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message 1: by Marieke, Former guide & Chief Chatterbox (new)

Marieke | 2838 comments Mod
I'm still contemplating which dish to post here...there are too many to choose from. perhaps lots of people will post suggestions!

incidentally, i watched Anthony Bourdain visit Egypt this morning. his comments about the traffic made me laugh. but more importantly many of the dishes he tried at various places inspired me to get this thread started.

i love ful mudammas, i never had koshari, and i don't think i'm up to stuffing squab...so based on this clip i am seriously considering giving koshari a try.

and for the record, tony really should have gone to the pyramids despite his tourist aversion. i was not excited to go see them but was absolutely blown away. i went in december, though, and most of the tourists were actually egyptian schoolchildren, which i thought was really cool.


Petra is pretending crumbs are the whole loaf (petra-x) I made foul mesdames last night in the slow cooker. Only problem with foul mesdames is... gas.


message 3: by Cindy (new)

Cindy (newtomato) | 10 comments Oh, yum, I love ful/foul!


message 4: by Marieke, Former guide & Chief Chatterbox (new)

Marieke | 2838 comments Mod
Petra X wrote: "I made foul mesdames last night in the slow cooker. Only problem with foul mesdames is... gas."

LOL!! so tasty it's worth it.
how did you do it in the slow cooker? can you post your recipe here? i'd love to try it.


Petra is pretending crumbs are the whole loaf (petra-x) Haven't had current properly here since last Sunday as Hurricane Earl mashed the place up.


message 6: by Marieke, Former guide & Chief Chatterbox (new)

Marieke | 2838 comments Mod
oh shoot. we only got clouds and a few drops from Earl. i'm really sorry to hear that he stopped by your place. last i heard Fiona is fizzling out, so perhaps that's good news. i hope you have everything up and running again quickly!


message 7: by Petra is pretending crumbs are the whole loaf (last edited Sep 06, 2010 11:40AM) (new)

Petra is pretending crumbs are the whole loaf (petra-x) Foul Medames

A pack of fava beans,
lot of garlic cloves, skinned but not chopped
7-8 cups of boiling water (I put in 4 measuring jugs full so its about that). Cold water is traditional.
Cumin to taste, tiny pinch of thyme.

Zaatar is traditional but I haven't got any.

Put everything in a slow cooker and leave it for about 12 hours until the beans are quite soft or even very soft (not al dente).

Chop up a very large onion and microwave it on half power for 15 minutes. You can leave the skin on and chop it afterwards (but it will take longer to cook) if you prefer, until its soft and melts. It makes onions sweeter than any other way of cooking.

And onion, salt, fresh-ground black pepper, about half a cup or so of extra virgin olive oil and a lot of lemon juice, about 4 small lemons. It really works best with fresh lemons not bottled juice. Mash up everything by hand with a potato masher until it is just slightly mashed and still very lumpy. Serve drizzled with more olive oil, with quartered hard-boiled eggs, pitas, roti or esh tanoor, or any other flat bread. You can drizzle it with thin tehini, decorate it with parsley and serve it with harif or hot sauce.

I actually used half a pack of fava beans and half a pack of 10-beans because that was what I had. I cook for myself so I don't stick to recipes once I know what something should taste like.


message 8: by Andrea (new)

Andrea | 660 comments I've never actually cooked fava beans, but from cooking lots of other types of beans, and having a hubby who's a plant scientist, I've picked up a couple of tips to make beans a little more friendly. First tip, don't cook beans in the soaking water. If you pour boiling water on the beans and leave to soak, and then change the water, apparently you get rid of some of that "gassy" chemical. Another precaution a bit out of place here, red kidney beans particularly require cooking at a high temp. to get rid of a potentially harmful chemical. So they should be boiled on a stovetop, not put in a slowcooker. Of course, you could cook them and then put them in the slowcooker for a while. This is only for red kidney beans,but the chemical is potentially deadly if you eat enough beans, or don't eat other things with them.

Petra, the idea of microwaving the onion to soften it is neat. I've never heard of that before.


message 9: by Alex (last edited Sep 07, 2010 07:06AM) (new)

Alex Wait, so foul mesdames are vegetarian? I might try that with my vegetarian wife. And I'll try your tips too, Andrea, those are really interesting.

I gotta track down some zaatar, I guess. There's an African grocery place in Brookline that we've gotten berbere at.

