Folklore & Fairytales discussion

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Have Fairy Tales and Folklore Become Less Popular?

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message 1: by Ronyell (new)

Ronyell (rabbitearsblog) | 95 comments I wanted to ask everyone if fairy tales and folklore have become less popular over the current years. I have noticed that fairy tales and folklore were big subjects of many films and books during the 80s and the 90s and even way before the 80s and the 90s. But during the recent years, there has rarely been any movies made about fairy tales or folklore. I have noticed some fairy tale movies that have came out such as The Princess and the Frog and Enchanted and Ella Enchanted that were fairy tale influenced, and I wanted to see everyone's opinions about how fairy tales and folklore are treated in today's society.


message 2: by Christine (new)

Christine (chrisarrow) There is a new version of Rapunzel coming out. The Sisters Grimm seems to be a popular series. I think adaptions are more popular than say the original Andersen or Grimm.


message 3: by Ronyell (new)

Ronyell (rabbitearsblog) | 95 comments Chandra - I agree that many people do not recognize whenever a certain modern story like Ella Enchanted (Cinderella) and The Princess and the Frog (The Frog Prince) are influenced by a fairy tale.

Chris - I agree that many people are making remakes or adaptations of famous fairy tales rather than bringing back the original stories. I guess I was wondering about what happened to the original fairy tales, even though they do exist in society, but in a different form.


message 4: by Manybooks (new)

Manybooks | 65 comments As Chandra has pointed out, fairy and folktales are always changing (they have been changing forever, since the dawn of humanity, so that is nothing new, and it is, in fact, exciting and fun). Originally, fairy and folktales were orally transmitted and changed with subsequent retellings. Now, many of these tales have been "captured" (so to say) on paper, but now they change through adapting them to other media, such as television, film etc. However, the original oral tradition of fairy and folktales has been sort of receiving a bit of a renaissance as well. In Germany, for example, there are actual fairy tale and folktale tellers (raconteurs) who go to schools, daycares, libraries, telling well-known fairy and fokltales. And, most of them, change the scope, the characters etc. of the tale to suit their respective audiences. I had the pleasure of listening to one of these when I took a course on fairy tales in Germany years ago (a summer program done by the city of Marburg); it was an amazing experience.


message 5: by Manybooks (last edited Sep 02, 2010 07:45AM) (new)

Manybooks | 65 comments Chandra wrote: "That sounds VERY cool Gundula! I love the idea of maintaining an oral tradition. Just on a small scale I love it when my daughter tells me a story or little anecdote that she's heard. There's so..."

Kids telling stories is one way to promote the oral tradition, and who knows, the story telling kids of today may become the raconteurs of the future. Also, even books can help maintain the oral tradition. A person might read a book and then retell the story, thus a written source of an anecdote, a fairy or folktale can engender oral retellings.


message 6: by Ronyell (new)

Ronyell (rabbitearsblog) | 95 comments I love it when storytellers come to schools and tell a story they remembered. I remember when I was in elementary school, a woman came to our school and she used to orally tell us stories about Anansi the spider and many other fairy tales and folktales and I remembered when many kids in my class just loved it when she came around. She used to tell the best stories and I was always happy when she came around the school telling up various folktales and fairy tales she remembered as a child. I think oral retellings is another way of promoting the existence of fairy tales towards children of future generations, especially if you don't have television and I think back then, television didn't exist, so they would have parents or other people telling their children stories that they remembered as children.

I noticed that everytime a fairy tale or a folktale is broadcast on TV, then they usually have to change it or watered it down to suit the current audience, especially the tales with the Brothers Grimm. I guess I was a little concerned about how the original fairy tales and folktales are rarely shown on TV nowandays even though they have many retellings of these fairy tales and folktales nowandays.


message 7: by Kathryn (last edited Sep 02, 2010 02:53PM) (new)

Kathryn | 5 comments Oooh, I love storytelling!

