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What do you dislike about the Nook?

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message 1: by Micah (new)

Micah (onemorebaker) | 1071 comments I am thinking about getting my wife a Nook for Christmas this year, early I know but I plan ahead :).
I have lurked and posted in various discussions, and reviews about the multiple E-Readers available for purchase, but have not seen any real negatives about the Nook. Without getting a real lengthy hands on it is hard to know if it has any (what I would consider) critical defects.

So Nook owners what is it that you hate most about the Nook? If anything? Give me the flaws, even small ones, please! so that I may make a better informed decision. My wife is begging you. Thanks!!!


message 2: by Sean (new)

Sean O'Hara (seanohara) | 2365 comments I don't own a Nook, and the main reason for that is because it doesn't support .txt. I mean, come on, that's the most basic format in existence. There are many sites for public domain books that only put up plain text versions.


message 3: by Micah (new)

Micah (onemorebaker) | 1071 comments Sean wrote: "I don't own a Nook, and the main reason for that is because it doesn't support .txt. I mean, come on, that's the most basic format in existence. There are many sites for public domain books that on..."

It does support open formats though right? You could buy a book from borders store and use it on the nook?


message 4: by Sandi (last edited Sep 11, 2010 09:58AM) (new)

Sandi (sandikal) | 1212 comments Do any e-readers support .txt? The standard e-book format now is epub and Nook supports that as well as pdf files. A txt file could be converted to PDF fairly easily. Project Gutenberg's books are all available in epub format as well as txt and html. I I love that the Nook, unlike the Kindle, doesn't use a proprietary format.

The only thing I don't love about my Nook is reading magazines on it. I subscribed to Analog and Asimov's Science Fiction magazines and dropped the subscriptions after one issue each. They just don't fit the way I read magazines. I like to skip around, read what interests me and go back to what I missed later.

I looked at the Kindle, the Sony Readers and the Nook and chose the Nook as the best overall reader. I liked that I can buy or get free e-books from sites other than B&N and I can get books from my public library if I can ever figure how to get logged on.

Some of the bonuses I've discovered since I got my Nook are the Free Friday books and special promotions, including a recently ended one where they offered 12 free classics a week for 9 weeks. If you go to the Nook discussion boards on B&N, you'll find that B&N does monitor them and responds quite quickly to suggestions and complaints. They are really paying attention to what their customers want.

Another thing I've discovered about the Nook is that they update the software rather than just coming out with a new Nook. There was an upgrade right after I got mine that provided a way to swipe your thumb across the touch screen to turn pages (very cool) and allows you to go to a particular page.

The price of the Nook is good too. I would recommend getting the 3G version rather than the one that is just wi-fi. You never know when you're going to want to get a book and not be near a hotspot.

There are a few minor issues, like not being able to sort in the shopping section of the Nook and not being able to really organize your library. Hopefully, they will address those issues in the next software upgrade because a lot of users are asking for it. None of the issues are deal-breakers though.


message 5: by terpkristin (new)

terpkristin | 4120 comments Sandi wrote: "Do any e-readers support .txt?"

Yes, Kindle supports both TXT and PDF (among others).

Sandi wrote: "Another thing I've discovered about the Nook is that they update the software rather than just coming out with a new Nook."

Not sure what you're getting at here, Amazon often updates Kindle software (not just releases new Kindles).

But all that aside, I know nothing about the Nook, so can't offer anything useful to add here except to correct potential misinformation. If Micah's wife wants one, probably isn't any better or worse than a Kindle, in the grand scheme (each has their own advantages and disadvantages). I'm very happy with my Kindle, but had the timing been different, I may just has easily ended up with a Nook and been equally happy.


message 6: by Sandi (new)

Sandi (sandikal) | 1212 comments I thought that other formats had to be sent to Amazon to be converted to the Amazon format before they could be uploaded. Did they change that to allow you to load them directly?


message 7: by terpkristin (new)

terpkristin | 4120 comments I have drag/dropped over USB text files and PDF. Others you send to free address and gets wirelessly delivered to Kindle. Can also send text and PDF to do that too.


message 8: by Tamahome (last edited Sep 11, 2010 10:45AM) (new)

Tamahome | 6111 comments The nook supports adobe epub, which the libraries use.


message 9: by Sean (new)

Sean O'Hara (seanohara) | 2365 comments Sandi wrote: "Do any e-readers support .txt? The standard e-book format now is epub and Nook supports that as well as pdf files. A txt file could be converted to PDF fairly easily. Project Gutenberg's books a..."

Most of them do, except Kobo, Nook, and Sony.