And yeah, sorry to hear Earl got to you. (I mean, of course it did.) Here in Boston everyone totally freaked out and bought 300 gallons of bottled water and then it, like, drizzled a little. People are such sissies here.


message 10: by Marieke, Former guide & Chief Chatterbox (new)

Marieke | 2838 comments Mod
Cooking beans with kelp helps too. I don't know why!

Yes, ful (which is just the Arabic name for fava) is veggie. Eggs are optional. Koshari is also vegetarian. Lots of Egyptian food is vegetarian!


message 11: by Niledaughter (new)

Niledaughter | 88 comments hello all , I am new :)

wow Koshari & foul !
you entreated the heart of Egypt , very nice discussion :D

Petra X :
delicious recipe for Medames !


message 12: by Marieke, Former guide & Chief Chatterbox (new)

Marieke | 2838 comments Mod
Hi Nile daughter! I'm so happy to see you posting. :D

also I'm relieved that an Egyptian is not lauging at us discussing ful and koshari! 8)


message 13: by Niledaughter (new)

Niledaughter | 88 comments Marieke wrote: "Hi Nile daughter! I'm so happy to see you posting. :D

also I'm relieved that an Egyptian is not lauging at us discussing ful and koshari! 8)"


Thanks :)
no lauging , You are cooking not only eating , I am impressed :)


Petra is pretending crumbs are the whole loaf (petra-x) Nile daughter wrote: "hello all , I am new :)

wow Koshari & foul !
you entreated the heart of Egypt , very nice discussion :D

Petra X :
delicious recipe for Medames !"


Thank you. I lived in the Middle East for a few years and loved the food.


message 15: by Marieke, Former guide & Chief Chatterbox (new)

Marieke | 2838 comments Mod
i hope others join me in cooking! first i have to go back to djibouti and cook their national dish and let you guys know how it goes...anyone else interested in trying it? i'll also try to upload a picture or two to accompany my creation (disaster)...and then i'll try some egyptian dishes! i once tried to make ful and it was really a disaster. i don't quite know what i did wrong so i'm curious to try it in a slow cooker.

and koshari i've only ever read about/heard about, but never had so i won't really know if it's a disaster as long as what i make tastes good! haha!

nile daughter, if you have any other recommendations for relatively simple dishes to make, let us know!


message 16: by نشوى (new)

نشوى (engnashwa) | 10 comments I'm Egyptian too & I'm surprise when i read this topic
but i recommend molokhya & mahshi but they aren't simple dishes for cook I'll put the recipes


message 17: by Marieke, Former guide & Chief Chatterbox (new)

Marieke | 2838 comments Mod
Nashwa wrote: "I'm Egyptian too & I'm surprise when i read this topic
but i recommend molokhya & mahshi but they aren't simple dishes for cook I'll put the recipes"


Hi Nashwa! yes, please post recipes for these dishes. i am familiar with molokhya, but i don't think i know mahshi. it's okay if they are not simple--some of us are more experienced at cooking than others and would be interested in trying something that is a little complicated.

today i got my ingredients for the skoudekharis, which is the national dish of Djibouti--i will make it this week and post about it here at the Food in Djibouti thread and then i'll start trying these Egyptian dishes! I'll try to post pictures, too. :D

hopefully others will join in!


message 18: by Niledaughter (new)

Niledaughter | 88 comments Marieke :
djibouti dish ! wow ..how was it ?

For the foul , I will give you some tips :

- Soak the fava beans for 12 hours first then throw the water , cook in a fresh water, we do that for cooking Legumes .

- Add to (1/2) kg fava beans about a cup of yellow lintel & a spoon of rice if you like , and Add two whole lemons (not only juice), this will give the foul beautiful color & more tasty .

- I put nothing else in the easy cooker for (8 hours)
After cooked , I do the final steps for serving : salt , Cumin , dried coriander , fresh lemon juice , butter or oil .
Optional: Tahina (sesame paste) , fresh tomato , onion , garlic , Humous
Bon appétit ;)

Did you try falafel , bosara or lentil soup ?

I only cooked kushari with yellow lentil never the original one :p

In general you will find some intersections among Egyptian kitchen , Turkish & Greek ones :)

Nashwa :
Welcome onboard baladiat :D I was going to suggest mulokhia myself :)


message 19: by Marieke, Former guide & Chief Chatterbox (new)

Marieke | 2838 comments Mod
Nile daughter wrote: "Marieke :
djibouti dish ! wow ..how was it ?

