Historical Fictionistas discussion

131 views
Buddy Reads > Stonehenge by Bernard Cornwell

Comments Showing 1-50 of 207 (207 new)    post a comment »
« previous 1 3 4 5

message 1: by Terri (new)

Terri A couple of us are going to read Stonehenge by Bernard Cornwell starting in a week or so.

Mini read is open to all and sundry. :-) The more the merrier.


message 2: by Amy (new)

Amy | 74 comments Terri wrote: "A couple of us are going to read Stonehenge by Bernard Cornwell starting in a week or so.

Mini read is open to all and sundry. :-) The more the merrier."


Terri, I'm not sure if I have the time to get involved with the mini-read, but this book looks very interesting to me. I just finished a re-read of The Pillars of the Earth at the end of last month and I'm always looking for something that combines my two life passions, Architecture and Literature. The overall reviews on this book seem to be mixed, but I've added it to my tbr list anyway. I think it's something I'll have to see for myself. Thanks for revealing this book to me.


message 3: by Donna (new)

Donna (dfiggz) I had this book forever and always wanted to get to it but my list is super crazy! I have ARC's to get to and 2 book clubs that I am in PLUS I am a grad student with 2 babies and who works full time LOL

I will prob get to it mid October maybe I can just join in on the discussion.,.....


message 4: by Leland (new)

Leland (lesliehw) A 598 page "mini" read?!!! What's so mini? LOL.
Terri this looks great. I'm not sure I can participate but will poke around and try to fit it in.


message 5: by Felina (new)

Felina | 500 comments If I can get this mug on audiobook within 2 weeks I'll read it with you Terri!


message 6: by Terri (last edited Sep 09, 2010 03:07PM) (new)

Terri I have my fingers crossed that all you gals can squeeze this book in.
Donna (not the above Donna , but a different Donna who's also a member of our group. Look for the bright orange Dahlia avatar that looks like a Gerbera) and I are Bernard Cornwell fans, but have never gotten around to reading Stonehenge. I can't speak for Donna, but I have no idea what to expect.
The reviews are mixed about it as Amy said above, so that adds to the mystery. Cornwell is an absolutely brilliant writer, so the writing must be okay. Maybe it is the story that is the problem.
I think it would be great if a bunch of us could have a go at this book together.
We'll really sort out if it is any good or not, I'd say.

I have sometimes wondered whether some people didn't get into it because they have no interest in pre-historic Britain or in Stonehenge.

Felina. It will also be interesting if Felina can get it on audio. To see how different it will read that way. Boring...or not boring. I guess it will be an abridged version?

Leslie. I know *snort* 598 pages doesn't sound to much like a mini read. I'll have to check my copy and see if the writing is big or little. I am sure it is big, so it is not one of those reeeeally long small paperbacks. :-)

Poor Donna (the other Donna, the Donna that posted above - confusing...). I would not swap your schedule for anything. What an amazing role model for women you are. Raising babies, working full time AND a Grad.
Maybe you'd have better luck with an audio from the library or downloaded to an ipod?
Either way. I am a fairly slow reader so will still be reading this book by mid October.
It does involve the construction of Stonehenge.....I am sure....??? I am forgetting the blurb on the back of the book. And Cornwell is an IMPECCABLE researcher so you will likely experience the architectural side of things.


message 7: by Felina (last edited Sep 09, 2010 03:16PM) (new)

Felina | 500 comments Boring...or not boring. I guess it will be an abridged version?

The one at my library is not abridged although I can only get it through their software thing that I've never been able to work. I think I'll probably get it with my audible credits. Audible has one read by Cornwell himself and another one read by some random. Usually authors are boring when they read their own work since they are masters at writing not reading like the people who are paid to read for audiobooks. There are a few exceptions but I'd rather not risk it. A poor reader can ruin a book but a good reader just adds to it.


message 8: by Maude (new)

Maude | 834 comments I, too, have to take off my proverbial hat to you Donna (with two kids). You are WOMAN!


message 9: by Donna (last edited Sep 09, 2010 05:21PM) (new)

Donna | 39 comments Bright orange Donna here.... hello everyone. I ditto the sentiments about the "other" Donna. I'm exhausted just thinking about your schedule!