Sure, you can convert all kinds of things with Calibre, but why go through all those extra steps? And while Gutenberg has ePub and Mobi formats, Gutenberg Australia and Sacred Texts don't; and with Gaslight it's easiest to copy the files into a text editor and save them.


message 10: by Charles (new)

Charles (charlesh) | 13 comments Sandi wrote: "I thought that other formats had to be sent to Amazon to be converted to the Amazon format before they could be uploaded. Did they change that to allow you to load them directly?"

It's not a change, you could always load them directly. Confusion between Amazon's conversion service and the Kindle's native file formats seems to be common. Native formats are MOBI, PRC, TXT, Topaz, and PDF (Kindle 2 only). With Amazon's conversion service you could convert other formats (HTML and DOC). I prefer to use Calibre (free) instead.


message 11: by Adam (new)

Adam (jademason) | 23 comments Micah, I'm sure your wife will love the Nook, and you love you for getting her one. I have one and really like it. I would much rather tell you about all the reasons why I like it and would recommend it, but since you are specifically asking for negatives, I'll list those.

- Poor library management

I took advantage of B&N's free fridays to get a bunch of books, and I also downloaded a lot of books from manybooks.net and Gutenberg. The Nook splits your library into the B&N content and content you side-load. You can do some simple sorting on these, but it is not very convenient to search through a large collection of books for what you are looking for. Fortunately this is something that B&N can fix in a future firmware release.

- LendMe

I love the LendMe feature, and it was definitely a reason I preferred the Nook. Unfortunately, the LendMe feature is very buggy. On two occasions I've loaned a book to a user and they never received any notification that it was available. One time I loaned a book to an e-mail address that was not yet associated with a B&N account. That book went into limbo for 7 days, and even the B&N techs couldn't figure it out. This could be a great feature, but right now there are so many bugs that it can be really frustrating.

- Agency 5 Pricing

This is something true of all eBook readers, not just the Nook. The five big publishing houses have set some pretty unsavory pricing on books in electronic form. The books published by these houses are not eligible for discounts. The electronic version is often priced higher than the paperback version of that same book. It can be pretty frustrating to see The Girl Who Played With Fire is $5.59 at Wal-Mart, but $9.99 on my Nook. You will save money over newly released books only available in hardcover, but if you tend to read more paperbacks you will be spending more.

- Browser

In the latest firmware update the Nook got a browser. It is awful. It only works when you have a wifi connection, and it is really difficult to use. Still, if all you have is your Nook and an open WiFi hotspot, you can browse websites that don't use flash.


As I said, I love my Nook, and I would much rather tell you all the reasons why, but those are the negatives I've experienced with it.


message 12: by Will (last edited Sep 12, 2010 01:32AM) (new)

Will (w13rdo) | 37 comments Nook owner, and I'll echo Adams gripes, with the exception that I don't even bother using the Browser.

The library management isn't grand, but to get around this, I have my Calibre on a closet server, and fetch books when I'm ready to read them and clear them when done.

Oh, and one other thing, it doesn't yet (at least on the one I have) support multiple "users" or profiles. I let my son read on it when I'm not, and he's young and likes using a small typeface and a different font than I do. I'd really like to have some way of easily switching between some presets. (typeface and "current read" and maybe even bookmarks and such)

Oh, but I do really like my Nook, and I can definitely say that it has led to me reading more and longer.


message 13: by Joyce (new)

Joyce (eternity21) | 171 comments I really love my nook but there are a couple of things that I find annoying.

When searching or typing in the touch screen it is a bit slow to respond and I wind up going back and reentering because I went too fast. But I really don't use that feature too much to be a major problem just a minor one.

I find that if it is low on battery it tends to freeze up on the screensaver. I've learned how to reset it from the nook forums. The forums are very helpful and friendly.

I don't know how it is with the other readers but I would like to be able to delete or mark it as read without having to plug it into my computer.

One new feature I like is that they have an android app, iPhone and iPad apps so that I can sync my books and read them when I don't have my nook with me. I know they got this from the kindle but I'm glad they copied it. LOL

Hope this helps. Also if that is what she wants...don't substitute it. I know you can test out the Sony and nook readers in stores like best buy but I know of any place to get a hands on with the kindle, which to me is a drawback.


message 14: by Micah (new)

Micah (onemorebaker) | 1071 comments Thanks for the reviews guys! Just found out more information in 1 thread than I have browsing around for 2-3 weeks. Nothing sounds like a complete deal breaker to me yet. The not being able to delete things w/o being hooked up to a computer could be very annoying for my wife though.
I'll have to casually mention it in a conversation to see if that is a deal breaker for her. Don't see why it would be though...hoping I can surprise her with one under the tree this Christmas. I will probably grab one next month to make sure I have it.

If anybody has anymore hands on experience they would like to share I would love to read it. Always good to see as much as possible before making a major purchase that isn't for yourself.

