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2010/11 Group Reads - Archives > Nominations for "All Hallow's Eve" or "Samhain" 2010

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Captain Sir Roddy, R.N. (Ret.) (captain_sir_roddy) | 1483 comments Mod
How many of you would be interested in nominating your favorite short spooky or creepy story for reading and discussion in celebration of 'All Hallow's Eve' and the Celtic 'Samhain'? If so, please post a note here with your nominations. The only requests that I make are that (1) make sure that your nomination is available on-line; and (2) that your story or author fit within our time-period.

So, nominations are now open, and will remain open until October 8th. I'll put a list together, and we can vote for the story through October 15th. Lobbying with the use of little 'teasers' is encouraged. Tell us why we should want to read your nomination. Use your 'magic' to bend folks to your will! I will post the link to the winning story after the voting is concluded, and you can begin reading.

Finally, I suggest that we start the group read and discussion on 'All Hallows Eve' (October 31st) and conclude on 'Bonfire Night' (November 5th).

So, what do you all think? Am I just being silly?


message 2: by Historybuff93 (new)

Historybuff93 | 287 comments I think it's a great idea!

I nominate Poe's The Black Cat.


Captain Sir Roddy, R.N. (Ret.) (captain_sir_roddy) | 1483 comments Mod
Historybuff93 wrote: "I think it's a great idea!

I nominate Poe's The Black Cat."


Terrific! And a great choice!


message 4: by MadgeUK (last edited Sep 08, 2010 11:32PM) (new)

MadgeUK | 5214 comments Good idea! I will make some Yorkshire Parkin and Bonfire Toffee:).

What about one from our period and one which is particularly relevant to Jan: The Withered Arm by Thomas Hardy' which, incidentally, starts with a little poem about a Milkmaid:)


http://collections.vam.ac.uk/item/O16...


Captain Sir Roddy, R.N. (Ret.) (captain_sir_roddy) | 1483 comments Mod
MadgeUK wrote: "Good idea! I will make some Yorkshire Parkin and Bonfire Toffee:).

What about one from our period and one which is particularly relevant to Jan: The Withered Arm by Thomas Hardy' which, inciden..."


Oh yes, very good choice, Madge! Poor Jan, I don't think she likes that title, 'The Withered Arm,' at all. ;-)


message 6: by MadgeUK (new)

MadgeUK | 5214 comments She'll be writing a poem about it! :D.


message 7: by Jan (new)

Jan (auntyjan) | 483 comments I broke my arm
And while it set
Discovered the joys
Of the internet.

Whenever I am tempted to grumble about my broken arm, I remind myself about how this has slowed me down enough to:
1. Discover Goodreads
2. Start reading novels again
3. Reconnect with my creative side...I had written no poetry for thirty years except for two songs.
4. Join in literary discussions with like-minded people
5. Make friends with other booklovers from around the world
6. Learn an enormous amount
7. Do a lot of armchair travel
8. Read some of the best classic poetry
9. Play a lot of fun games
10.Hear about cup-flipping cats

All in all, I'm sure I'll cope if we study The Withered Arm...it was just that on the first day that it was mentioned I'd just had an X-ray which showed that one piece of bone had not healed, so I have a dead piece of bone inside my arm.

If I didn't break my arm
One thing is certain that...
I never would have heard about
That small cup-flipping cat!

Thanks everyone ...you are the best bunch...I've certainly found my 'tribe'!


message 8: by MadgeUK (new)

MadgeUK | 5214 comments Well put Jan and I am sure all of us are glad to have found our Poet Laureate:):)


message 9: by Linda2 (new)

Linda2 | 3744 comments There's a story by Roald Dahl I read years ago, that would qualify, in fact many of his stories qualify. It's about a father who reads a spooky Halloween story about a witch to his little girl, but I can't reveal the twist ending. Anyone know the name? Of course, it's still under copyright.


message 10: by MadgeUK (new)

MadgeUK | 5214 comments Doesn't it have to be a story from between 1800-1910?


Captain Sir Roddy, R.N. (Ret.) (captain_sir_roddy) | 1483 comments Mod
MadgeUK wrote: "Doesn't it have to be a story from between 1800-1910?"