For the foul , I will give you some tips :

- Soak the fava beans for 12 hours first then throw the water , cook in a fresh water, we do that for ..."


I didn't make the Djibouti dish yet; i think i will do it on Tuesday or Wednesday. I'm pretty excited about it since it has cardamom, cumin, and cloves...YUMMY (لذيذ جدا)

i have eaten amazing falafel at a shop/cafe run by a Lebanese-Egyptian family in my hometown but i have never made it myself. i don't think i know bosara...i LOVE lentil soup and i have several recipes from different countries but i would like to know what yours is, in case it's different. :D

post as many recipes as you'd like!


message 20: by Shaymaa (new)

Shaymaa | 1 comments Ok people since ur intrested in Egyptian food, try Mesaqah "مسقعة' and Feter "فطير" and u'll never regret trying them.

What is djibouti dish?


message 21: by Marieke, Former guide & Chief Chatterbox (new)

Marieke | 2838 comments Mod
Sbahnassy17 wrote: "Ok people since ur intrested in Egyptian food, try Mesaqah "مسقعة' and Feter "فطير" and u'll never regret trying them.

What is djibouti dish?"

i think starting next week i will only be cooking egyptian food! lol!

the djibouti dish is called "skoudekharis" and supposedly it is the national dish of djibouti, the last country that we visited on our tour. unfortunately we didn't seem to have anyone from djibouti in the group, so i didn't get any other recommendations beyond skoudekharis, which i found by doing a google search. it's a lamb or chicken stew with spices, rice, and tomatoes. i'm really excited to make it.


message 22: by [deleted user] (new)

You can buy zatar at Penzeys: Spices: http://www.penzeys.com/cgi-bin/penzey...

I've been happy with Penzeys' variety and flavor. They offer a number of spice mixes in addition to zatar. I myself am very fond of zatar on cottage cheese and cucumbers.


message 23: by نشوى (new)

نشوى (engnashwa) | 10 comments hey guys this is the video explan how to make "
"mahshi"
it's by arabic but i think you'll know the way to do it
because it's hard to me & to my English to explain it
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v2Yc85...
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Xh9cOH...


message 24: by Marieke, Former guide & Chief Chatterbox (new)

Marieke | 2838 comments Mod
Nashwa wrote: "hey guys this is the video explan how to make "
"mahshi"
it's by arabic but i think you'll know the way to do it
because it's hard to me & to my English to explain it
http://www.youtube.com/watch..."


thank you Nashwa! i will try to translate everything later...there are a few things i need to check in the dictionary...and then you guys (all the egyptians) can say if i got it right when you see the english!
XD


message 25: by Marieke, Former guide & Chief Chatterbox (new)

Marieke | 2838 comments Mod
oh..i just watched part 2; there are english subtitles...but i'll translate the ingredients from part 1. :D


message 26: by Niledaughter (new)

Niledaughter | 88 comments I found this for mahshi (stuffed grape leaves) on Egyptian way

http://arabicbites.blogspot.com/2009/...

Besara (I never cooked it ..just eat :p)
http://www.nirvanaskitchen.com/2009/0...

Falafel
http://www.nirvanaskitchen.com/2009/0...

Egyptian Lentil Soup (this is like mine but I smash the blend after it is well done cooked)

http://www.golden-recipes.com/free-co...

Molokheya
1-Molokheya with chicken
http://abissadacooks.blogspot.com/201...

2-Molokheya with rabbits(I perefer it this way , I cooked it today)
http://egyptian-cuisine-recipes.com/r...

3- Molokheya with Shrimps
I taste it , very nice :D but I do not know how to cook it & could not found the reciepe :(


Petra is pretending crumbs are the whole loaf (petra-x) I made shakshuka today. I used to eat it in the desert with Bedouin in what is now Egypt. Everyone in the Middle East seems to eat it though. Its ironic that no matter what hostilities there are, everyone enjoys the same food and has no problem pinching it from each other's cuisines.


message 28: by [deleted user] (new)

Yum, I love shakshuka.


Petra is pretending crumbs are the whole loaf (petra-x) I taught the Bedouin guy to make bread pudding in exchange :-)


message 30: by Niledaughter (last edited Sep 15, 2010 10:32PM) (new)

Niledaughter | 88 comments Petra X wrote: "..... I used to eat it in the desert with Bedouin in what is now Egypt.....

