Akins AP Lang and Comp - Hollis 4 discussion

19 views
A scarlet letter

Comments Showing 1-13 of 13 (13 new)    post a comment »
dateDown arrow    newest »

message 1: by Joelmarin (new)

Joelmarin | 7 comments why does the crowd have all of their attention focused on the prison door? And why is the crowd in a serious,dark mood?


message 2: by Joey (new)

Joey Slavik | 18 comments Joelmarin wrote: "why does the crowd have all of their attention focused on the prison door? And why is the crowd in a serious,dark mood?"

She will be exiting out from the prison door, and the crowd believes that a solemn tone will add to her shame


message 3: by Joey (new)

Joey Slavik | 18 comments If, as the book states, law and religion are almost the same, why don't they decide to give Hester the death penalty for her crime like the bible and law say to do?


message 4: by Joelmarin (new)

Joelmarin | 7 comments Joey wrote: "If, as the book states, law and religion are almost the same, why don't they decide to give Hester the death penalty for her crime like the bible and law say to do?"

I think they didn't give her the death penalty because they wanted to make a sign out of her and have her be tortured verbally by other townsmen of Boston.


message 5: by Joelmarin (new)

Joelmarin | 7 comments Chapter 5 has one of the primary questions of the book: why does Hester choose to stay in Boston when she is free to leave?


message 6: by Johan (new)

Johan Gonzalez | 16 comments I think its not that Hester wanted to leave after she was released from jail, its the fact that she couldn't. She was able to but she wouldn't let herself. Anywhere she would go she would have to live with her mistake, if she even saw it as a mistake in the first place.


message 7: by Navidad (last edited Sep 05, 2010 10:16PM) (new)

Navidad | 3 comments it says "why,gossips what is it but to laugh in the faces of our godly magistrates, and make a pride out of what they, worthy gentlemen, meant for a punishment"
is it pride to Hester, is that what the people think it is to her or do you think she has pride of her own?


message 8: by Christa (new)

Christa | 12 comments On page 73 in chapter 5 it states more or less that Hester, in the town, will become the symbol of frailty and lust. The narrarator recognizes that her baby will be brought up by this "symbol", they dont really say that they are scared that her child will be ill taught, wouldn't you think they would express their concerns of the babies well-being?


message 9: by Christa (last edited Sep 05, 2010 09:49PM) (new)

Christa | 12 comments Johan wrote: "I think its not that Hester wanted to leave after she was released from jail, its the fact that she couldn't. She was able to but she wouldn't let herself. Anywhere she would go she would have to l..."

Although the narrarator states that it is in the reasoning of the bond that this dramatic event has brought (making England her life-long home), I think another reason she stays is because her husband, who is known as Roger Chillingworth, is now in the town. Chillingworth asked Hester to keep his secret, and in some ways, to keep a secret you have to be around people to spill it to. It has more honor tied to it.. at this point, i think Hester is happy to get any honor possible.


message 10: by Navidad (new)

Navidad | 3 comments I agree with Johan that she keepes as much honor as she can, but like Mr. dimmesdale explains why should she stand in shame alone when he should be placed in shame as well. and even though she doesnt win anything keeping queit she still is, i can see she its more of a pride thing she has going on in my opinion.


message 11: by Leona (new)

Leona Lopez | 9 comments Christa wrote: "On page 73 in chapter 5 it states more or less that Hester, in the town, will become the symbol of frailty and lust. The narrarator recognizes that her baby will be brought up by this "symbol", th..."

I think that's what we would do now a days but back then all they thought was that the mother was the devil and the baby was the devil's offspring and so they didn't even want to touch it. So they didn't really care about the baby!


message 12: by Frank (new)

Frank Gutierrez | 5 comments What I don't quite understand is why Hester is not telling anyone who she slept with. Does she think something worse will happen to him if someone was to know?


message 13: by Ian (new)

Ian Oxford | 4 comments Joey wrote: "If, as the book states, law and religion are almost the same, why don't they decide to give Hester the death penalty for her crime like the bible and law say to do?"
Well, in Chapter five, Hester was shown as a person who did an important role to the colony, where they stated that she did work for people of power to show their elegance by beautiful needlework, which could explain why they show her sympathy on the podium where they chastised her for being unholy, but decide to let her live in what they call "shame."

The chapter almost makes her seem generous, seeing as how she helped the poor have clothes, while she also did not wear the most comfortable outfit. i kind of interpreted that as her way of not being conceited. this quality might have had an effect on the magistrate of the colony, seeing as how they treated her with respect(not reverence, but at the most lenient) when confronting her in the marketplace, but who knows what they really thought of her beyond their immediate disgust about adultry.


back to top