer (jennafraugh) | 4102 comments Patsy wrote: "I don't exactly who taught me to read and how. Had to be just by going to school. We didn't have kindergarden back then so I was 5 when I started school. (Because of late birthday) We didn't have b..."

That's horrible! You don't take a child's natural ability to write with their left hand away from them. I would have been the stubborn one that still used their left hand even if she did slap it. lol


message 14: by Jennifer (last edited Sep 13, 2010 01:07PM) (new)

Jennifer (jennafraugh) | 4102 comments Ausjenny wrote:"I do think the phonics way we learnt is much better than how they have been teaching here up til recently (where you write like it sounds but doesn't matter if its spelt wrong)
If I had learnt like that I would have had no hope!
Not sure how its been done in America." )


It depends on the teacher. They say for younger kids that it's easier just to let them write it how it sounds and correct them later because you want them to understand the concept of how letters make sounds to make words that turn into sentences. Phonics works for some kids and for some it doesn't. That's why the tell you to teach several different ways...through literature, writing own stories, phonics(bottom-top (phonics), top-bottom(the whole paragraph and then breaking it down), interactive(combination of the two.)



message 15: by Ausjenny (new)

Ausjenny | 4954 comments Here they have found that the spelling like they think it is and not correcting has caused more problems so they are back to the old fashioned way.
We had a friends whos child wanted to know if she spelt a word wrong but because it was taught not to correct them at that age she would get really frustrated.
I had a good memory (just couldn't spell) we did have the sight words we took home and I can remember doing that for along time.
I would have struggled id I leant to just spell as I thought it was the get corrected later.
I have a friend who was illiterate she went through school without it being picked up (which isn't as uncommon as people think) it was year 10 I think it was found out by then she was at the point of leaving cos it was just to hard. She could draw and was good at that but writing and reading she couldn't do it.

She ended up going to adult literacy classes to learn to read and write. I would get letters from her only small and they were written like they sound like
would she had wood, I cant remember others but it was like how she thought they were spelt. and sometimes took a bit to decipher it. I am proud of her doing something to learn and that someone finally helped her.


message 16: by Kathy (new)

Kathy Eberly (kathyeberly) | 138 comments I don't remember too much about learning to read (I'm pretty old) but I do remember that by second grade I was reading fairly well. My family moved three times that year but that was the grade that I began to develop my love of reading and enjoyed spelling and English by third grade.


message 17: by Laurie (new)

Laurie Kingery (goodreadscomlaurie_kingery) | 137 comments I learned in the 1st grade at school. In those days it was the look-say method, whatever that meant.


message 18: by Barbara (new)

Barbara | 518 comments Laurie, that is when they were moving away from phonics and teaching children to recognize whole words, and sometimes even sentences or phrases,rather than sounding out the words phonetically.


message 19: by Lyn (new)

Lyn (lyncote) | 1644 comments Mod
I learned to read phonetically in first grade or must have. I couldn't stand my 1st grade teacher. When I recall her, all I come up with is a big black spider! And Janet, that's so sweet about you going to school with you mom. I often thought that if they'd let me take my boy with me to school, I would have been able to continue teaching. But alas, no!


message 20: by Joy (new)

Joy I can't remember exactly, either, though I'm fairly certain it was phonics and I do remember sounding out words. I was pretty good at reading and spelling, but my teachers didn't like my handwriting! lol

Lyn, that's funny about your teacher. I can't even remember my 1st or 2nd grade teacher!


message 21: by Jennifer (new)

Jennifer (jennafraugh) | 4102 comments Hahaha...sorry guys! I think you got more than you bargained for on this thread! Didn't mean to have teaching lesson on Reading, but it's what I am mainly doing this semester and I was interested in knowing about y'all.


message 22: by Victoria (new)

Victoria Bylin (victoriabylin) | 198 comments I don't remember the moment I learned to read, but I recall being fascinated with letters in kindergarten.

I *do* remember the instant my youngest son understood the whole concept. It was a Dr. Seuss book about cars, with lines like "Red car, blue car." As he was pointing to the words and saying them, I could see the light bulb go off in his eyes. It's a precious memory.


message 23: by Jennifer (new)

Jennifer (jennafraugh) | 4102 comments Victoria wrote: "I don't remember the moment I learned to read, but I recall being fascinated with letters in kindergarten.

I *do* remember the instant my youngest son understood the whole concept. It was a Dr..."


That's the best feeling in the world...seeing them have the AH HA! Moment.


message 24: by Melody (last edited Sep 21, 2010 12:16AM) (new)

Melody | 2493 comments I seem to always have known how to read, lol. My Mom made us all Christmas stockings with our names on them, and when I was two, I would read the letters of my siblings names, and I would know what they said, and how to spell them after that. I could write my own name then too, so obviously I knew letters from a young age. :)
My Mom taught me to read read by reading the scriptures, as she did with all my siblings. And it worked wonderfully. We had scripture study every morning, and I would follow along so I could see the words as each family member would take a turn reading. When it was my turn my Mom would help me if I had any issues. I could read by the time I was in kindergarten, and I remember the books were always so easy for me! The librarian at school made me read the first page of a book to her once, because she thought there was no way I could read it, but I proved her wrong, and she let me check out anything after that! :)


message 25: by Jennifer (new)

Jennifer (jennafraugh) | 4102 comments Melody wrote: "I seem to always have known how to read, lol. My Mom made us all Christmas stockings with our names on them, and when I was two, I would read the letters of my siblings names, and I would know what..."

That's awesome!


message 26: by Laurie (new)

Laurie Kingery (goodreadscomlaurie_kingery) | 137 comments Barbara wrote: "Laurie, that is when they were moving away from phonics and teaching children to recognize whole words, and sometimes even sentences or phrases,rather than sounding out the words phonetically."

Thanks for explaining, Barbara? I'm not sure that was the best idea for most children--I was lucky enough to be transferred to Texas in second grade then and got a solid phonics background, which I think helped my writing later on. Sorry to take so long to reply-- I was at ACFW con.
Blessings, Laurie


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