Thanks Again.


message 15: by Matthew (new)

Matthew | 2 comments Micah wrote: "Thanks for the reviews guys! Just found out more information in 1 thread than I have browsing around for 2-3 weeks. Nothing sounds like a complete deal breaker to me yet. The not being able to dele..."

In regards to deleting books, you can Archive the book through the Nook, which will remove it from your device but leave it in your library so that you can download it later or Lend it after you are done.


message 16: by Stan (new)

Stan Slaughter | 359 comments Another Nook owner here.

One big deal to me about the nook is that you can walk into any Barnes & Nobles and read any book in the store for free while you are there in the store (up to an hour each day)

They were trying to give you the same experience as walking into a store, taking a book off the shelf, and reading it for a bit. There are a *lot* of B&N's where I live - so I love that feature.

What I do a lot (you could do this with a kindle too ) is to hold my reader while browsing books on the shelf. I see a cover I like and instead of reading the back of the book I use the search feature on my nook to look the book up and read the Editorial and Reader reviews. This is much better than just being able to read the back, or inside cover.

Since you are asking about bad stuff - here is something that has not been mentioned yet. The music player blows. It blows so bad that I have never even tried it (I never wanted to waste the battery life anyway).

Note: Here is the main B&N forum were most of the Nook owners gather to complain and praise:
http://bookclubs.barnesandnoble.com/t...


message 17: by Tamahome (new)

Tamahome | 6111 comments How is the spell check on the nook vs the kindle?


message 18: by Stan (new)

Stan Slaughter | 359 comments Did you mean Dictionary ? No real reason to spell check something on a read-only device :)

Never really used it on the nook - I know it has one. I expect it would be more like a collegiate dictionary than an unabridged one though.


message 19: by Matthew (new)

Matthew (masupert) | 215 comments A nook and Kindle 3 owner. I would also weigh in and say that the benefits to each device. Depending on how you read books now could influence your enjoyment of the Nook. My GF loves going to brick and mortar stores and the library. She is primarily using the Nook and taking advantage of the Overdrive support as well as B&N's specials. I have to say that B&N's special deals, like Free Book Fridays and in store deals like free coffee when you bring in your Nook are really good. They also seem to be doing a really good job with community building on their excellent blogs, forums and Facebook pages.

The Kindle community doesn't seem nearly so organized and they don't seem to advertise special deals with authors nearly as hard as the B&N folks are. .


message 20: by Jim (new)

Jim (jimherdt) | 71 comments I agree 100%. I had the 2nd gen Kindle and just upgraded to Kindle 3. I started out with the Nook, which my wife now uses. Barnes and Noble does a much better job with their E-mail, forums, and social media than Amazon. I hope they gain some traction, Kindle needs a strong competitor in the market.

BTW - I am finding the Kindle 3 just about perfect in every way. Amazon did a really nice job.

Regards, Jim

Matthew wrote: "A nook and Kindle 3 owner. I would also weigh in and say that the benefits to each device. Depending on how you read books now could influence your enjoyment of the Nook. My GF loves going to brick..."

Matthew wrote: "A nook and Kindle 3 owner. I would also weigh in and say that the benefits to each device. Depending on how you read books now could influence your enjoyment of the Nook. My GF loves going to brick..."


message 21: by Neil (new)

Neil (rucknrun) If you have documents in anything other then the Kindle format I don't think the sync feature works. I really like the idea if using epub books on my Nook. The sync feature for the Kindle is the only thing that really puts it ahead of the game. Since it would not work with most of the items I read the Nook was the way to go for me. I love it. I like options.


message 22: by Dan (new)

Dan (daniel-san) | 101 comments The Nook is a great reader, and it has so much potential for useful ways of using it due to the touch screen and Android OS, that I think the biggest flaw with it is the lack of innovation seen so far with the device. Maybe it's still early to wish for that, however.

Since it runs Android, there is no reason that B&N couldn't just install a very simple app, like "more" (for you Unix types) or something like Notepad or TextEdit, that could read anything you throw at it, even binary files. Why not? It is a reader after all.

So far, B&N just seems like they're trying to manage everything the same way Amazon manages the Kindle, which was a turn-off for me since I always thought Amazon's book list was clunky. They could do so much more with organizing your books, adding metadata to them and so on. So far it's been a missed opportunity to really use the Android platform for something neat. Wouldn't it be hilarious to see a Kindle app on the Nook? Maybe I should just jailbreak it...


message 23: by CJ (new)

CJ (cjstreetcarp) | 7 comments Neil wrote: "If you have documents in anything other then the Kindle format I don't think the sync feature works. I really like the idea if using epub books on my Nook. The sync feature for the Kindle is the ..."

I think that with Calibre you can send it to the email address of the kindle, the only thing I don't know is it will be available on other devices then also.


message 24: by Al (new)

Al | 159 comments Further commentary on critical differences in format.

http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article...


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