As for fairytales, I think what is happening currently is that they are "being made fun of" (for lack of a better word) or changed around in order to remain popular. And, yet, even in that I think it speaks to the enduring nature of fairytales and folktales and that there is something in them that society *needs* I mean, even in "Shrek" (that totally poked fun at a lot of fairytales, etc.) we still have a basic fairytale plot and "happy ever after" ending. And it looks like the new Disney "Tangled" is a kind of "hip" version of Rapunzel, but they're still doing fairytales and a real prince/princess looking one, castles and pretty dresses and all ;-)

I think, too, sometimes the tales have to be "spiced up" for the adult audience with sex, violence, cussing (then again, original version of many fairytales were pretty darn crazy, haha!) which I am not always a fan of but, again, it shows that the tales are still being adapted to our current culture, rather than being dismissed. --I'm thinking here of such things as Stardust (awesome movie, BTW) which is an original fairytale for adults by Neil Gaiman.

For kids... well, I really think a lot of kids are like the little boy in "Princess Bride"--maybe they think they are supposed to roll their eyes at the fairytale stuff, but deep down they have a hunger for it, they love it, and it's "cool stuff" after all! ;-) It's just a matter of getting them away from all the other "stuff" in life to really listen.


message 8: by Ronyell (new)

Ronyell (rabbitearsblog) | 95 comments Kathryn wrote: "Oooh, I love storytelling!

As for fairytales, I think what is happening currently is that they are "being made fun of" (for lack of a better word) or changed around in order to remain popular. An..."


That's a great theory Kathryn!! I agree that fairy tales nowandays are sort of being made fun of, but it helped keep the fairy tales up in today's world, especially with the success of "Shrek."


message 9: by Manybooks (last edited Sep 02, 2010 05:11PM) (new)

Manybooks | 65 comments Apropos, fractured or humorous fairy tales, there are even examples of this in the collections of the Brothers Grimm. One of my favourites is a Rumpelstiltskin-type story, but only to an extent, called "The Three Spinners" A young girl who does not like to spin thread, becomes victim of her mother's lie to the queen that she does not have enough hemp for the girl to spin into thread. The girl is taken to the castle and she is helped by three very ugly fairies who only ask that they be invited to her wedding if the queen's son should ask her to be his wife. At the wedding, the bride introduces the three ugly fairies as family members. When the bridegroom asks about their physical deformities (very uncouth, but, hey), the three tell him that this has happened because of all of the hemp and flax they have had to spin into yarn, thus the prince decrees that his wife shall never ever have to spin again. I always laugh at this story, it is basically a Rumpelstiltskin story turned upside down, and I have read other examples of this type of tale as well, where the girl gets out of further spinning duties by making herself ugly and claiming that spinning thread will make one ugly.


message 10: by Christine (new)

Christine (chrisarrow) Gundula wrote: "Apropos, fractured or humorous fairy tales, there are even examples of this in the collections of the Brothers Grimm. One of my favourites is a Rumpelstiltskin-type story, but only to an extent, c..."

I love the Three Spinners! I know that it also applied in the Italian collection by Italo Calvino. I wonder if the Italy is the source.


message 11: by Ronyell (new)

Ronyell (rabbitearsblog) | 95 comments Gundula wrote: "Apropos, fractured or humorous fairy tales, there are even examples of this in the collections of the Brothers Grimm. One of my favourites is a Rumpelstiltskin-type story, but only to an extent, c..."

Oh yeah! I remembered "The Three Spinners!" It did felt like a hilarious retelling of "Rumpelstiltskin!" Some other stories from the Brothers Grimm that I like to talk about are "How Six Made Their Way into the World" and "The Six Servants." These two stories are so similar to each other because they both featured a main character who is accompanied by a group of people who have superhuman abilities and they used their superhuman abilities to foil the plans of the king or queen involved in the story. I have always loved these types of stories because it was interesting to see how the people with their superhuman abilities can use their abilities to benefit the lead character. This type of fairy tale has also been very popular in many folktales such as "The Fool of the World and the Flying Ship."

This might not be related to fairy tales or folktales, but it is an example of how fairy tales and folktales have influenced today's society. Noticed that in Stan Lee's X-Men, Ultimate Avengers, and the Fantastic Four comics that they also featured people with superhuman abilities who use them for good? I think stories like "The Six Servants" and "The Fool of the World and the Flying Ship" might have influenced these comics because of the theme of using people with superhuman abilities to complete any task they have to do in the world.


message 12: by Kathryn (new)

Kathryn | 5 comments That's a great point about the superhero comics, etc. Ronyell! :-) And, "The Three Spinners" sounds like a great tale!


message 13: by Manybooks (new)

Manybooks | 65 comments Kathryn wrote: "That's a great point about the superhero comics, etc. Ronyell! :-) And, "The Three Spinners" sounds like a great tale!"