Felina, it would be awesome if you got it on audio. I would be very interested to see how it compares. I just joined Audible and downloaded my very first audiobook myself. I just could not get through The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo when I tried reading it and now I'm enjoying it much more! (Of course the fact that I saw the movie doesn't hurt either).


Leslie, Maude, and Amy, it would be great if you can join us at some point. You don't have to start at the same time. I don't think ANY of us know EXACTLY when we are starting! LOL


message 10: by Terri (last edited Sep 09, 2010 08:38PM) (new)

Terri I had a look at Audible the other day.
I think one day I might join, but for now I am up to my eyeballs in hardcopy books (normal paper books) that In don't think I could fit in an audio.
I am keeping it in mind for when I go on my next road trip which will probably be early next year. Hubby and I love roadtrips. Audio books are good for them.


message 11: by Donna (new)

Donna | 39 comments Terri, I agree that a road trip would be the perfect time for an audiobook! I have a hard time finding the right opportunity to listen to mine since I tend to read either a "real" book or my kindle when I have time. So far, the best time for me to listen to the audiobook is when I'm doing housework - cleaning, laundry, dishes, etc.

BTW, in reference to your above post about Stonehenge, I personally am facinated with the REAL Stonehenge and have read many novels that have it in them... King Arthur, early pagans, druids, etc. Since no one seems to know exactly what it's for or who built it, it has had some interesting theories involved with it's existence.

I'm not sure if I read Stonehenge before or not, but if I did, it was so long ago I have no recollection of the book. I'm actually looking forward to reading it (again???).


message 12: by Donna (new)

Donna (dfiggz) THX Terri and the "other" Donna (or Bright Orange Donna - I can be known as Wione Donna??) I do have a crazy schedule and may just think about the audio but I love the physical book but it does make sense. I will let you know if I don it.


message 13: by Felina (new)

Felina | 500 comments I love audiobooks. I get to listen to them at work and I usually listen to one in the car, when I exercise and when I get ready in the morning. However, if the book has a lot of strange named characters and jumps around between plots audibooks are just to hard. I started A Song for Arbonne on audiobook but there are 20 different trubadors and their names are very similar and I kept getting confused. I had to switch over to the book so I could 'see' the names. ha ha


message 14: by Amy (new)

Amy | 74 comments Felina wrote: "I love audiobooks. I get to listen to them at work and I usually listen to one in the car, when I exercise and when I get ready in the morning. However, if the book has a lot of strange named chara..."

Felina, you should be careful with books that have at least 20 different troubadors. You might have been okay with 12-15, but 20? I'm just sayin'. (ha, ha...I couldn't resist being snarky.)


message 15: by Felina (new)

Felina | 500 comments There are actually only 3 but I like to exaggerate. ;)


message 16: by Terri (new)

Terri Okay, Wione Donna it is. I was thinking of nicknaming bright orange Donna, The Orange Dahlia. Like the Black Dahlia, but less gruesome. Brighter, cheerier. More alive.


message 17: by Chris (new)

Chris  (haughtc) I picked up Stonehenge at the library today....


message 18: by Terri (new)

Terri YAAAAYYYY!! Excellent! Welcome aboard, Chris.
Are you going to start in a week or two, or start straight away?


message 19: by Chris (new)

Chris  (haughtc) I've got two books I need to finish up, hopefully this weekend. Then I might get a jump/head start on it while I have it handy.


message 20: by Terri (new)

Terri Cool. Well, no big spoilers too early. :-)


message 21: by Terri (last edited Sep 10, 2010 10:54PM) (new)

Terri I decided to put this amazon link here for those undecided. You can 'look inside' the book and read some of it to see if you think it will interest you.
http://www.amazon.com/Stonehenge-Bern...


message 22: by Terri (new)

Terri Welcome aboard to you too, Nicola. ;-)


message 23: by Terri (new)

Terri I know Chris and Felina have already started Stonehenge. Anyone else started yet?

