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Classic Horror Writers > Modern horror writers that write 'old school'

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 Danielle The Book Huntress (Wants to Read More) (gatadelafuente) | 1343 comments Mod
Who are some modern authors that you think write in the old vein? Which stories/books would you recommend by them?


message 2: by Martha (new)

Martha (hellocthulhu) | 325 comments Mod
Well I think Shirley Jackson definitely does, but she could be considered old or modern depending on who you ask.
I have heard Thomas Ligotti does, I am itching to get my hands on some of his stuff soon!


 Danielle The Book Huntress (Wants to Read More) (gatadelafuente) | 1343 comments Mod
Shirley Jackson is definitely tipping towards classic horror, IMHO. I read one Thomas Ligotti story. It was very beautifully written. I have The Shadow at The Bottom of The World in my tbr pile.


message 4: by Tressa (new)

Tressa  (moanalisa) Scott Smith's The Ruins seems old style to me. Simon Clarke's Darkness Demands. Dan Simmons' dark fiction.


 Danielle The Book Huntress (Wants to Read More) (gatadelafuente) | 1343 comments Mod
I'm writing these down!


message 6: by Cathy (new)

Cathy | 164 comments Sarah Langan seems very old-school to me (I've only read one of hers, Audrey's Door, but it was great!). I agree with Ligotti, Dan Simmons, and Simon Clarke. Also, Ramsey Campbell really seems to be keeping that Lovecraftian tradition alive, especially in his short fiction and his earlier novels. Ancient Images is one of my all-time favorites of his.


message 7: by Mohammed (last edited Sep 02, 2010 12:22PM) (new)

Mohammed  (mohammedaosman) | 122 comments Hideyuki Kikuchi of Vampire Hunter D fame has a faint old school style. I got classic Gothic novels feel.

The writer info in the books say also that he wrote his other horror works that he is big in Japan for in the the tradition of Fritz Leiber,HP Lovecraft.

Other than that i havent read modern authors like, i even tried to get library books by Ligotti,Cisco but in the whole library system i didnt find any books of them. Another reason i read more classic horror easier to find historically important horror writers.


message 8: by Jason (last edited Sep 02, 2010 01:57PM) (new)

Jason (darkfiction) | 164 comments I definitely agree about Ramsey Campbell. But there are a lot of short stories out there that, I find, try to capture the old feeling in classic literature. Authors like Stephen King and Ramsey Campbell have done this, and very well. There are others, of course, but their names escape me right now.

Caitlin R. Kiernan is heavily influenced by Lord Dunsany and Arthur Machen. I think this is reflected in her short fiction a lot, as well.


message 9: by Phil (new)

Phil (philhappy) | 19 comments I'm gonna give a shout out to Banquet for the Damned by Adam L.G. Nevill. The book was written as an homage to the classics and it works really, really well. My only complaint is that in the homage 'thing' he named a lot of the characters after classic horror writers (the main character is called Dante) which I didn't really like. Other than that though it's a great book.

There's whole chapters of the book that you could rip out and read as a short story. And it all gells together as a great, atmospheric story.

Well worth a read as a modern take on the classic horror/gothic tale.


message 10: by Cathy (new)

Cathy | 164 comments Oooh! And I'd never heard of it!

Tananarive Due's Good House is a nice traditional "evil powers awakened" story.


message 11: by Mohammed (new)

Mohammed  (mohammedaosman) | 122 comments Hehe good recommendation thread for modern horror writers this thread became for me :)

Modern take on the classic tale is very interesting to me.


message 12: by Charles (new)

Charles (tonalized) | 8 comments Martha wrote: "I have heard Thomas Ligotti does, I am itching to get my hands on some of his stuf..."

I just picked up Thomas Ligotti a year or two ago, but he has since become my favorite modern author. My personal favorite is Teatro Grottesco which is still in print (unlike a lot of his earlier stuff). I highly recommend giving him a go.


message 13: by Simon (last edited Sep 03, 2010 07:11AM) (new)

Simon (friedegg) | 133 comments I will add my voice in support for Thomas Ligotti. He is an outstanding modern horror author who definitely writes in the classic tradition whilst feeling new and distinctive at the same time. No mean feat. Possibly my favourite author, not only of horror, but of any genre...