You should read "The Three Spinners." It's really amusing, but because it is not one of the more popular of Grimms' fairy tales, it is often ignored. I certainly did not know about it as a child, I first read it as an adult (and, I think I appreciated the humor more as an adult as well).


message 14: by Manybooks (new)

Manybooks | 65 comments Chris wrote: "Gundula wrote: "Apropos, fractured or humorous fairy tales, there are even examples of this in the collections of the Brothers Grimm. One of my favourites is a Rumpelstiltskin-type story, but only..."

I believe there are many different sources for Grimms' tales. Many of them, in fact, are of French origin, because some of the Grimms' main sources for their folktales were families of Huegenot French refugees living in Germany.


message 15: by Ronyell (new)

Ronyell (rabbitearsblog) | 95 comments Gundula wrote: "Chris wrote: "Gundula wrote: "Apropos, fractured or humorous fairy tales, there are even examples of this in the collections of the Brothers Grimm. One of my favourites is a Rumpelstiltskin-type s..."

Oh, I didn't know that the Brothers Grimm got their sources for their fairy tales from French families living in Germany. Thanks for that information Gundula!! :)


message 16: by Ronyell (new)

Ronyell (rabbitearsblog) | 95 comments Kathryn wrote: "That's a great point about the superhero comics, etc. Ronyell! :-) And, "The Three Spinners" sounds like a great tale!"

Thanks Kathryn!!!


message 17: by Michael (new)

Michael | 24 comments Ronyell wrote: "Noticed that in Stan Lee's X-Men, Ultimate Avengers, and the Fantastic Four comics that they also featured people with superhuman abilities who use them for good? I think stories like "The Six Servants" and "The Fool of the World and the Flying Ship" might have influenced these comics because of the theme of using people with superhuman abilities to complete any task they have to do in the world.
..."


I don't think that folklore was a primary source for the creators of the superhero genre (but see below). Superhero comics trace their lineage back through Superman to the pulp-novel hero, Doc Savage (Clark Kent got his first name in homage to Dr Clark Savage Jr.) whose literary roots lie with adventure heroes like Allan Quatermain. After that, superheroes were largely involved in fighting organised crime, nazis, communists and spies.

Stan Lee's first Marvel Comics heroes were the Fantatsic Four and they gained their powers while trying to beat communist Russia to the moon. There is a folkloric link of sorts, in that the poweres of each of the Four derive from the Classical Greek elements of earth, water, air and fire.

With Stan Lee characters like The Mighty Thor, there is an obvious mythic/folkloric origin, even if most of the stories involve battling supervillains.

I think that the themes of folklore are so universal and ingrained into the human psyche that they will appear almost anywhere stories are told. Comics have such a relentless publishing schedule that it is little wonder that these ready-made themes are drawn upon - pun not intended, but it's quite good anyway ;-) - by comics writers as a shortcut or launchpad for their stories


message 18: by Manybooks (new)

Manybooks | 65 comments Ronyell wrote: "Gundula wrote: "Chris wrote: "Gundula wrote: "Apropos, fractured or humorous fairy tales, there are even examples of this in the collections of the Brothers Grimm. One of my favourites is a Rumpel..."

Not all of their tales, but quite a few of the tales, they were, at least, not mostly gathered from German peasants.


message 19: by Manybooks (new)

Manybooks | 65 comments I think the main thing to realise is that folklore has not become less popular, but it is a vital and always evolving entity which changes with the times and the tastes of the reading and listening public. Also, just look at the popularity of fantasy series, like the Harry Potter series, it draws very, very heavily on the folkloric traditions of Europe, of the world, in fact.


message 20: by Ronyell (new)

Ronyell (rabbitearsblog) | 95 comments Michael wrote: "Ronyell wrote: "Noticed that in Stan Lee's X-Men, Ultimate Avengers, and the Fantastic Four comics that they also featured people with superhuman abilities who use them for good? I think stories li..."

Oh yes, I agree with you about how the superhero comics were not technically based off by fairy tales, but rather by the events that were going on at that time. I wanted to compare X-Men and those to folklore like "The Fool and the Flying Ship" and "The Six Servants" to see how they are similar and how the theme of using a superhuman team to do anything has appeared in both versions of the stories.


message 21: by Ronyell (new)

Ronyell (rabbitearsblog) | 95 comments Gundula wrote: "I think the main thing to realise is that folklore has not become less popular, but it is a vital and always evolving entity which changes with the times and the tastes of the reading and listening..."