What does this mean ? I can not understand



message 31: by Marieke, Former guide & Chief Chatterbox (new)

Marieke | 2838 comments Mod
Petra X wrote: "I made shakshuka today."
i'm not familiar with this dish...can you tell us the recipe? or describe it a little and how it's made?


message 32: by Niledaughter (new)

Niledaughter | 88 comments Marieke:
Did you make the Djibouti dish or wil you go along with the egyptian kitchen ? :D


message 33: by Marieke, Former guide & Chief Chatterbox (new)

Marieke | 2838 comments Mod
Nile daughter wrote: "Marieke:
Did you make the Djibouti dish or wil you go along with the egyptian kitchen ? :D"


I was going to make it last night but I didn't have any onions! So I will get onions today and I'll make it tonight. This weekend I will get things to make some Egyptian food...I haven't decided yet which dish I will make first...


message 34: by Niledaughter (new)

Niledaughter | 88 comments Good luck ;)
Do you have Molokheya in the market ?


message 35: by Marieke, Former guide & Chief Chatterbox (new)

Marieke | 2838 comments Mod
Nile daughter wrote: "Good luck ;)
Do you have Molokheya in the market ?"

Thanks!!
I'm not sure about the molokheya--probably I can find it in a specialty store.


message 36: by Petra is pretending crumbs are the whole loaf (last edited Sep 16, 2010 09:57AM) (new)

Petra is pretending crumbs are the whole loaf (petra-x) Molokheya=jute. Used in India and the West for making sacks and things from. One variety (which produces better jute) is used for food in Egypt. If you like slimy sorts of food like okra then you might like it.

Shakshuka is the dinner-dish-of-last-resort, same as bread pudding is the dessert-of-last-resort. At the end of the week, when you haven't got any money and you are a student you look at what's left in the cupboard.

In a wide frying pan, you chop/slice fry up what you have of onions, peppers (lots of red ones is lovely) and garlic in a little olive oil. Season it with whatever you like with tomatoes, but not basil, turmeric is traditional, paprika, cayenne or anything else. Add a can or two of tomatoes or squishy peeled plum tomatoes and tomato paste if you have any and cook down until its not too liquidy but still a sauce, not a paste. Make holes in the sauce and break in eggs which you can either let poach or scramble (I like them like that). Take them out with a fish slice and sprinkle with the ubiquitous zaatar or paprika or parsely or nothing at all. I like them served with a big hunk of home-made day old bread to sop up the sauce as a big breakfast on a Sunday morning.


message 37: by Marieke, Former guide & Chief Chatterbox (new)

Marieke | 2838 comments Mod
That sounds delicious. It's like a backward omelet!

I do like okra. I've never seen molokhiya at a "regular" grocery store in the US, including Whole Foods, but I've also never looked for it. I live in an incredibly diverse area so I'm sure someone sells it! Iwill look into it. A new food adventure!


Petra is pretending crumbs are the whole loaf (petra-x) I don't think I described it very well then, its not a bit like an omelette. This is a pic I found, its of shakshuka made in an extremely small pan - I have a big one with room for lots of sauce.

http://www.goodreads.com/photo/user/1...


message 39: by Muphyn (new)

Muphyn | 816 comments Petra X wrote: "Molokheya=jute. Used in India and the West for making sacks and things from. One variety (which produces better jute) is used for food in Egypt. If you like slimy sorts of food like okra then you m..."

This sounds so yummy, Petra X!! (probably even more so because I haven't had breaky yet and it's already lunch time now.) That photo looks great, yum yum, I think I'll try that.


message 40: by Muphyn (new)

Muphyn | 816 comments Nile daughter wrote: "...Egyptian Lentil Soup (this is like mine but I smash the blend after it is well done cooked)

http://www.golden-recipes.com/free-cooki..."


Thanks heaps for posting this, Nile Daughter - I really want to try out the lentil soup, though I must say that the picture doesn't look that inviting... ;) But the recipe sounds yummy!


message 41: by Niledaughter (new)

Niledaughter | 88 comments You are welcome :)
It is yammy , I love making it in winter , Yes the image is not encouraging that is why I made the note of smashing , much ..much better;)


message 42: by Niledaughter (last edited Sep 20, 2010 03:09AM) (new)

Niledaughter | 88 comments Some Egyptian deserts :

1- Om Ali (Um Ali)
this popular desert has historical stories , just search for it ;)

http://www.familyoven.com/offsite?r_i...