Uh, yes, it does.


message 12: by Linda2 (new)

Linda2 | 3744 comments Oops, I forgot. I belong to too many book groups.


message 13: by Linda2 (last edited Sep 13, 2010 11:10PM) (new)

Linda2 | 3744 comments "The Black Cat--we've probably all read it several times over. Let's try something new.

Wharton wrote some great ghost stories, of which I've read a few, and this site says many were published in the 1910's. They're all in one volume and online.

http://www.suite101.com/content/the-g...

http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/23...


message 14: by Linda2 (last edited Sep 13, 2010 10:24PM) (new)

Linda2 | 3744 comments A partial list of horror stories in the public domain, with links to the texts. Classic writers are on the right. I'd like us to choose something with which we're not familiar, since these usually have a twist ending:

http://horrormasters.com/


message 15: by Linda2 (new)

Linda2 | 3744 comments I nominate "Afterward" by Edith Wharton (1910)


Captain Sir Roddy, R.N. (Ret.) (captain_sir_roddy) | 1483 comments Mod
Rochelle wrote: "I nominate "Afterward" by Edith Wharton (1910)"

Great story, Rochelle!


message 17: by Everyman (new)

Everyman | 3582 comments Rochelle wrote: "I'd like us to choose something with which we're not familiar, since these usually have a twist ending:..."

Good thought.


message 18: by Jan (new)

Jan (auntyjan) | 483 comments Everyman wrote: "Rochelle wrote: "I'd like us to choose something with which we're not familiar, since these usually have a twist ending:..."

Good thought."

They're all unfamiliar to me, so any would suit...I'm even getting a little curious about The Withered Arm.


message 19: by Historybuff93 (last edited Sep 15, 2010 03:46PM) (new)

Historybuff93 | 287 comments Too bad H.P. Lovecraft doesn't fit into the category (a few decades too late). He wrote some quite haunting stories that, IMHO, are on par with Poe. The story Fact Concerning the Late Arthur Jermyn and His Family comes to mind.


message 20: by Linda2 (new)

Linda2 | 3744 comments Check out this link at horrormasteres.com, and let's get some more nominations.

http://www.horrormasters.com/Themes/h...

E.F. Benson wrote some of his stuff before 1910.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edward_F...


Captain Sir Roddy, R.N. (Ret.) (captain_sir_roddy) | 1483 comments Mod
PLEASE NOTE

Okay, it is time to 'rock-and-roll' with our "All Hallow's Eve" and "Samhain" short story read!

Nominations for a scary, spooky, or macabre short story are still open and will remain open through October 6th. Two rules apply:
(1) the story must generally fall within our time period; and
(2) the short story must be available on-line for folks to download and print, if desired.
I will compile the final list of nominated stories, and create a poll on October 7th. Voting on the poll will remain open through October 13th. Lobbying will be encouraged. ;-)

The short story group read will commence on October 31st (All Hallow's Eve) and run through November 5th (Samhain).

So far, we have the following nominations; and I'm also including who originally nominated it--
"The Black Cat" Edgar Allen Poe (Historybuff)
"The Withered Arm" Thomas Hardy (Madge)
"The Wedding Knell" Nathaniel Hawthorne (Ami)
"Afterward" Edith Wharton (Rochelle)
"The Fiddler of the Reels" Thomas Hardy (Chris)
Now, for those of you who I've listed above, please feel free to change your nommie, if desired. Just post your new choice, and I'll eliminate the one listed above.

For the rest of you, have fun posting your scary short story nomination!


message 22: by MadgeUK (new)

MadgeUK | 5214 comments As there are two Hardy's there, how about me substituting mine for Dicken's classic ghost story The Signal Man? (Or any other of his ghost stories.)


Captain Sir Roddy, R.N. (Ret.) (captain_sir_roddy) | 1483 comments Mod
MadgeUK wrote: "As there are two Hardy's there, how about me substituting mine for Dicken's classic ghost story The Signal Man? (Or any other of his ghost stories.)"