I agree Gundula that Harry Potter has indeed made the fantasy book world more popular than it was years ago and Harry Potter does contains so much folkloric elements such as witchcraft, so the fairy tale and folkloric universe does continued to live on, but just simply in a different form. This is a really great discussion so far and I was wondering if any of these folktales and fairy tales should be transform into a TV series! Hmmm...maybe I should make that into another topic! :)


message 22: by Duntay (new)

Duntay | 6 comments Doesn't all this vampire stuff that is so trendy lately have it's roots in folklore?


message 23: by Ronyell (new)

Ronyell (rabbitearsblog) | 95 comments Duntay wrote: "Doesn't all this vampire stuff that is so trendy lately have it's roots in folklore?"

I think so, because most of the vampire books that are popular nowandays contain witchcraft and other magical elements that existed in fairy tales and folklore many years ago.


message 24: by Christine (new)

Christine (chrisarrow) The Discworld series too has a great many roots in folklore. Pratchett has even co-authored The Folklore of Discworld which shows the connections.


message 25: by Michael (new)

Michael | 24 comments Ronyell wrote: "I was wondering if any of these folktales and fairy tales should be transform into a TV series!"

There was a brilliant TV series in the 80s based on European folktales: The Storyteller. Very well realised, great actors and a perfect blend of humour and the grotesque. All you need to know is here:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Stor...

If you haven't seen this series I would highly recommend it.


message 26: by Ronyell (new)

Ronyell (rabbitearsblog) | 95 comments Michael wrote: "Ronyell wrote: "I was wondering if any of these folktales and fairy tales should be transform into a TV series!"

There was a brilliant TV series in the 80s based on European folktales: The Story..."


That sounds like a great series Michael! I'll have to check it out since I love fairy tales!!! :)


message 27: by Ronyell (new)

Ronyell (rabbitearsblog) | 95 comments Chandra wrote: "I recently watched The Storyteller - Greek Myths. I thought they were fantastic! I definitely want to watch the rest.

I've also enjoyed Faerie Tale Theatre. I loved it when I was a kid and go..."


That sounds great Chandra!!! I think I heard about Fairy Tale Theatre when I was small, but I barely remembered the series.


message 28: by Ronyell (new)

Ronyell (rabbitearsblog) | 95 comments There's also two great series that featured fairy tales and folklore that I like to point out. One of them was a British animation company called Cosgrove Hall and they would make great animated episodes of various fairy tales and folklore including Roald Dahl's The BFG, The Fool of the World and the Flying Ship and Wind in the Willows.

The other series was called Rabbit Ears Productions (now called Rabbit Ears Entertainment) and they would feature celebrities narrating popular fairy tales and folklore. Check out the Rabbit Ears Productions Group for more information!


message 29: by Kathryn (new)

Kathryn | 5 comments I, too, am really enjoying this discussion. Thanks for getting it started, Ronyell!


message 30: by Ronyell (new)

Ronyell (rabbitearsblog) | 95 comments You're welcome Kathryn!!


message 31: by Ronyell (new)

Ronyell (rabbitearsblog) | 95 comments I guess I was wondering if folklore is becoming less popular, since fairy tales might become popular again due to the success of the new movie "Tangled." What do you all think about folklore having an impact on today's society? And when I mentioned folklore, I meant stories like:

The Fool of the World and the Flying Ship: Russia
The Boy Who Drew Cats: Japan
Peachboy: Japan
John Henry: United States
Paul Bunyan: United States
The Firebird: Russia
Finn McCoul: Ireland
The Tiger and the Brahmin: India
and many more.


message 32: by Andy (new)

Andy (theon3leftbehind) | 1 comments Well.. I can say right now that since I'm a Traditional Witch (that being non-Wiccan, pre-Christian and practicing hedge-riding) I have WAY more interest in folklore than anyone I know. I like doing research that connect to my beliefs, such as folklore about the Anglo-Saxon shamanistic ideas of the way of Wyrd, which is connected to what I practice. I feel like in my case, my interest in witchcraft is what brought me to folklore and fairytales--I want to find origins; I have an everlasting desire to find out what has happened in the past.


message 33: by Bronwyn (new)