I'll be starting in a day or two as I am making good time on the book I am currently reading.


message 24: by Amy (new)

Amy | 74 comments Terri wrote: "I know Chris and Felina have already started Stonehenge. Anyone else started yet?

I'll be starting in a day or two as I am making good time on the book I am currently reading."


Terri: I know I'm tempted to start this book sooner than I thought and knowing that others are starting is quite an incentive. I've been reading a lot of "current" HF (1900s) lately, so a change of time and place might be a really good thing. Also, I'm curious to see if I'll like Bernard Cornwell's writing. So many have spoken so highly about him, I really should check it out for myself.


message 25: by Donna (new)

Donna | 39 comments Terri said: I was thinking of nicknaming bright orange Donna, The Orange Dahlia. Like the Black Dahlia, but less gruesome. Brighter, cheerier. More alive.

LOL ... "more alive". Terri, you are a trip!

At this rate, seeing that a lot of you are starting or are going to start very soon, I may have to ditch Eat, Pray, Love (which I'm finding kinda boring, BTW, though I admit I'm not too far into it), and start Stonehenge sooner rather than later!


message 26: by Kate (new)

Kate Quinn | 591 comments "Stonehenge" was the only book of Cornwell's I wasn't crazy about - maybe because early tribal man isn't an era that much interests me. I think I might try it again though . . .


message 27: by Silver (new)

Silver The book looks familair, I will see if I can find it on my bookshelves, and if I do have it, I will try and squeeze it into my reading.


message 28: by Terri (new)

Terri I finished The Lion of Cairo last night! Couldn't sleep, so I got some good solid reading hours done.

I am starting Stonehenge today.
Yay. :-)


message 29: by Silver (new)

Silver My suspipsions were correct. As it turns out, I do own a copy of this book. I started reading today.


message 30: by Terri (last edited Sep 12, 2010 08:04PM) (new)

Terri awesome, Silver. :-)


What about you Amy? Starting soon too?

Any of you who have never read a Cornwall novel. If you don't like Stonehenge, don't give up on him. I'll tell you once I have read Stonehenge what my feelings are when comparing it to his other novels.
His other stuff is very good.


message 31: by Kate (new)

Kate Quinn | 591 comments I agree. Stonehenge is my least favorite of his books, but the others rank in my top tier of fiction, not just historical.


message 32: by Silver (new)

Silver Well at least this book as cleared up one of the mysteries of the modern world. Why rapers are always grabbing their crotch.

Now I know, they are just warding off evil spirits.

Sorry, I know its bad of me, but I could not resist.


message 33: by Terri (new)

Terri Haa! Nice one, Silver. Of course. It's a spiritual thing.

I want to stab Lengar.


message 34: by Felina (new)

Felina | 500 comments I'm just a hair over 100 pages into this book and I am loving it. If it is truly the 'worst' of Cornwall's books then I'm happy that I read it first. Now its all up hill from here.


message 35: by Silver (new)

Silver Felina wrote: "I'm just a hair over 100 pages into this book and I am loving it. If it is truly the 'worst' of Cornwall's books then I'm happy that I read it first. Now its all up hill from here."

Haha yeah I agree, I have not got that far yet, but I am already really enjoying it.


message 36: by Terri (new)

Terri Yeah, what they said!
I am about 60 pages in and I am also loving it.
Poor Camabam. :-)
Damn Lengar! :-|
Sweet Saban who's going to be a hottie when he grows up. :-)

I really enjoy the explanations of thetemple sites, ring ditches and the earthworks around the village. With the skulls along the top to ward off baddies. (I took a guess that that wasn't really a spoiler just then).
I have watched quite a few doco's and archaeology shows on Stonehenge and pre historic man in Britain and their associated structures - ring forts/ditches, henges - and I am being drawn into Cornwall's descriptions of the landscape. To have it explained and laid out like this is sweeping me back in time.
****little spoiler****not mega though****
I also liked Cornwall's take on the hunter.
There really was a skeleton found buried in one of the outer rings at Stonehenge. He still had the flint arrowheads in him. I liked the story Cornwall wrote around this pre historic man. I have always had my own imaginings of how he got there, why he had so many arrow wounds, and why they buried him there.


message 37: by Silver (new)

Silver Terri wrote: "Yeah, what they said!
I am about 60 pages in and I am also loving it.
Poor Camabam. :-)
Damn Lengar! :-|
Sweet Saban who's going to be a hottie when he grows up. :-)..."