Mike (the Paladin) (thepaladin) | 212 comments Haven't run on any I'd name...but I'm running down some of the writers already noted here, thanks. (as if I need more "to be read" books). :)


message 15: by Mohammed (last edited Sep 04, 2010 09:19AM) (new)

Mohammed  (mohammedaosman) | 122 comments Simon wrote: "I will add my voice in support for Thomas Ligotti. He is an outstanding modern horror author who definitely writes in the classic tradition whilst feeling new and distinctive at the same time. No m..."

Thats why i wanted to read him he gets alot of acclaim in comparison to many modern horror writers. There was a copy of Teatro Grottesco in the library system but someone never returned it.

Teatro Grottesco cost 15 dollars as Hardcover which is not too expensive for me to try that work of his. I really want good modern horror,subtle,literary horror.


message 16: by Larry (new)

Larry (hal9000i) | 93 comments Lady Danielle "The Book Huntress" wrote: "Who are some modern authors that you think write in the old vein? Which stories/books would you recommend by them?"

Hmm, I asked this very question on Library thing a while ago! I believe I got recommended Thomas Ligotti. Yet to try him yet-where to start?


message 17: by Simon (new)

Simon (friedegg) | 133 comments Larry wrote: "I believe I got recommended Thomas Ligotti. Yet to try him yet-where to start? "

I'm not sure he would be your thing Larry, although he is definitely worth trying. I don't know whether he might be a little too...eliptic for your tastes?


message 18: by Larry (new)

Larry (hal9000i) | 93 comments eliptic??


message 19: by Kurt (new)

Kurt Reichenbaugh (kurtreichenbaugh) | 54 comments Phil, Banquet for the Damned sounds like a good one. You've sold me - I'm going to check that one out.


Mike (the Paladin) (thepaladin) | 212 comments Sounds interesting...but I have to by it if I want to read it soon. May have to wait a bit.


 Danielle The Book Huntress (Wants to Read More) (gatadelafuente) | 1343 comments Mod
Manchester House had a delightfully old school vibe, although also some J-horror touches. I was very impressed with this book.

On the Verge of Madness had a great Weird Tales vibe, with some Lovecraftian, Twilight Zone elements.


message 22: by Martha (new)

Martha (hellocthulhu) | 325 comments Mod
I looked up Manchester House on Amazon and they only had the e-book. :(


 Danielle The Book Huntress (Wants to Read More) (gatadelafuente) | 1343 comments Mod
I didn't realize it was only in ebook. If you decide you want to read it, you can download the Kindle for PC software and read it on your computer.


message 24: by Simon (new)

Simon (friedegg) | 133 comments Larry wrote: "eliptic??"

Pardon my spelling!

I would recommend starting with My Work Is Not Yet Done: Three Tales of Corporate Horror. That one's still in print anyway...


message 25: by Robert (new)

Robert Dunbar | 18 comments Sarah Waters needs to be on this list. (THE LITTLE STRANGER was very Haunting of Hill House-esque.)


message 26: by Cathy (new)

Cathy | 164 comments I forgot to mention T.E.D. Klein. Terrific stories, and very old school.


message 27: by Michael (new)

Michael (mikedecshop) | 30 comments Just finished The Little Stranger it is very much in the classic mode. She even puts asterisks between the F and the K.


message 28: by Amanda (new)

Amanda Lyons (amandamlyons) Matt wrote: "Cathy wrote: "I forgot to mention T.E.D. Klein. Terrific stories, and very old school."

Whoops, I forgot Klein. He's on my major list of writers, too. Good call!"


Wish there was more of him! :(


message 29: by Steve (new)

Steve | 31 comments I'm reading "old school" as well-crafted. I agree with many of the above names. One I would add would beLaird Barron.


message 30: by Larry (new)

Larry (hal9000i) | 93 comments Anyone heard of a belgian writer named Jean Ray?( His real name is quite long!) Very hard to find apparently!


 Danielle The Book Huntress (Wants to Read More) (gatadelafuente) | 1343 comments Mod
I haven't heard of him, Larry. Can you recommend some of his stories?


message 32: by Cathy (new)

Cathy | 164 comments Is he the guy who wrote Malpertuis? I've wanted to read that book for ages, it's really tough to find.