Bronwyn (nzfriend) | 12 comments I think possibly they're less popular for people to read (generally fairy tales are kids stories it seems), but at the same time there have been and continue to be a lot of films of revamped fairy tales lately. There was the new red riding hood and beastly and the Shrek movies have a lot fairy tale elements. So I don't think they're necessarily less popular, just that they're being consumed in a new form.


message 34: by Bronwyn (new)

Bronwyn (nzfriend) | 12 comments Heh, it helps if I read through a thread first... Oh well. :)


message 35: by [deleted user] (new)

Ronyell wrote: "I wanted to ask everyone if fairy tales and folklore have become less popular over the current years. I have noticed that fairy tales and folklore were big subjects of many films and books during t..."

Let me throw out another question. Do you think young people today are less familar with the older fairy tales and folklore? Many of the students whom I teach have no idea what I am talking about when I refer to characters in fairy tales and folklore. Unless of course we are talking about Shrek or other popular current movie characters.


message 36: by Ronyell (new)

Ronyell (rabbitearsblog) | 95 comments NebraskaIcebergs wrote: "Ronyell wrote: "I wanted to ask everyone if fairy tales and folklore have become less popular over the current years. I have noticed that fairy tales and folklore were big subjects of many films an..."

That is a good question Nebraska. I have noticed that in many schools, they do not teach fairy tales as often as they used to back then. I wonder if that is the reason why the original fairy tales and folktales are rarely shown these days.


message 37: by Manybooks (last edited May 29, 2011 03:15PM) (new)

Manybooks | 65 comments NebraskaIcebergs wrote: "Ronyell wrote: "I wanted to ask everyone if fairy tales and folklore have become less popular over the current years. I have noticed that fairy tales and folklore were big subjects of many films an..."

It's not just that as Ronyell mentioned they do not teach traditional fairy tales as much in school anymore, the main problem is more likely that many of today's kids are not having traditional fairy tales read to them by parents, grandparents etc. I was aware of many of the Grimm's fairy tales before I ever started school, having had the tales read to me and/or told to me at home. I am not saying that modern parents "do not" read traditional fairy tales to their children anymore, but I think it is not as common as practice as it used to be (and of course, there has been some talk about traditional fairy tales being politically incorrect, so some parents are likely deliberately refusing to read these tales to their children, or afraid of reading them to their kids).


message 38: by Ronyell (new)

Ronyell (rabbitearsblog) | 95 comments Gundula wrote: "NebraskaIcebergs wrote: "Ronyell wrote: "I wanted to ask everyone if fairy tales and folklore have become less popular over the current years. I have noticed that fairy tales and folklore were big ..."

That is a good point Gundula, especially about how some parents might not want to read fairy tales to their children because of the magic themes in the stories. We were discussing about books being banned over at the Banned Books Club and what shocked me on the list we saw was that "Sleeping Beauty" was banned from a school because it was "anti-feminist" and contained "magical themes" (from what I remembered) and it worries me that if one fairy tale was banned from a school, who knows what would happened if fairy tales overall are banned. That would be a disaster.


message 39: by Manybooks (new)

Manybooks | 65 comments Ronyell wrote: "Gundula wrote: "NebraskaIcebergs wrote: "Ronyell wrote: "I wanted to ask everyone if fairy tales and folklore have become less popular over the current years. I have noticed that fairy tales and fo..."

What also bothers me with that scenario (besides the fact that books are getting banned) is the fact that in the majority of these cases, it is only a minority, sometimes even just one vocal parent etc. who makes a fuss and gets book(s) banned. In many cases, books do not get banned, but unfortunately, schoolboards sometimes would rather appease a dissenting parent than stand up and say "no" (especially if the parent has some religious group or a politician behind him/her).


message 40: by Ronyell (new)

Ronyell (rabbitearsblog) | 95 comments Gundula wrote: "Ronyell wrote: "Gundula wrote: "NebraskaIcebergs wrote: "Ronyell wrote: "I wanted to ask everyone if fairy tales and folklore have become less popular over the current years. I have noticed that fa..."