I have to admit even though on the whole I do not care for Lengar, when he confronted his father abother the gold, I found myself having to admit that he did make some good points.

What is Hengall doing for his people with all that treature and gold that he just keeps burried away and dosen't even use.

And though on the one hand there is some value to wanting to keep peace and be diplomatic, on the other hand for a warrior he seems kind of like a coward, and considering the enviroement they live in, it seems he is making his people weak and vulnerable to enemy threats.


message 38: by Terri (new)

Terri Don't forget to do this*****spoiler***** when we talk about the book in any detail LOL :-)

*******************Spoiler***********************
I totally agree! I thought the exact same thing at the time. His arguments were valid. What is the point of burying it in his hut? He should wear it at least, and let his favourite women wear it so that the whole village gets to admire the gold. I understand Hengall wanting peace. But he can have peace and still let his people enjoy the treasure.


message 39: by Silver (new)

Silver **slight spoiler***

Not to mention, even if he does not want to activly go to war, when they know there are rival clans lurking around, it would not hurt to use some of the gold for warrior to at least help protect the village should there be an attack.


message 40: by Terri (new)

Terri *********little spoilers***********
That's true. He's made a bad choice concerning the gold. Only thing is. Lengar is a bad seed. I am not looking forward to the day that he becomes chieftain.
I wonder what he'll do to Saban.


message 41: by Felina (last edited Sep 13, 2010 10:01PM) (new)

Felina | 500 comments **Maybe spoiler**

You ladies will find that he has very good reason for not wanting to make war with Cathallo.


message 42: by Terri (new)

Terri Ohhhhhhh. I shall keep reading.......


message 43: by Felina (new)

Felina | 500 comments ****Actual spoiler****

In fact, I think Hengar might be a brilliant chieftain. He certainly has the mind set of the European royalty to follow him. Ha ha.


message 44: by Terri (new)

Terri ho ho.
Now I am curious!


message 45: by Amy (new)

Amy | 74 comments I've been totally preoccupied by "life" the past couple of days, but now I think I'm ready to dedicate some quality time to reading again. I have a little left to read in The Piano Teacher, then I'll be ready to start Stonehenge. So, hang on, I'm coming! :)


message 46: by Donna (new)

Donna | 39 comments Amy, you're not alone... I'm still coming too! (humming a few bars of "Hold on, I'm coming. Hold on, I'm coming" by Sam and Dave.)

For all of those not quite ready to begin, don't let a few "speedsters" stop you. There are a few of us still lagging behind.

OK, you guys who have started already - stop rubbing it in! lol


message 47: by Felina (new)

Felina | 500 comments I just started early cause I tend to be a slow reader and a lot of people were saying it wasn't very good so I expected to slog through it. But turns out its kinda awesome...hence the head start.


message 48: by Terri (last edited Sep 14, 2010 02:32PM) (new)

Terri Aww Amy and Donna (The Orange Dahlia)!!! I wish, wish, wish you were reading this too right now. Trying so hard to hold back my spoilers. :-0
Sigh.

________________________
*******************little spoiler*******************
I actually find some of Cornwells descriptions of these people humorous. The crotch grabbing to ward of evil spirits (glad the girls do it too) and the short burst of dancing they do to enter the ring circles as they approach the neighbours. The little bursts of dancing cracked me up.


message 49: by Felina (new)

Felina | 500 comments I just love all the descriptions of their religious practices. Seems so pointless in our society now. Its really interesting to read about a people who spend almost every waking moment in contemplation and adherence to their gods. Its so contrary to our life now.


message 50: by Terri (new)

Terri Their innocence is endearing. I am quite touched by it.


« previous 1 3 4 5
back to top