You certainly may do as you like, Madge. Confirm your desire and I will make the change. If you do, I may keep "The Withered Arm" under my name and drop "The Fiddler of the Reels." One almost thinks that we need to have "The Withered Arm" on the list for our dear Jan to contemplate. ;-)


message 24: by Everyman (new)

Everyman | 3582 comments MadgeUK wrote: "As there are two Hardy's there, how about me substituting mine for Dicken's classic ghost story The Signal Man? (Or any other of his ghost stories.)"

What's wrong with two Hardys? :)


Captain Sir Roddy, R.N. (Ret.) (captain_sir_roddy) | 1483 comments Mod
Everyman wrote: "MadgeUK wrote: "As there are two Hardy's there, how about me substituting mine for Dicken's classic ghost story The Signal Man? (Or any other of his ghost stories.)"

What's wrong with two Hardys? :)"


Not a bloomin' thing in my book! ;-)


message 26: by Jan (new)

Jan (auntyjan) | 483 comments It all depends how 'Hardy' you are!


Hardy ha ha !


message 27: by Joanna (new)

Joanna (joannamauselina) | 15 comments The scariest short story I ever read was "The Monkey's Paw" by WW Jacobs. It was written on 1902, and so qualifies.


message 28: by Linda2 (new)

Linda2 | 3744 comments A good choice.


message 29: by MadgeUK (new)

MadgeUK | 5214 comments Joanna wrote: "The scariest short story I ever read was "The Monkey's Paw" by WW Jacobs. It was written on 1902, and so qualifies."

Ooh yes, very scary - I remember acting in that one when I was at school:O:O.


message 30: by Linda2 (new)

Linda2 | 3744 comments Were you the ghost, Madge, or the monkey's paw?


message 31: by MadgeUK (new)

MadgeUK | 5214 comments Can't remember! I do remember that the teacher's procured a real rabbit's paw, which horrified me! And we made the blood by using cochineal from the domestic science department... I don't remember anything else - it must have been very traumatic! LOL.


message 32: by Captain Sir Roddy, R.N. (Ret.), Founder (last edited Sep 27, 2010 09:36AM) (new)

Captain Sir Roddy, R.N. (Ret.) (captain_sir_roddy) | 1483 comments Mod
Just checking in on the nominations for our 'scary short story' read. Here's what we have so far:
"The Black Cat" Edgar Allen Poe (Historybuff)
"The Signal Man" Charles Dickens (Madge)
"The Wedding Knell" Nathaniel Hawthorne (Ami)
"Afterward" Edith Wharton (Rochelle)
"The Withered Arm" Thomas Hardy (Chris)
"The Monkey's Paw" W.W. Jacobs (Joanna)
"The Spectre Bride" William Harrison Ainsworth (Sharon)
Nominations remain open until October 6th, so there's still time for those of you who haven't submitted your short story suggestion. Cheers!


message 33: by [deleted user] (new)

I would like to nominate "The Spectre Bride" by William Harrison Ainsworth. (I haven't read any Ainsworth, so I really can't vouch for the story, but the title sounds good!)

Has anyone here read Ainsworth? I have Rookwood downloaded on my Nook, but haven't read it.


Captain Sir Roddy, R.N. (Ret.) (captain_sir_roddy) | 1483 comments Mod
Sharon wrote: "I would like to nominate "The Spectre Bride" by William Harrison Ainsworth. (I haven't read any Ainsworth, so I really can't vouch for the story, but the title sounds good!)

Has anyone here rea..."


Thank you, Sharon. I shall add "The Spectre Bride" to the list right now. Cheers!


message 35: by Linda2 (last edited Sep 27, 2010 11:26AM) (new)

Linda2 | 3744 comments The Ainsworth story is online:

http://www.litgothic.com/Texts/spectr...

And some background on Ainsworth:

http://www.litgothic.com/Authors/ains...

I've read a great many ghost stories in collections, getting a taste of Blackwood, Matheson, Lovecraft, de Maupassant, etc. On nights when I don't care to devote myself to anything lengthy or serious, I grab a collection before bed. For anyone who loves such collections, Marvin Kaye has edited and compiled a slew of them, and most libraries carry them. Barnes and Noble has also gathered collections with their own reprint publishing company.