This is one of the many reasons why I dislike banning books so much because in banning these books, people might never get the chance to read the book that was so popular, but was banned afterwards. Probably another reason why parents don't read fairy tales to their kids is because the book is banned for some unknown reason and it's not really fair to kids because they never had the chance to know about all the popular fairy tale characters that older generations have grew up on.


message 41: by Parvathy (new)

Parvathy | 15 comments When I was small my mother used to read me stories about Cinderalla, Red Riding Hood, Three bears etc and that was how I started liking fairy tales. Then watched the Disney cartoons at that time Snow white, cinderalla, little mermaid etc. Little Mermaid was my favorite (the Disney version) then I read the original version and refused to believe that story. Recently I spent some time with my five year old cousin and I realized she didn't have the least idea about stories like Cinderalla and Snow White which I grew up with. So I sat her down and told her all the stories I knew and before I knew it she was pestering me for more. Orally told fairy tales does have its appeal but parents now a days usually don't find time for such a tradition and children don't usually sit down and take up a book for reading. So the next medium is usually the television. Television shows promoting fairytales can increase its popularity to a certain extent. I have noticed that certain Barbie movies even though they do not follow the original story line does have its appeal for children and can help in kindling their interest. I for one have decided to maintain the oral tradition of fairy tales by telling them to children like my cousin.


 Danielle The Book Huntress (Winter Frost Queen)  (gatadelafuente) | 10 comments It's hard to say. I think less people actively seek them out, but they are such an intrinsic part of popular culture, that many people appreciate fairy tales without even recognizing the source material from the ideas that are seen on television and in movies, and read in books. Many stories are simply fairy tale retellings that are modernized.


message 43: by Ronyell (new)

Ronyell (rabbitearsblog) | 95 comments Lady Danielle "The Book Huntress" wrote: "It's hard to say. I think less people actively seek them out, but they are such an intrinsic part of popular culture, that many people appreciate fairy tales without even recognizing the source mat..."

That's a good point Danielle! It's true that many people nowadays don't know where the fairy tales actually originated from like for example, if people nowadays have seen the movie "Tangled," some people would not know that this was a retelling of "Rapunzel" unless they have read the original story from where it was based off of.


 Danielle The Book Huntress (Winter Frost Queen)  (gatadelafuente) | 10 comments I hope that people get inspired to read the original fairy tales from seeing these modern retellings.


message 45: by Jennifer (new)

Jennifer Thorne (jennifer_thorne) | 9 comments Ronyell wrote: "Lady Danielle "The Book Huntress" wrote: "It's hard to say. I think less people actively seek them out, but they are such an intrinsic part of popular culture, that many people appreciate fairy tal..."

The recent success of 'The Sisters Grimm' is heartening, but there is a serious lack in fairytale picture books for kids these days. Maybe it's just that the picture book market is dying a slow and and painful death, and the old tales are just the first victims.

Not knowing the source of the tales is... disheartening to me.


 Danielle The Book Huntress (Winter Frost Queen)  (gatadelafuente) | 10 comments I agree, Jennifer. If I had children, I would probably read fairy tales to them from a very young age. It would be great to pass that on, since my mother did that for me, and they truly have helped to shape who I am as a person.


message 47: by Jennifer (last edited Nov 08, 2011 10:26AM) (new)

Jennifer Thorne (jennifer_thorne) | 9 comments Lady Danielle "The Book Huntress" wrote: "I agree, Jennifer. If I had children, I would probably read fairy tales to them from a very young age. It would be great to pass that on, since my mother did that for me, and they truly have helped..."

I found a lovely illustrated easy read fairytale book by Usborne. My daughter has re-read it quite a few times.

But I have to say that my all-time favourite book on that subject is 'Favorite Folktales from around the World', edited by Jane Yolen. Not as kid-friendly sometimes, but you can find good ones for smaller people, too.


 Danielle The Book Huntress (Winter Frost Queen)  (gatadelafuente) | 10 comments I'll have to find the Yolen edition, since I collect fairy tale volumes (not the picture books though). Thanks, Jennifer.


message 49: by Jennifer (new)

Jennifer Thorne (jennifer_thorne) | 9 comments Lady Danielle "The Book Huntress" wrote: "I'll have to find the Yolen edition, since I collect fairy tale volumes (not the picture books though). Thanks, Jennifer."

My pleasure. It's fantastic.


message 50: by Jennifer (new)

Jennifer Thorne (jennifer_thorne) | 9 comments Lady Danielle "The Book Huntress" wrote: "I'll have to find the Yolen edition, since I collect fairy tale volumes (not the picture books though). Thanks, Jennifer."

Picture books... I admit to being a sucker for lavish art...


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