2- Belila (more as breakfast or snack) & ASHOURA

Belila ( Wheat with milk):

INGREDIENTS:
2 cups wheat (or more if you want to),
2 1/2 cups water (for each cup of wheat add a cup of water, then add 1/2
a cup extra),
Sugar (to taste),
1 quart (1 l) Milk (to cover the wheat)

METHOD:
In a pot add the water & wheat. On medium high heat bring to a full
boil. Then reduce the heat to medium low. Leave it to simmer until the
wheat is soft (not too soft though).

Remove some of the water & add milk (so that the wheat is covered with
milk & maybe a little bit more). Add sugar.

On medium heat stir constantly until the sugar dilutes in the water.
When the sugar is all diluted, but it on low for 3 minutes.

NOTE:

* Could be served cold or hot. It is just a healthy, delicious meal.
* Don't throw away all the water from the boiling, cause that water
would contain many of the vitamins & minerals the wheat lost in the
process of boiling. You might even want to leave all the water & just
add the milk to it.
* Start off by adding little sugar. Then add more if it's not to your
taste.

Image
http://magdyzone.files.wordpress.com/...

* If you add cornstarch to it, you make up another Egyptian recipe
called Ashoura.

- ASHOURA:
After the Belila is all ready, & still hot.
In a cup mix 2-3 Tbs.. cornstarch with cold water (has to be cold, as
for the cornstarch not to make clots).

Add the cornstarch-water mixture to the Belila. Simmer on medium low
heat, until it starts to thicken (meanwhile, stir frequently).

Put in small serving bowls. Decorate with raisins (you could also add
raisins to the Belila before adding the cornstarch-water mixture),
shredded coconut &/or cinnamon powder.

NOTE:
* The Ashoura is cooked on a certain day of the Islamic calendar
(Moharram 10th).

Image
http://alfrasha.maktoob.com/up/177073...

This page is great
http://alt.nntp2http.com/food/recipes...


message 43: by Ingy (new)

Ingy (ngnoah) | 33 comments Oh my God you made me very hungry! I'll go prepare lunch then get back to this topic.. :D


message 44: by Marieke, Former guide & Chief Chatterbox (new)

Marieke | 2838 comments Mod
Lol ingy!
I didn't get to do my grocery shopping last weekend so I didn't make any Egyptian food this week. But hopefully next week I will! I wonder what I'll make...


message 45: by Andrea (new)

Andrea | 660 comments I just want to say thanks to all who are contributing here. I'm following along, but have been so busy with school I haven't been adventurous lately. At an African dinner once, a Morrocan friend brought almonds sort of sauted in butter and turmeric(?) and served it with a sort of bread. It was delicious. Does this sound familiar to anyone? It looked pretty easy to make.


Petra is pretending crumbs are the whole loaf (petra-x) I had a cup of sahlab tonight, and I've left some more to set for a pudding tomorrow but I don't know if I can wait that long.


message 47: by Marieke, Former guide & Chief Chatterbox (new)

Marieke | 2838 comments Mod
Petra X wrote: "I had a cup of sahlab tonight, and I've left some more to set for a pudding tomorrow but I don't know if I can wait that long."

ooo...what is sahlab? i meant to ask this when you posted. and can you show us a picture?

i made lentil soup (Nile Daughter's link) last week but i wasn't able to get the right type of lentils. still, it was DELICIOUS!!


message 48: by Niledaughter (last edited Oct 06, 2010 03:47PM) (new)

Niledaughter | 88 comments Glad you loved it :D what do you mean by the right type of lentils ?

I love to drink Sahlab in winter myself :p

http://egyptian-cuisine-recipes.com/r...

Pudding (I did not try it before)
http://www.food.com/recipe/sahlab-mid...

also (Fenugreek) is used to make popular drink in Egypt (specially for women)but I can not find any links now !


Petra is pretending crumbs are the whole loaf (petra-x) I don't fancy the Pudding recipe at all - its just a vanilla blancmange without the taste of the lovely flowery, spicy sahlab powder. I've always wanted to try dondurma - chewy sahlab icecream, but never even sen it, not even in Turkey. The Egyptian recipe sounds really good.

Fenugreek has such a strong curry flavour I can't imagine it as a drink other than in a soup.


Petra is pretending crumbs are the whole loaf (petra-x) Nile daughter wrote: "what do you mean about the right type of lentils?"

Red ones that fall apart instead of the brown or green ones.


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