Reading a story online is OK if you don't have a printed copy, but nothing beats having it in your hand, especially if you have to go back to find clues to the ending.


message 36: by [deleted user] (new)

Thanks for the background link on Ainsworth, Rochelle - looks like I need to move Rookwood up on my TBR list!


Captain Sir Roddy, R.N. (Ret.) (captain_sir_roddy) | 1483 comments Mod
Nominations are closed, and the poll is posted and available for voting!


Captain Sir Roddy, R.N. (Ret.) (captain_sir_roddy) | 1483 comments Mod
Today is, I believe, the last day to vote on the 'spooky' short story selection. It looks a dead-heat between two of my favorite authors, Edith Wharton and Thomas Hardy. If it should end this way, I am wondering if those of you planning to participate might like to go ahead and read and discuss BOTH of the stories. Neither story is terribly long, and both are delightfully spooky. Having read both of them, I think we could safely manage reading both. Anyway, lets see what happens, but give it some thought. ;-) Cheers!


message 39: by Linda2 (new)

Linda2 | 3744 comments Let's let Jan moderate The Withered Arm. :D


message 40: by Linda2 (new)

Linda2 | 3744 comments Voting is through the 15th.


message 41: by Linda2 (new)

Linda2 | 3744 comments Madge, Wharton's story takes place in Dorsetshire. Is that your area?


Captain Sir Roddy, R.N. (Ret.) (captain_sir_roddy) | 1483 comments Mod
Rochelle wrote: "Voting is through the 15th."

Voting on the short story is through the 13th, Rochelle; and for the the Group Read No. 2, the voting closed on the 11th.

See post #22, above, for the short story instructions.

See post #1 here http://www.goodreads.com/topic/show/4... for the instructions for the Group Read No. 2.


message 43: by Linda2 (last edited Oct 13, 2010 08:58AM) (new)

Linda2 | 3744 comments Quoting your post #1 above: "So, nominations are now open, and will remain open until October 8th. I'll put a list together, and we can vote for the story through October 15th."

then you changed it. OK.


Captain Sir Roddy, R.N. (Ret.) (captain_sir_roddy) | 1483 comments Mod
Rochelle wrote: "Quoting your post #1 above: "So, nominations are now open, and will remain open until October 8th. I'll put a list together, and we can vote for the story through October 15th."

then you changed ..."


Well, hang it all! ;-) Oh well! You are right, and then I did change it! ;-) Good catch, Rochelle!

I just looked at my hand-written notes in my notebook, and I have the 13th there too. Too many dates, and the fact that I am a 'Bear of little brain.'


message 45: by [deleted user] (new)

Christopher wrote: "Rochelle wrote: "Quoting your post #1 above: "So, nominations are now open, and will remain open until October 8th. I'll put a list together, and we can vote for the story through October 15th."

..."


No the problem is you've been captured by the Greek playrights (and Homer) :D They are apparently unwilling to share your brain with other petty details.


message 46: by Linda2 (last edited Oct 13, 2010 09:12AM) (new)

Linda2 | 3744 comments Anyway, I've just re-read Afterward, and it blew me away as much as the first time. Plenty time to read about Jan's arm, uh, The Withered Arm.


Captain Sir Roddy, R.N. (Ret.) (captain_sir_roddy) | 1483 comments Mod
Rochelle wrote: "Anyway, I've just re-read Afterward, and it blew me away as much as the first time. Plenty time to read about Jan's arm, uh, The Withered Arm."

I did precisely the same thing a couple of days ago, Rochelle! I had forgotten how amazing that story was. And that it takes place in Hardy Country (Dorset) is just an added bonus. I do hope that everybody is 'on-board' with reading them both?


message 48: by MadgeUK (new)

MadgeUK | 5214 comments I have been disappointed with the lack of participation in the Adam Bede reading so will not bother to read either of these short stories, particularly as I do not like short stories anyway. Sorry.


message 49: by Loretta (new)

Loretta (lorettalucia) Is the plan actually to read and discuss these on Halloween? Having never read either, I think I'll join in at least for one...


message 50: by Linda2 (new)

Linda2 | 3744 comments Loretta wrote: "Is the plan actually to read and discuss these on Halloween? Having never read either, I think I'll join in at least for one..."
Yes.


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