Mike (the Paladin) (thepaladin) | 212 comments Did we mention Ray Bradbury? He's a sort of mixed bag genre wise, but I remembered "Something Wicked This Way Comes".


message 34: by Larry (new)

Larry (hal9000i) | 93 comments Mike, isn't that fantasy rather than horror?


message 35: by Simon (new)

Simon (friedegg) | 133 comments Larry wrote: "Mike, isn't that fantasy rather than horror?"

Dark fantasy bordering on horror in my opinion.


message 36: by Mohammed (new)

Mohammed  (mohammedaosman) | 122 comments Ray Bradbury is mentioned in horror great lists. The collection i read had Dark Fantasy stories,some that was clearly supernatural horror. Weird tales kind of horror.

Dark Fantasy is often other words for weird,horror anyway.


message 37: by Simon (new)

Simon (friedegg) | 133 comments It's definitely a grey area, that's for sure.


message 38: by Mohammed (new)

Mohammed  (mohammedaosman) | 122 comments Simon wrote: "It's definitely a grey area, that's for sure."

Yeah and really who cares i like reading dark fantasy that isnt quite horror. You want the supernatural,the weird stuff if its horror or not.


 Danielle The Book Huntress (Wants to Read More) (gatadelafuente) | 1343 comments Mod
I like that gray area between dark fantasy and horror, because it doesn't have to follow any pre-set genre rules. Like Mohammed, I like the weird stuff.


message 40: by Larry (new)

Larry (hal9000i) | 93 comments Yea, weird is best!


message 41: by Cathy (new)

Cathy | 164 comments I can't believe I didn't think of Susan Hill -- The Woman in Black is a classic (and terrifying) ghost story, and The Man in the Picture is a flat-out homage to M.R. James.

For weird stories, you can't do better than Robert Aickman. It kills me that all his stuff is out of print.


Mike (the Paladin) (thepaladin) | 212 comments I like James. I'm reading a collection I've been meaning to get to for some time and the low key horror he can deliver (as well as overt at times if he wants) is good. Just read The Mezzotint which I assume is the story you are referring to. I haven't read The Man in the Picture, I'll have to run it down.


message 43: by Danielle The Book Huntress (Wants to Read More), Jamesian Enthusiast (last edited Sep 15, 2010 09:10AM) (new)

 Danielle The Book Huntress (Wants to Read More) (gatadelafuente) | 1343 comments Mod
I was lucky enough to find Painted Devils: Strange Stories by Robert Aickman at the used bookstore. He truly does write weird stories.

MR James tells the best ghost stories.


message 44: by Mohammed (new)

Mohammed  (mohammedaosman) | 122 comments That makes Aickman very hot in my eyes, have to look out for his books second hand,library.


message 45: by Simon (new)

Simon (friedegg) | 133 comments Mohammed wrote: "That makes Aickman very hot in my eyes, have to look out for his books second hand,library."

Good Luck! I've been on the look out for some of his work for a while now and I haven't seen his books anywhere...


message 46: by Mohammed (new)

Mohammed  (mohammedaosman) | 122 comments Simon wrote: "Mohammed wrote: "That makes Aickman very hot in my eyes, have to look out for his books second hand,library."

Good Luck! I've been on the look out for some of his work for a while now and I haven'..."


Ah that doesnt sound good, you cant find him in UK means im almost screwed ;)


message 47: by Simon (last edited Sep 16, 2010 08:33AM) (new)

Simon (friedegg) | 133 comments Well, I've hardly scoured the country from coast to coast yet but he does seem fairly rare. I'm gradually reconciling myself to the fact I will have to buy some expensive import on Amazon...


message 48: by Mohammed (new)

Mohammed  (mohammedaosman) | 122 comments No no abebooks is better those have rarest books ever plus the shipping is so cheap because its mostly UK books.

If i can get rare books for 4-10 punds for shipping+book you shouldnt have trouble.


message 49: by D. (new)

D. Ward (daward) I found John Langan's "Mr. Gaunt & Other Uneasy Encounters" to be of this style, which I greatly appreciate.


message 50: by D. (new)

D. Ward (daward) There are a couple of Lovecraftian anthologies - out of the many, many, many - where the authors tend to approach the stories with a classic theme. These are "Children of Cthulhu" and "Shadows Over Baker Street." China Mieville, Brian Hodge, and Tim Lebbon come to mind from these. IMHO, these are the best Lovecraft inspired anthologies I have come across.


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